learn harder

anonymous asked:

if nina taught baby sonny to read, what did vanessa teach him? or carla?

vanessa taught him the ancient art of the grumps

theyre a force to be reckoned with now 

2

BNHA aesthetics : Bakugou Katsuki

Izuku

Todoroki

something i don’t see a lot in tumblr’s rhetoric about mental illness and recovery is a distinction between recovery through suppression and conformity and recovery through coping.

suppression and conformity is not recovery.  it implies that you are simply repressing the symptoms of your mental illness or disorder and causing yourself more pain.  suppression implies that you are ignoring your mental illness, not acknowledging your symptoms, and conformity implies that you are putting on a neurotypical facade.  so many people assume that’s the end goal of therapy and medication (should people choose to do that) or general recovery. that people are trying to “cure” you.  it’s where i think a lot of the “i shouldn’t need to get better” rhetoric comes from.

but that’s not what recovery is.  recovery is coping.  it’s learning about yourself and how you tick.  it’s learning to recognize and acknowledge symptoms so you can better understand them and, ultimately, not let them control you.  it’s understanding that being “wired” differently isn’t a bad thing, but it can make things harder, and learning to recognize those distinctions and address them so you can make your life easier.  it’s recognizing that for some people, therapy and medication are the path to coping, and that the end goal of them is to make that learning and self-discovery process easier so that those people can do it independently in the long run.

recovery is not changing yourself to fit the world.  recovery is learning how to look the world in the eye and say “i now know how to coexist with you now.  i now know how to thrive.”

HOW TO STUDY/LEARN ANY LANGUAGE

Being a polyglot, I decided to make a post about how to study any language, Without further ado, here it is:

1) TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM ENGLISH

This is the most crucial step to studying/learning a new language. In order for your brain to pick up the new words and ideas, it needs to be more immersed in the language you’re learning. Now for most of us who are learning languages in school, that’s kind of hard, especially since most language classes do most of the work in English until you build a level of fluency. This is the primary reason why immersion programs or immersion schools are so much more successful in teaching a language: you’re forced to talk, write, speak, and think in the language you’re learning. Your brain makes connections faster and thus learns faster to understand and process the language. I would suggest that when you’re learning the language, whether it’s in class time or homework, try to work only in that language. Don’t automatically translate things into English because that’s only going to inhibit your process. Even if your knowledge of the language is limited, practicing thinking in the language, reading the language without translating, and speaking will greatly improve your progress. You’ll find yourself become more fluent and the language will flow rather than be halting because your brain is trying to translate things instead of thinking fluently.

2) LEARN AS MUCH VOCABULARY AS YOU CAN

Vocab is one of, if not the, most important aspect of learning a language. I would even go as far as saying it’s about 70-80% of effectively knowing a language. Think about it this way, if you’re at a restaurant and you’re asked to read the menu or if you’re out and you’re reading signs and advertisements, will knowing hundreds of verbs and their conjugations help you get by? Most likely not. Vocab on the other hand will make the difference between understanding and being totally clueless. If that example didn’t do it for you here’s another one: when you’re speaking to someone how can you express yourself if you don’t know the words? Chances are even if you know no grammar but know key words in the language someone will understand you. Most people don’t pay that much attention to grammar anyway when you’re speaking. As long as you have a basic understanding of it, you’ll be understood. I’m not saying that grammar isn’t important, far from it, but so many people underestimate vocab and focus on grammar and that hinders your learning. Try to learn as much vocab as you can because it will bring you one more step to being fluent. The key to knowing a language is to understand it to a high degree. You can’t understand if you don’t know the words. Find a list with the most common words in the language you’re learning and try to learn them all. Have a goal to learn 10-20 new words per day and you’ll go a long way. If you’re trying to learn vocab I would recommend to have a sheet with all the words you’re trying to learn and their definitions. Hide the words and try to write the vocab by seeing only the definitions. Writing down helps you remember and this method is foolproof. I’ve used it for 6+ years in French and it’s never failed me.

3) LEARN BASIC GRAMMAR

When I say basic grammar, I mean the typical verb tenses and some basic structures. This doesn’t mean learning every single verb conjugated in every single tense, but rather learning the patterns of grammar and how to apply them. Work smarter not harder. Learning the patterns makes it easier to recognize them when you’re reading and remember them when you’re writing. In my opinion, one fault with the way languages are taught in school is the way they teach grammar and how much time they spend on it. Most native speakers don’t worry as much about grammar as non-native speakers do. Again, I’m not saying grammar isn’t important because it is and  you have to know it, but the way it’s taught ruins it. Try to make a chart with all the verb tenses and the patterns that go with the different types of verbs and then a list with the irregular verbs/exceptions. This should be enough to help you gain a basic mastery of grammar. If you know the basic rules, it will become second nature as you speak, write, and read more.

4) READ, LISTEN, AND SPEAK

The language you learn at school is very very different from the language actually spoken in its native country. Most of the language you learn is very formal while in real life, formality is disregarded to a degree and slang is prevalent. In order to build a fluency, you need to read and listen to the language in its natural form to pick up the slang and words that are actually used and not the archaic words that nobody ever says. Listen to music from that language, watch the news in that language, read a book or magazine in that language etc. This will again help your brain learn and process the language better. It will also help with vocabulary and general understanding. Children’s books are the best when you’re starting out. The language is simple and the grammar isn’t to complicated. Start with children’s books and then work your way up to novels and other forms of literature. Listening to the language is also crucial. Try to find mediums where the language is spoken and just listen. Don’t translate or stress yourself out trying to understand it all because you won’t the first couple of times. Just let it sink in. Gradually, you’ll find yourself understanding more and more and you’ll improve. With the speaking aspect, speak as much as you can. Don’t be embarrassed if you stumble, can’t express yourself as much as you would like, or have an accent. I also find that watching/reading/listening to translated works is helpful. Find your favorite book and read it in the language you’re learning, it will help you understand and learn more because you already know what’s going on and can focus on the vocab and grammar. Find your favorite movie and watch it in the language you’re learning. Again, it will help you learn more vocab. The more you practice the better it will get. If you distance yourself from speaking you’ll never improve. Balancing reading, listening, and speaking is the key to being successful.

5) DON’T BE AFRAID TO MESS UP

Nobody becomes fluent over night. Cliche but true. Don’t expect to instantly know everything. It’s normal to struggle and have trouble. Failing is part of the learning process and if you stop practicing because you’re afraid, you’re never going to learn anything. Let go of your fears and insecurities and go for it. If you fall down, pick yourself up and start again. Don’t be embarrassed if you mess up but rather learn from your mistakes and grow. The things we remember most are usually the things where we’ve messed up or had a negative experience with. So use the hiccups as a learning experience and your language skills will improve. 

If you follow these steps, I’m confided that you’ll be better in no time :) The key is to enjoy what you do and have fun! Good luck!

I want to talk today about why Why Animals Do The Thing is done educating on behalf of the wolfdog community. This doesn’t mean I won’t be doing education about wolfdogs if the subject comes up, and I still encourage people to utilize @packwestwolfdogrescue as a source for wolfdog-related information, but WADTT will no longer be advocating for the private-ownership wolfdog community or collaborating with them. I know WADTT readers have really appreciated the previous education surrounding wolfdogs, and I apologize for not being able to continue on a topic that garners so much interest. This is a not a choice I want to make, but one that is necessary, as it has been made clear there is a fundamental incompatibility between their ethos regarding education and public outreach and mine. My ethos for WADTT has always been to create accurate, fact-based education drawn from comprehensive research and to foster a community that encourages dialogue and active collaborative efforts; it is time to disengage from supporting a community whose approach to education is spreads misinformation, attacks learners looking to engage with it, and actively supports harassment.

I’ve been in the various wolfdog Facebook groups since Pack West and I began discussing collaboration about a year ago, because they’re the best source of general education for people interesting in learning about phenotyping and wolfdog behavior. I learned a huge amount from those groups - both about wolfdogs and about the general mentality of the people who own them and participate in discussions about them online. As an educator, it was hard to watch and as someone who wanted to learn it was even harder to engage in.

The education done there of new members was consistently combative and hostile - with threads often devolving into lambasting people for not doing more research before asking questions - and occasionally threads would be created about the new members and how much their attempts to contribute to conversations before they knew everything were a problem. The only people who were considered credible when discussing wolfdogs were those who had owned wolf content animals for most of their lives - which meant that the input of anyone with relevant professional experience was ignored, if not often outright denied as being valid. This meant that the actual education accomplished in the groups was really vitriolic and frequently inaccurate: some posts would invite people to try to phenotype animals for education, but the same people involved would immediately turn around on other posts and condemn people for phenotyping animals they hadn’t met; the discussions about wolfdog behavior I observed were full of urban legends and misunderstandings of dog behavior, and awareness of recent research or even understanding of basic behavioral science concepts was frequently absent; training wolfdogs was not considered unimportant and frequently discouraged, and it seemed that using preventative training strategies to safely manage typical wolfdog behaviors wasn’t even on the radar. Education from the groups in general required being able to discriminate between mythology and fact and the ability to weather the constant unpleasantness that pervaded the threads. I chose to stay because I didn’t want to ask Pack West to be my only wolfdog primary source, and it was important to me to engage with the community I wanted to assist as an outside educator.

Last week, I published an article on what people should know about one of the most internet-famous misrepresented wolfdog, Loki. I’ve talked about Loki in posts a few times on this blog, and while I was at Pack West in January it became clear from our discussions that a larger article was necessary due to the frequency of questions received about him. When the article was published, while the response on tumblr was fairly positive, it brought on a deluge of harassment from the wolfdog community on Facebook that has not yet ended at the time of writing this post. It is the response to that article, specifically the pieces of it that they chose to attack, that finalized my choice to disengage from the private-ownership wolfdog community and helping with their outreach efforts.

I originally shared my article on the groups I was in as an offer of an outside resource that could be utilized, since I had asked the groups for assistance finding sources when I began writing it two months earlier. In the time I had been part of the groups, Loki had been a frequent topic of discussion and irritation, and I assumed that it might be useful for them to have a link to offer people rather than having to reiterate the facts so often.

In response, I was swamped with enough comments to shut down my ability to use Facebook for a couple days: how I don’t have enough experience to write anything education related to wolfdogs, how it’s completely unthinkable to publicize even a well-agreed-upon phenotype on an animal I have never personally met, how I should get sued for writing such a character attack, how I’m not actually an educator and just a person with a vendetta, etc. In addition, multiple threads discussing how appalling it was that the article existed at all and everything wrong with it showed up in the groups, because the fact that they were visible to me didn’t matter. I engaged with a few of them in a similar matter to how I respond to critique on the blog, explaining my reasons for writing and my sources. The comments and the private messages got nastier once I made it clear I wasn’t willing to capitulate to taking the article down. I was eventually kicked out of the main group without any communication or explanation from the mods as to what I’d done to violate the rules. It was exhausting and it hasn’t calmed down: I’m still getting passive-aggressively tagged in things on the groups I haven’t left to give my “expertise”. I recently received a letter from the board of the National Lupine Association, whose phenotyping pamphlet I linked to in the text of the post as further reading, officially requesting that I remove any reference to their association from my blog post. It’s awful and it’s exhausting, but the harassment isn’t why I’m no longer willing to support the private-ownership wolfdog community - it’s because of the type of feedback given regarding how they want education regarding wolfdogs to be done.

These are the major points made by the private-ownership wolfdog community (meaning they were repeated multiple times by different people) in response to my article that elucidated how incompatible the reasons I do education are with that community:

  • My article was not approved by the general community and therefore should not exist. The private-ownership wolfdog community hates messaging they cannot control, especially if they do not agree with it. Some of the well-respected members had told me not to publish when I first brought it up in January, and they were furious that I had not obeyed.
  • My article might have created blowback against the wolfdog community by Loki’s owner, which meant silencing me was more important than educating the general public. The private-ownership wolfdog community is terrified of aggravating Loki’s owner, as they believe he has threatened to use his fame to go anti-ownership, and are desperate to do anything to prevent that occurring. No matter how many animals are killed or left in horrible welfare situations because of the exact type of misrepresentation Loki and his owner perpetuate, it is more important to the majority of the Facebook community to not risk having someone popular speak out against them than to accurately educate the public to prevent other animals suffering in the future.
  • My article contained a phenotype I did not have enough “experience” to be giving, no matter where I sourced it from, so the article could not be credible. Even though I had produced educational content for the wolfdog community regarding phenotyping before, did research into Loki’s parents and kennel of origin, and discussed his phenotype at length with an expert before writing, my lack of personal wolfdog ownership discredited the validity of any educational material produced.
  • My article mentioned having been in contact with a government agency as part of my research, which is a cardinal sin. I contacted USDA regarding the existence of an exhibition permit for Loki - the private-ownership wolfdog community does not believe anyone should ever interface with any authorities regarding a wolfdog, no matter what the situation. (In some ways, this is a reasonable concern, as people have historically reported animals to the government and gotten them taken or killed. However, as Loki is internationally famous, he is not an animal that animal-related government agencies would not already be aware of. Moreover, Loki lives in a wolfdog legal state, USDA considers wolfdogs domestic animals by their own regulatory definitions, and USDA is primarily concerned with enforcing licensing and registration in accordance with the Animal Welfare Act. Inquiring as a journalist about the existence or lack thereof of a specific permit would, at worst, get Loki’s owner fined and forced to get the permit.)
  • My article told the truth about rabies law as it applies to wolfdogs, and it was inappropriate for the general public to be aware of that information.

That is not the education I believe in doing. I do not believe in advocating for people who allow vague threats to keep them from speaking out about an issue that regularly gets animals they care about killed. I do not believe in being told not to do thorough research because it might involve a regulatory agency. I do not believe in being told that it’s inappropriate to educate the public about laws that both protect our pets and could also get them killed just because the truth isn’t pretty or straight forward. And I really don’t believe in supporting a community that is willing to attack and discredit any advocacy on their behalf that they don’t control.

I’ve chosen to remove the Loki post from the WADTT side indefinitely. I abhor letting the bullies win, but the choice comes down to the fact that this is not the hill I want to die on. What I’m trying to build with WADTT is bigger than this and I’d rather fold on this single piece of writing for now to facilitate what I want it to become in the future. The blog has been completely dark for over a week, which hasn’t occurred since I started it two years ago, because this has impacted my mental health so drastically. The folk supporting the WADTT patreon and WADTT’s future are supporting me so I can be present and do daily education, so for now, that’s what I’m choosing to prioritize.

Regular posting and the queue should resume in the next couple of days.

You know what bothers me about so many books with magic in them? Human magic users witches, wizards etc are always “different” then other humans. There’s always something special about them.

But the thing about magic is that anyone with an interest can learn it. Sometimes it’s harder for some, but real life witchcraft can be learned by anyone.

I want to see a series about young people, average young people with no special powers or ancestors, learn magic because they desperately want to have some sort of control over their lives. I want to see then struggle and triumph through hard work and occasional breakthroughs instead of being special.

After the heartbreak, I promised to never be that girl again.
I fulfilled the cliche-
I cut my hair short.
Something to mark a new beginning.
I got a tattoo with no real significance.
Most things in life don’t make sense anyways.
I moved further away from my parents and it was more than a metaphor.
I’ve learned that life is harder without the people who love you and returned to sleep in the bed that held me far longer than you ever did.
I don’t miss you anymore.
You still act weird around me, sit in the corner of a room and pretend that I do not exist.
Some days it feels as if I don’t.
There is no one here to love me like I deserve to be loved.
My voice is still not loud enough to be heard over all the background noise.
My friends are fixated on superficial things.
A love that doesn’t last.
A party last weekend where they fooled themselves into thinking alcohol tastes better when you are hurting and fell asleep on the couch of a stranger.
This is a measurement of how much ache we fail to acknowledge.
How many things we kick underneath our doormats just to prove that there is a way to keep moving forward.
If there is a way to keep moving forward,
for me, it has never looked like this.
Instrumental Condescension,

Quite often I find people like to say, “oh this instrument is so much harder to learn than this one.” Or “Flute is so easy, try violin.” And I strongly disagree. That being said, I do believe that violin or any string instrument for that is quite challenging, but no one ever wants to take in account the different requirements. While flute may be “easier” to pick up, developing a mastery over tone, musicality and technique, is not easier. I’ve showed my string player friends my technique exercises and they flip out. So I really hate when people are lecturing a class and they blow off the wind instruments as being so much easier than string instruments, it’s rude and it really tears down the hard work that I do and it’s not polite.

On Procrastination...

I have been a procrastinator my entire life… doing everything we tend to do, struggling with everything we are famous for. 

Here are three major learnings I would like to share:

 1. … is THE thief of time.

Meaning that it procrastinating definitely is the worst way to spend your most precious resource. Hanging round the house because there is still homework to do… not doing it until late night… simply does not make any sense. 

Constantly procrastinating probably is the only sure way not to be successful. 

This clip sums it up perfectly: 

2. You can get a lot done by avoiding doing something

Procrastination - “the denial of work” - does not automatically mean to WASTE time frees energy and creates results!

It sound totally weird but while you do something in order to deny work you can actually get a lot of other useful stuff done. 

… review your numbers and tracking
… call someone you should talk to (more)
… reorganize your calendar to be prepared for everything next week
… sit with your strategy team and check the course of your enterprise
… clean your desk/ optimize your processes
… plan your next move (marketing activities, sales pitches, hiring someone, …)

SO: 

If you can’t help to procrastinate… try to use the time for something that at least contributes to your success somehow…


3. Your inner procrastinator is wise

Believe it or not - but the feeling that makes you procrastinate is a perfect compass. 

By an unknown reason your inner procrastinator always seems to know what really matters. It is very much likely that it is this awareness what creates the unpleasant feeling inside. 

But it also works the other way around: this feeling reliably flags what to care about. 

It tells you clearly and precisely the one thing to do. 


PS: With these three thoughts in mind I was able to accept being a procrastinator… and to make the absolute best of it. 

Your m

anonymous asked:

How does calling someone dumb constitute ableist language?

the word “dumb” has historically meant “unable to speak” but it’s also an insult that hinges on calling somebody unintelligent.

why should we throw people who find it harder to learn under the bus by using intelligence-based insults when we could use actually descriptive, useful words like “ridiculous” or “silly” or “misguided” rather than just saying “hey you you’re less intelligent and that’s a bad thing you should feel bad about”

Freelancing - How to Make a Living To Make a Life

What Led Me to Full Time Freelancing 

For the past two years, my income has been strictly from freelance jobs.  These were sporadic things that pulled in some scratch while I went to school and worked on my personal projects.  I had applied for studio jobs in Los Angeles, but to no avail. Six months ago, I went full time freelance, putting aside all personal projects to take on every paying comics job and animation gig I could get my hands on. This was not necessarily because I ‘hit the big time.’ A very desperate financial situation drove me seek that work out. For legal reasons I can’t discuss the details, but all I can say for now is that a certain family member forced me out of my home in California, causing me to move back to Florida. That’s why my webcomics have been on indefinite hold. That’s why my latest Kickstarter fulfillment has been moving at a snail’s pace compared to the first one. That’s why I’ve been pretty squirrely about a lot of things. 

Since 'the fall,’ I have become a full time freelance artist. I mainly work as a comics colorist because a) since my pencil and ink work isn’t in huge demand, it’s an easier marketing angle and b) I love nothing more than to color purdy things. Seriously, no phrase in the English language gets me more giddy than the words 'low winter sun’ or 'yes, you can use watercolors for this.’ You just don’t even know.  

To the casual onlooker, I look like I’ve my act together. I can tell total strangers that my full time job is illustration with a completely straight face. I can work from any location on the globe where I have an internet connection. Hell, I’m on the brink of adding a major publisher to my resume (meep). But I’m not a huge success story (yet). I’m a work in progress. I’ve made mistakes and earned a lot of battle scars in not a lot of time. 

Let my battle scars be the road map to your success.  

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