leading actor performances

Nervously but proudly rooting for a show

Anastasia
Bandstand
Come From Away
Dear Evan Hansen                                                                                        Falsettos
Groundhog Day
Hello, Dolly!
Holiday Inn
Miss Saigon
War Paint

7

La La Land (2016)

Directed by Damien Chazelle

Cinematography by Linus Sandgren

To A Stranger // Performance In A Leading Role, by Mad_Lori

I received a lot of requests (after this recent photoshoot had surfaced) to do my version of a film poster for PiaLR. So here it is! If you haven’t yet read the fic, do yourself a favour, and do it. I imagine everyone in this fandom has, though.

7

Manchester by the Sea (2016)

Directed by Kenneth Lonergan

Cinematography by Jody Lee Lipes

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O.M.G what a #surprise ❤️❤️❤️ #love both sooooo much❤️ #Hamilton #thecolorpurple #thebest #performance #leading #actor and #actress #musical
#lastyear #leslieodomjr #cynthiaerivo #tonyawards2017

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Nervously but proudly rooting for a show

Anastasia
Bandstand
Come From Away                                                                                       Falsettos
Groundhog Day
Hello, Dolly!
Holiday Inn
Miss Saigon
Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812
War Paint

Hollywood Has No Business Case for Booking All-White Casts 

According to a recent article from the Atlantic.com, blaming the lack of diversity on customer preference is irresponsible and baseless.

Hollywood’s track record on showcasing minority talent and storylines is pretty awful, even considering some recent efforts to diversify programming. Some studios argue that the fault lies not with them, but with consumers, who—they claim—prefer predominantly white casts. But is there any truth to that?

Venkat Kuppuswamy and Peter Younkin, business-school professors at the University of North Carolina and McGill University, respectively, took a look at data on the film industry in order to measure how diverse casts went over at box offices.

For their study, Kuppuswamy and Younkin took a look at 723 mainstream English-language movies released in major theaters between 2011 and 2015, and determined the number of black actors in lead roles in each film. In nearly two-thirds of the films, there were no black actors cast in any lead roles. In 23 percent of the films, there was one. Only in 11 percent were there two or more black principals.

The relative rarity of diverse casts might suggest that they have little money-making potential, but after parsing the data, the researchers came to the conclusion that audiences don’t reject films with diverse lead actors—they actually prefer them. 

According to Kuppuswamy and Younkin, adding more black actors in principal roles had a beneficial effect on box-office outcomes. The films that had only one black lead actor performed about as well as those films that had none. But films that had two or more black actors playing main roles performed even better, boosting box-office revenues by more than 60 percent compared to films that didn’t have any black lead actors. 

Read more on the atlantic.com.

Nervously but proudly rooting for a show

Anastasia
Bandstand
Come From Away
Dear Evan Hansen                                                                                        Falsettos
Hello, Dolly!
Holiday Inn
Miss Saigon
Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812
War Paint

youtube

100 BAFTA Moments - 21 Days to Go

Sir Anthony Hopkins wins the Leading Actor award for his performance as Hannibal Lecter in 1992.

Thoughts about Streetcar & signings after shows...

As someone who has worked on West End productions/within London theatres, and has insight into some Broadway productions too it is extremely unusual for the leading lady of a show to spend this much time signing for fans and interacting with them after a performance. @your-perfect-opposite said this perfectly in this post.

The original London cast of ‘Wicked’ starred the Tony award winning actress Idina Menzel, for example, who gave electric performances on stage every night. She only signed at the stage door occasionally and sporadically, and even then usually for only a handful of lucky fans. (This is no reflection on Idina whatsoever, who was always wonderful with the fans she was able to spend time with) 

In fact, bosses in charge of theatre productions often actively discourage their leading actors from doing stage door signings after performances - they want their talent to be up to the task of carrying eight shows per week. They want them to stay healthy, and not get sick. Carrying the weight of a theatre production involves a lot of money, and a lot of people’s jobs rely upon it. It is a stressful situation for a lead actor and no small achievement!

Stage door signings were explained to me like this by a London stage actor:-

‘Imagine you’ve just finished work, your feet are killing you, your voice is nearly gone. Especially on a two show day. Every bit of energy has left your body. It’s just like you’ve pulled a double shift in a restaurant or a call centre or something. All you want to do afterwards is go home, eat, maybe have a hot bath, go to sleep then wake up and repeat the whole process again. The last thing you’d want is to be accosted by a group of people on your way home, even if they are mostly kind, sweet and supportive.’

Having been lucky enough to attend opening previews of Streetcar in NYC, not only did Gillian give incredibly powerful stage performances, but signed for fans afterwards.Staying to sign & talk to fans is entirely at her own discretion - let me assure you nobody will be asking or pressuring Gillian to do this. 

She was gracious enough to chat with me on two occasions, (adorably, she switched to her British accent as soon as she heard mine!) and I saw her having conversations with lots of other fans too, however brief. She was extremely natural in her interactions - really cared where people had travelled from, was sincerely touched by the gifts they had given her. 

Gillian stayed until she had signed for every person waiting in line - then still stopped for another fan on her way to her car. This woman is a genuine star - in more ways than one.

3

MY BEST LEADING ACTOR PERFORMANCES

9. Edward Norton (American History X, 1998)

There are truly some great films out there that I feel have gotten lost in their own right or just not as appreciated as they should. American History X is one such movie. There has not been a movie that has been able to what this movie did. It really gives you a new perspective on certain things. And a lot of it, I feel, is due to Edward Norton’s powerful performance as Derek Vinyard.

In contrast from Daniel Day-Lewis’ performance, Edward Norton does not have handicaps. He has everything at his expense to create this extremely twisted and complex character. Derek Vinyard goes through so many changes during the film. He begins as a bright teenager that a lot of people felt could go far, but after his father’s death, ends up joining the skin-head/Neo-Nazi movement where he soon arises as one of the more prominent figures. Then, he gets caught for murdering two black men and sent to prison for three years where he is forced into living amongst his allies as well as the African-Americans he so despised. It puts him in a deep dark reflection as he soon realizes the backlash of his actions and the hurt it put on his family. It’s one of those truly great redemption stories and is probably one of the most harsh considering what the major turning point is.

Again, Edward Norton really is what makes this story so resonant and powerful. The scene where he is arrested, the murders are absolutely terrifying. If anything, Derek is about as psychotic as you can get and you pretty much believe him and the actor playing him are crazed bloodthirsty animals. When he curb stomps one of them before the police come racing around the corner, the look on his brother’s face than that last mad glint you see in Derek’s eyes before handcuffed faltering moments later. There is just so much you get out of that, so much about what it means for Derek to be arrested. Then, we kinda lose the intensity and animosity of Derek Vinyard at the beginning of the film smoothly transitioning to prison life where his hatred towards certain racial and religious groups is evident. Then, his guard comes down and the crumbling is so heartbreaking to watch especially when his old high school principal comes to visit him after the rape and he breaks down in tears, knowing all the wrongs he has done and how his brother may be headed in the same direction. I could go on and on about this performance, but I won’t and just say you have to see this film to experience what is such a harsh and harrowing performance as well as watch a very unique film.

It’s a shame how after this Edward Norton never found another great role to really carry him on in the film industry, more reason to why it should be recognized. I know Wes Anderson finally nabbed him this year for Moonrise Kingdom, maybe he’ll do a total one eighty with some kookie lead role that hands him his well-deserved Oscar since I think he may have actually been robbed here. He has many years ahead of him so hopefully he’ll become as prominent and lauded as he was in the near future.

The men have already gotten their due for the moment, so I’ll be switching over to the ladies next for two more great performance analysis. Stay tuned!

Our laudatory for Hannibal

While the critically acclaimed series, Hannibal was cancelled last July, the show has continued to accrue nominations, awards, and media attention. However, neither the show nor its outstanding performances, especially those by Hugh Dancy and Mads Mikkelsen, have been recognized by the Emmys. 

While Hannibal missed the Emmy window last year, we would like to remind everyone that it is very much eligible for this year’s awards.

So, you may be asking, why would we go to the effort to promote Hannibal and the lead actors’ performances for Emmy consideration?

Hannibal, in a word, is unique. The acting is emotionally powerful, the writing masterfully crafted, and the visuals deliciously composed… and we haven’t even mentioned the brilliant soundtrack, set or costume design.  

As Hannibal Lecter, Mads Mikkelsen cultivates a slow, underlying terror in tandem with a scorned tenderness, resulting in a character that is both terrifying and sympathetic, repulsive and magnetic. The cultivated exterior belies Hannibal Lecter’s monstrous core, frighteningly powerful in its aura. Mikkelsen’s seemingly effortless re-imagining of Lecter’s character manages to eclipse previous incarnations of Lecter in film. Quite simply, Mikkelsen’s Lecter is sublime and legendary.

Hannibal’s no less operatic counterpart, empathic crime profiler Will Graham, who is played by Hugh Dancy, provides a hauntingly breath-taking performance of his own. Weaving together his character’s troubled psyche along with the multiple personas of the serial killers with whom he is forced to connect, Dancy’s performance demands subtlety and nuance. He creates a person of contradictions: compassionately cruel, lovingly withdrawn, aggressively passive, brokenly whole and allows the show to pave the way for a better addressing of mental illness in the media.

Dancy and Mikkelsen inhabit their roles so seamlessly we are all mesmerized.

We fear that while Hannibal is on hiatus, there is no network to champion it, to present it to the academy—its stars and its daring overlooked despite its extraordinary vision and contribution to the evolution of television.  

Hannibal defies categorization and should the Emmys only support what is popular, not what is innovative?  

So consider the purpose of the Emmy’s: to acknowledge excellence in television, to give recognition to work in television that has influenced and inspired the industry.  Flip through your channels, or scour streaming sites, and you will see Hannibal’s influence everywhere: from comedy programming such as “Key and Peele” and “Archer,” to art house dramas such as “True Detective” and “Man in the High Castle.”  Hannibal has not only influenced other writers, it has changed the television landscape.  

We are asking you to give acknowledgement to the beauty, talent, and art where it is due.

We are asking for you to recognize the cast and crew’s ingenuity and dedication to quality and inventive television.

There are many shows on TV – but Hannibal is Art.

Honor Hannibal’s contribution to television by recognizing the show and its performances for what they are: Emmy worthy.