leaf cricket

10

The TOP TEN ORTHOPTERAN images taken in 2015 and posted to itchydogimages on Flickr (according to Flickr’s “interestingness” algorithm).

Click on and scroll through images for IDs…..

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese grasshoppers, katydids and crickets on my Flickr site HERE…..

Leaf-rolling Cricket (Gryllacrididae), female

The leaf-rolling (or raspy) crickets are the grumpy old folk of the insect world, seemingly always on the defensive and always mad as hell. Admittedly, it’s a pretty intimidating strategy.

They are remarkable for several reasons, not least is the fact that during the day, these large nocturnal crickets rest in shelters made from folded leaves sewn up with silk. Silk production is a capability quite foreign to Orthopterans (grasshoppers and crickets) but a distinguishing feature of some members of this family. This female’s threat display is in response to me evicting her from one such shelter.

She is also playing host to a gang of mites (the red blobs) firmly adhered to her wings.

External image


by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese grasshoppers and crickets on my Flickr site HERE…..

rikuyomi  asked:

While shooting, do any of the bugs or other wildlife you encounter show hostility towards you?

That very much depends on the type of insect of course and on how threatened they feel. I certainly don’t set out to provoke them, but there is no denying a defensive pose or threat display usually makes for a more interesting photo.

I have been stung by Nocturnal Hornets while doing night shooting (see that tumblr post HERE) and I have certainly been intimidated by Predatory Hornets (Vespa velutina) while trying to photograph them and even when not trying to photograph them…..

External image

The Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillars of the Limacodid Cup Moths are passively hostile by default and even the slightest brush against them inflicts a seriously painful sting. This can happen while searching for them amongst foliage or while adjusting the foliage around a subject so as to get a clear shot. I have experienced this many times…..

External image

And the Chalcosiine Day-flying Moth Caterpillars (Zygaenidae) express their displeasure by excreting droplets of cyanide from the tubercles on their skin….

External image

Otherwise, hostility usually takes the form of threat displays which in themselves are harmless but intended to strike fear in my heart and confusion in my mind and send me scurrying away with my tail between my legs…..

External image

External image

External image

I usually try not to handle my subjects, but when I do it is to give some sense of scale or to relocate them from hazardous situations. Particularly with the larger insects, although they are not intentionally harmful in themselves, the sheer size of their anatomy means sharp claws and strong jaws have drawn blood on occasion as well….

External image
External image

(Click any image to be taken to its respective Flickr page for a fuller explanation.)