nightkrawlr asked:

If I have a monastery swiftspear in play and then cast, in this order, a Titan's Strength followed by a Gift of Tusks, both targetting the swiftspear. My friend calims the spear is now just a 3/3 elephant. I claim he is now a 8/6 elephant (2 1/1 prowess triggers + 1 3/1 titan's strength on a 3/3 base creature). Which is true?

It will be an 8/6. 

When there are multiple effects trying to all apply to a creature’s power and toughness, we apply them in a certain order. Here’s how it all breaks down:

First we apply Gift of Tusk’s effect that sets the base power and toughness to 3/3. Effects that set power and toughness always come before other effects that modify it.

Next we apply the effects that modify P/T without setting it, so two prowess triggers and Titan’s Strength, for +1/+1, +1/+1, and +3/+1.

The end result is an 8/6 elephant.

MBTI types and their Layers of Meanness

INFJ 

Surface: Pretty kind

Middle-layer: Their hidden malice starts showing up

Deep down: They’re so done with you they could kill you with only one hand

INTJ

Surface: You better stay away 

Middle-layer: Nah, when you know them they’re not so evil

Deep down: I was kidding, they’ve already killed you

INFP

Surface: Opinionated but harmless evil

Middle-layer: Opinionated evil

Deep down: RUN. JUST. RUN. AND. HIDE. 

INTP

Surface: Zero evil

Middle-layer: The “DON’T MESS WITH MY FANDOM” evil (this is: so scary)

Deep down: Still zero evil (Update: they try to be 110% evil because they don’t want to be the ‘good ones’) 

ENFJ

Surface: 1% evil with an 1% margin of error 

Middle-layer: Are you sure you want to mess with me? *smirk*

Deep down: I TOLD YA *world is in flames*

ENTJ

Surface: The executive agressive evil.

Middle-layer: They’re seriously kind.

Deep down: The American Psycho evil. No middle point.

ENFP

Surface: Flowers

Middle-layer: You make a perfume with the petals of the flowers and you die intoxicated

Deep down: 200% evil. Yes, it increases.

ENTP

Surface: The “MUAHAHAHAHAHAHA” evil

Middle-layer: Sociopath evil

Deep down: What… wait… what happened? I didn’t meant to be so evil… I guess… (So, not actually evil …………. I guess).

ISFJ

Surface: They’re all loving and caring

Middle-layer: They kind of hate you and your petitions but they can handle it

Deep down: So done. Go fuck off and leave them alone or you can regret it later

ISTJ

Surface: Cold cats

Middle-layer: Angry cats

Deep down: Cold and angry cats. This is: very evil.

ISFP

Surface: Calm evil

Middle-layer: Slightly bitchy behaviour

Deep down: GET OUTTA MY FACE YOU SON OF A HYENA

ISTP

Surface: You don’t really know what to expect, actually

Middle-layer: BADBOI BADGIRL uuuh uuuuhhh uuuuuuuuh okno

Deep down: They’re maybe the cutest of the list

ESFJ

Surface: Not actually evil

Middle-layer: Passive-agressive evil

Deep down: They can set you on fire

ESTJ

Surface: MOVE BITCH GET OFF THE WAY

Middle-layer: not evil found, actually

Deep down: ok bUT MOVE RIGHT NOW OR I SWEAr

ESFP

Surface: Smiles and giggles  (you can decide how much this is evil)

Middle-layer: Super sassy bitch mode on

Deep down: Regret all they said and done on the previous layer, but don’t care really much, so: sort of evil but not dangerous

ESTP

Surface: DANGEROUS IS MY MIDDLE NAME

Middle-layer: FIGHT ME

Deep down: Little bunnies

5

Last week’s #BKMconservation post focused on the treatment of flaking paint in Stuart Davis’s The Mellow Pad. Now we can look closer at the materials through technical analysis. Multispectral imaging is a great way to lay foundation that will inform the fine-tuned technical work to come—and it is proof that science can be beautiful!

The images above were created by capturing The Mellow Pad’s behavior in different wavelengths of light (energy). Different types of light are often a conservator’s first tool in understanding the materials and condition of an artwork. Multispectral imaging captures specific ranges of wavelengths, including some that are invisible to the naked eye, for specific purposes:

  • VIS: Visible reflected light. The colors you see every day are the first clues.
  • UVL: Ultraviolet-induced visible luminescence. Wild colors! Materials either absorb energy and darken or luminesce in a descriptive way, based on the colorants and binding media.
  • UVR: Ultraviolet reflected light. The distribution of coatings can be mapped.
  • IRR: Infrared reflected light. Carbon-based materials (such as graphite) stand out as black in this striking black and white technique.
  • VIL: Visible-induced infrared luminescence. Cadmium-containing pigments (and a few others) appear bright.

By comparing the images, we learn what type of light excites which colors. Some materials are clearly identified in this way, and remaining questions are better defined to help direct further analysis. The right equipment is essential for this process. In recent months, the BKM lab has acquired several new light sources, a modified digital camera, a range of lens filters, and specialized image processing software thanks to Bank of America’s generous support of this research project.

The Mellow Pad has hidden layers as well, which can’t be reached with lighting techniques. Dense, radio opaque pigments such as lead white show up brightly in this X-ray image below, informing us as to where additional information lies beneath the surface.

These images are just the beginning of the analytical puzzle. Stay tuned for the more in the investigation of The Mellow Pad, and in the meantime remember: science is a beautiful thing.

Posted by Jessica Ford