layered-tops

anonymous asked:

Oh my stars your art is amazing!!! Do you think maybe you can make a shading tutorial sheet? owo

Hey there Anon! Sure thing! I’ll do my best to explain the process of how I usually do things in regards to coloring and shading. I’m not the greatest at Explaining, so I’ll do my best to keep things as crystal clear as possible!

Step 1: Lineart
I’ll start with Lineart purely because this step is important to the coloring process in one regard, and that is making sure the entire line layer is closed without any holes. Even the smallest little gap will make the selection process hard later, and we don’t want that. So the cleaner lineart you have, the better. I’m going to go ahead and use my Monster Hunter Generations Huntress for this.

Step 2: Selection
Either in Photoshop or SAI or whatever you use, click outside your character and any other negative space surrounding them. This means…basically anything that’s not your character. Then go to Selection > Inverse and invert the selection. You should have something similar to what I have below. This makes it so much easier to add colors without having to worry about all the little nooks and crannies that could mess the cleanliness of the drawing up real bad.

Step 3: Flat Base
Create a new layer beneath your line layer with the selection still active. This will be our color layer. Remove the visibility of the line layer, and fill the remaining “Silhouette” with a dark base color. This makes those nasty corners look a bit cleaner, as sometimes if there is a lighter color your computer will want to make them stand out pixelated. Again, this is just for cleanliness beneath the line layer. Turn your line layer back on, as they will now act as barriers for the fill bucket tool. Make sure the entire silhouette is filled, and that no lines were accidentally selected! You want a see a completely filled and flat color if you turn the line layer off.

Step 4: Flat Colors
At this point you can lock the transparency of your Color Layer, and go ham. Either with the pen or a fill bucket, figure out how you want to color your character and add in the flat colors. Notice I’m on the same layer as the Base that we made. This is so those lines still play nicely with one another. Clean up where necessary.

Step 5: Analogous Color Gradient
Well, we don’t really want our character to be too flat, do we? This is where the color wheel becomes your best friend. Select similar colors with the Magic Wand (like I’ve done her skin tone here) and using the color wheel, choose an analogous (that means “close by” in color wheel terms) color to add a bit of depth to the color. For skin, I usually go with a red or a bronze, sometimes purple. Use the airbrush for this. Then, deselect and select another color to gradient, until all the colors have some degree of new color to them.

See? Now things look interesting! We added some blue to the greens, some purples to the reds, some blues to the grays and so on and so forth.

Step 6: Shading
Okay, here’s where things get interesting. Time to shade. Make a new layer between the Line Layer and Color Layer, and make sure you make it a clipping group/clipping mask. This is so it won’t go anywhere that you don’t have color. Set it to multiply or linear burn (whichever you think looks best) and bump the opacity down to about 40-50%. Choose a color (or color-value gradient, if you have drastic value changes in your piece that make light and dark values not play well with the single color you picked, and swap between those) that you want the shadows to be; I like deep pinks and purples. AVOID BLACK. I first use the Pen tool to get down “hard” shadows - shadows cast by hard materials, close shadows, and inorganic materials. Once I’ve got those down, I head on over to the softer areas, such as the skin, hair and cloth and alternate between the watercolor and marker tools to give “softer” shadows. There’s no real law to this, you just have to know where shadows fall and how they behave and  work with those three tools to get the look you want.

Step 7: “Highlights” - Rim Lighting
Okay, these aren’t really “highlights” in the correct sense, but adding sort of “rim lighting” around forms really helps make a picture pop. To do this, make another layer above the shading layer, set it to “screen” and keep the opacity at 100%. Then, get really familiar with your CRTL key because you’re going to be color sourcing a lot. To add a rim light to a form, select the base color of that form, and use the marker to trace along the edges. For example, I picked up the nude from the skin, the silver from the dagger, the gold and maroon from the hair and the tawny brown from the skull to use on those specific objects. Any place you want clean works well, but the edges of forms works best for this technique. Additionally, if you’d like, you can create another layer above the Screen Layer and set it to Linear Dogde, and do my “glowing eyes” technique on anything you want to stand out, such as the metal of the belt, gold objects and of course, eyes.

Step 8: The Overlay
Almost done! While your photo can now stand alone as “finished”, there’s one more thing that I enjoy doing, and that’s adding a simple color overlay to bring the whole picture together. This is done by flattening all the layers you have so far (you’ll want to “Merge Down” in order from bottom to top or “Flatten” to avoid the layers going crazy on each other) into one layer. Then, make a layer on top of that one, set it to a clipping mask, and set it to “overlay”. With the Airbrush, choose some colors (I prefer soft pinks, blues and violets) and go along the “edges” of your character with a BIIIIIG brush. This kind of resembles soft ambient lighting or shadows. I just think it makes the photo look nicer.

TA-DA! And Now we’re done!

And there we go! I hope that helped, and I also apologize cause this ask sat in my box for awhile and I never got around to it until now. :P
I’d be happy to answer any questions y’all have, but this is the simple basics! Remember to practice practice PRACTICE!
-Gael

anonymous asked:

your comic of long haired mob and reigen is AMAZING! if you dont mind me asking, how did you make the colors in your comics look uniform (ie: blue in that one comic) and yet still recognizable of their original/normal color palettes, did you use a layer mode? or something else?

OKAY THIS IS. a challenging question to answer, even though it’s easy in practice.

The Doozy ABoT comic is a bit of an exception to the rule of how I color in general, but I can show you a glimpse into how that color process went. Also I use Sai for everything listed.

I’m using a picture I haven’t colored/merged yet to show what I mean, since you need to keep the lineart separate for my process to work. You can see how I color lineart here. Here it’s just at 30% lumi&shade.

Ya start with ur flats. Rad. (and always have backup flats on a duplicated layer)

getcha some faded blue set on a grouped screen layer.

Some faded blue on a multiply layer

(this is where i divulge from how i usually color comics, to be continued below **)

Because the comic was a night scene, i leave the darks/contrast as is, since you lose a majority of it in dark scenes, and just apply an orange screen layer where the light’s gonna hit them.

select the inverse of that (with some space to give that weird shade-line in my stuff) and add some more blue on a screen layer and viola! you got my basic process for coloring that comic. and you didn’t even have to do much to preserve the original color palettes in people’s minds.

**back to how i normally color comics (here i used faded purple on my screen/multiply layers)

your average scene is very well lit, so it’s important to show the regular contrast as is. so – you get your sucker all done up, then

you adjust the brightness/contrast/color deepen until it reflects the difference you started with. now u have your original set of hues looking like it got passed through a purple color filter, but functioning better imo.

I personally like it a little toned down, so I add back in some of that reserve flat layer. I eyeball it, but this was around 52% opacity.

Multiply layer where your shades go. (with more faded purple)

Luminosity layer on top of the shades to make that solid line in my darks I was talkin about. (with even more faded purple)

And you can have an optional screen layer in the highlights (by selecting the inverse of your shade layer.) Here I used yellow bc why not. 

That is the other important thing about my art. My shades and highlights are kept to 1-2 colors. Here it’s orange and green

Here it’s blue and red. The simplicity looks better to my eyes.

aight you made it to the bottom go treat urself to smth nice

Happy National Techies Day!

October 3 is National Techies Day…and here at NASA we have quite a few people who get REALLY excited about technology. Without techies and the technology they develop, we wouldn’t be able to do the amazing things we do at NASA, or on Earth and in space.

Our Techies

We love our techies! The passionate engineers, researchers and scientists who work on our technology efforts enable us to make a difference in the world around us. They are responsible for developing the pioneering, new technologies and capabilities needed to achieve our current and future missions.

Research and technology development take place within our centers, in academia and industry, and leverage partnerships with other government agencies and international partners. We work to engage and inspire thousands of technologists and innovators creating a community of our best and brightest working on the nation’s toughest challenges.

Technology Drives Exploration

Our investments in technology development enable and advance space exploration. We are continually seeking to improve our ability to access and travel through space, land more mass in more locations, enable humans to live and explore in space and accelerate the pace of discovery.

Techie Technology

Advanced Manufacturing Technologies

When traveling to other planetary bodies, each and every pound of cargo matters. If we can reduce the weight by building tools once we arrive, that’s less weight we need to launch from Earth and carry through space.

Additive manufacturing is a way of printing three-dimensional (3-D) components from a digital model. If you think of a common office printer, it uses a 2-D file to print images and text on a sheet of paper. A 3-D printer uses a 3D file to deposit thin layers of material on top of each other, creating a 3-D product.

Thanks to techies, we’re already using this technology on the International Space Station to print wrenches and other tools. Our Additive Construction for Mobile Emplacement (ACME) project is investigating ways to build structures on planetary surfaces using resources available at a given site.

Discover more about how our techies are working with advanced manufacturing HERE.

Technology Demonstrations

Our techies are always innovating and developing new cutting-edge ideas. We test these ideas in extreme environments both here on Earth and in space.  

Science missions in space require spacecraft propulsion systems that are high-performance, lightweight, compact and have a short development time. The Deep Space Engine project is looking to meet those needs. Our techies are currently testing a 100lbf (pound-force) thruster to see if this compact, lightweight, low-cost chemical propulsion system can operate at very low temperatures, which allows long duration storage capabilities.

Another technology in development is PUFFER, or the Pop-Up Flat Folding Explorer Robot…and it was inspired by origami! This robot’s lightweight design is capable of flattening itself, tucking in its wheels and crawling into places rovers can’t fit. PUFFER has been tested in a range of rugged terrains to explore areas that might be too risky for a full-fledged rover to go.

With our partners at Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp., we’ve also collaborated on the Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM), which will flight test a “green” alternative to the toxic propellant, hydrazine, in 2018. GPIM is the nation’s premier spacecraft demonstration of a new high-performance power and propulsion system — a more environmentally friendly fuel. This technology promises improved performance for future satellites and other space missions by providing for longer mission durations, increased payload mass and simplified pre-launch spacecraft processing, including safer handling and transfer of propellants.  

Find out more about our technology demonstrations HERE.

Aircraft Technology

What if you could travel from London to New York in less than 3.5 hours? Our techies’ research into supersonic flight could make that a reality! 

Currently, supersonic flight creates a disruptive, loud BOOM, but our goal is to instead create a soft “thump” so that flying at supersonic speeds could be permitted over land in the United States.

We’re conducting a series of flight tests to validate tools and models that will be used for the development of future quiet supersonic aircraft.

Did you know that with the ability to observe the location of an aircraft’s sonic booms, pilots can better keep the loud percussive sounds from disturbing communities on the ground? This display allows research pilots the ability to physically see their sonic footprint on a map as the boom occurs.

Learn more about our aircraft technology HERE.

Technology Spinoffs 

Did you know that some of the technology used in the commercial world was originally developed for NASA? For example, when we were testing parachutes for our Orion spacecraft (which will carry humans into deep space), we needed to capture every millisecond in extreme detail. This would ensure engineers saw and could fix any issues. The problem was,there didn’t exist a camera in the world that could shoot at a high enough frame rate – and store it in the camera’s memory – all while adjusting instantly from complete darkness to full daylight and withstanding the space vacuum, space radiation and water immersion after landing.

Oh…and it had to be small, lightweight, and run on low power. Luckily, techies built exactly what we needed. All these improvements have now been incorporated into the camera which is being used in a variety of non-space industries…including car crash tests, where high resolution camera memory help engineers get the most out of testing to make the cars we drive safer.

Learn about more of our spinoff technologies HERE.

Join Our Techie Team

We’re always looking for passionate and innovative techies to join the NASA team. From student opportunities to open technology competitions, see below for a list of ways to get involved:

NASA Solve is a gateway for everyone to participate in our mission through challenges, prize competition, citizen science and more! Here are a few opportunities:

Vascular Tissue Challenge 

The Vascular Tissue Challenge, a NASA Centennial Challenges competition, offers a $500,000 prize to be divided among the first three teams that successfully create thick, metabolically-functional human vascularized organ tissue in a controlled laboratory environment. More information HERE.

For open job opportunities at NASA, visit: https://nasajobs.nasa.gov

For open internship opportunities at NASA, visit: https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/stu-intern-current-opps.html

Stay tuned in to the latest NASA techie news, by following  @NASA_Technology on Twitter, NASA Technology on Facebook and visiting nasa.gov/technology.

Happy National Techies Day!

Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.

Fantasy RPG worldbuilding tip #137: mess with what counts as magic.

I don’t mean replicating modern technology with magical analogues - that stuff’s common as dirt. What I mean is taking a step back from the conventional paradigm of starting with a world that fundamentally resembles our own and layering magic on top of it, and asking yourself: what if this obviously non-magical thing is a form of magic in this world?

History furnishes numerous examples. It’s well-known, for example, that the Ancient Greeks didn’t distinguish between pharmacology and sorcery - but did you know that the Vikings considered picking locks to be a form of magic? That it’s demonstrably a mechanical skill that can be learned by anyone is beside the point; that a person was able to learn that skill in the first place was, itself, seen as evidence of consorting with evil spirits!

So run with that: pick a perfectly ordinary skill or pursuit, one that’s integral to our everyday life, and suppose that in your world, it’s a mystical practice that transgresses against the natural order. What does your world look like then?

To pose a common example: literacy. Treating literacy as a form of magic isn’t historically uncommon; the modern word “grimoire” - a book of spells - ultimately derives from the same root as “grammar”. So let’s run with that. The process and mechanics of learning to read are the same as they are in our world, but the implications may be very different. Perhaps knowing how to read books automatically confers the ability to read minds. Perhaps literacy grants the ability to understand the speech of beasts. There’s all sorts of directions you could go with it.

It’s critical to resist the urge to fall back on describing our world with magic laid on top. If you’re doing the literacy-as-magic thing, then you are not describing a world in which a reading-based school of magic exists; you are describing a world in which the acts of reading and writing are and always have been mystical practices, with all the societal weirdness that implies - and further, the mechanics of reading and writing do not materially differ from those of their real-world counterparts, though the outcomes may vary wildly.

The other major trap to watch out for is picking something too esoteric to really dig into. You’ll find plenty of fantasy settings where, say, clockworking or steam engineering is a form of magic - but clockworking isn’t something that ordinary people do in their daily lives. This sort of worldbuilding is much more effective when the practice in question is ubiquitous.

Other everyday activities that might make good candidates for converting into mystical practices:

  • Cooking or baking
  • Dressing (i.e., the act of putting on clothing)
  • Farming or gardening
  • Keeping pets
  • Lighting fires
  • Makeup (i.e., facial cosmetics)
  • Personal hygiene (bathing, grooming, etc.)
  • Representational art (that is, drawing pictures of things)
  • Rhyming (even unintentionally!)

Again, no wimping out; to pick a faintly ridiculous example from the preceding list, if you’ve decided that bathing is magic in your setting, that doesn’t mean that there’s a magical way to take a bath - it means that taking a bath is an inherently mystical process, and there’s no non-magical way to go about it. Similarly, if you went with cooking, what you’ve got is a world in which all prepared food is, in some sense, also a magic potion.

Give it a shot!

I have a new dress for you :) It comes in all 75 of WildlyMiniatureSandwich’s Sandwich palette, the white I used as a base and 5 random patterns (mostly floral).

Info

  • Basegame Compatible
  • New Mesh
  • All LoD’s
  • Everyday, formal & Party wear
  • Not available for random

Download - PSD (super simple, just separate layers for skirt/top)

Let me know if I’ve messed anything up. Feel free to recolor just don’t include the mesh.

Credits

EA for the meshes/textures I chopped up, @wildlyminiaturesandwich for the colors

Did I Shave My Legs For This?

Today I witnessed men mocking a woman for having hairy legs and underarms. I have something to say about this.

Firstly, the shaving of legs is a new fashion trend. It was done a bit in the 20′s, but honestly, it wasn’t until the forties that anyone gave a damn. Before that, no one saw your legs, because they wee covered in skirts. Men didn’t even know women HAD legs.

Slight exaggeration, but still quite meaningful.

In the last 70 years, men have gone from not knowing and not caring one bit about female body hair, to completely transforming their ideal feminine counterpart into a hairless model. Men like to tout masculinity as being impervious, but I’ll warrant you, you can watch them evolve with the feedback of marketing scams run on their little mammalian brains.

Did Queen Victoria have shaved legs…well, let’s first establish that yes, she did actually have legs. But were they hairless? During her 60-odd year reign, did she employ some servant to come pluck out her hairs?

Did Queen Elizabeth have hairless legs? 44 years of reign, at the time the longest reigning monarch of British history, but no, you’re right. She probably had the Lady of the Royal Chamber rake on a good lather before she went out in her Spanish farthingale.

Did Cleopatra have a straight razor? Did Helen of Troy? These are two women who literally destroyed nations with their beauty and the lust men had for them. Do you think they had shaved legs? What about their underarms?

Now, yes, there were traditions of removing hair. The Roman women, for example, plucked their hair out of their underarms, but I promise you…no one sat about for hours having their legs plucked with tweezers. And if they did, they had a lot of time and money to spare.

Do you know who Boudicca is? She was an Icenian queen during the first century. She led a rebellion against Roman factions at Londinium. 

Famously, she said, “This is done with the resolve of a woman. Men may live as slaves if they wish.”

She leveled three Roman outposts, well-established settlements. And came to Londinium with an army decked out in stolen Roman arms. They razed the city to the ground with fires so thick that an ash layer still exists in the stria of the City of London to this very day. As she rode through the old city on her chariot, with her Roman spear in hand, poised to launch it through the throat of a fleeing patrician, did she pause her assault to wonder…

Did I shave my legs for this?

As the man fell to the ground, choking on his own blood and the ash from the searing fires, do you think he looked up at this queen, this woman defiant and majestic, and thought, “Ye gods, what hirsuit underarms!”

I wonder how many plucked Roman women were trampled by that carriage.

I wonder if Anne Bonny, the notorious pirate ever was mocked by her male crew for having a fluffy undercarriage.

I wonder if when Annie Oakley, at 15, beat her crackshot future husband at a shooting contest, he looked at her little knees and thought, “Not this one. She’s too furry.”

I wonder if Anne Boleyn was beheaded for wearing a pair of furry britches beneath her skirts.

I wonder, if while He suckled as an infant, resplendent in holy fire and divinity, the newborn Jesus Christ, tucked His wee face to the crook of His Virgin Mother’s arm and let out a squeal at the ghastly sight of her unshaven underarms. Or if when He was installing himself in her abdomen, He gave a moment’s pause to think, “Dear Me, what am I doing, shoving myself into this horribly hairy wench?”

The answer to all of these is…No. Of course not, you fucking idiot.

Body hair exists for a reason, you stupid semi-hairless apes. Don’t you ever wonder why you still have it? I will tell you why. It provides necessary warmth, not just with insulation, but with the way your anatomy functions. Air catches the hairs and lifts them, causing a tickle that forces the follicle to swell into goose flesh, warming the skin through motion. It provides protection from the sun. And in the regions where it is thickest, it guards against the elements, keeps out parasites, and keeps your sensitive areas like your eyes, from being drowned in sweat. It even cushions and reduces the likelihood of heat rashes and chafing in the parts of you that touch. Hair is important. It wasn’t just Sampson who gained strength from it.

And I wonder, if while Sampson was laid low, his power sapped, if he looked up at the gorgeous Delilah with her treacherous shears and thought… “Why didn’t she pluck her eyebrows!”

Power is walking into a room with nothing in hand, and doing just fine.

Beauty is standing as you are, but embodying all that is graceful and powerful about the female condition.

And judging a woman on a trend that is younger then my oldest knee-length hemline is an act of such supreme stupidity and transient masculinity that I cannot even describe how ridiculous I find it. But men are the ones who are rational, yes? Men and all their manly manliness are immune to fads and trends and “girly fashion shit”, right, “bruh”?

Women have hair on their bodies same as you. You seem to do just fine wearing yours. Why do you begrudge her hers?

I say we start a new trend, where females begin to harass the worst offenders for having hairy legs. I shan’t be pleased if in 70 years, I am not seeing all men in shorts looking like the backside of a baby from the knee down. I want to see hordes of women tracking down these men who label a type of deception as beauty, and demanding they carve off their top layer of skin and fur. I want to hear these men who cannot see valor, fortitude, strength, and hair as beautiful, squeak when they walk.

And then I want all humans to embrace that which makes them soft and healthy, and stop rewriting history by turning it into one inglorious quest for vanity.

anonymous asked:

how do you do your water color~? I cant get mine to look good in my program..

Okay, so having some nice watercolour brushes helps (here are the brushes I use.) But I think that no matter what program you have, and no matter what brushes you use, as long as you try to mimic the way watercolours behave you can get a decent watercolour effect in digital art.

Here’s an example

I present to you a sketch of a random floating head because I am a serious and not at all lazy artist.

I picked a random brush (square-edged, no watercolour border) and made sure the opacity was set to low, because actual watercolours tend to lay down paint quite thinly. When people are using actual watercolour paints, they need to think about which areas to leave white, so I tried to think about this too, but only halfheartedly.

More colours! More halfhearted leaving areas white. I coloured the hair on a different layer to the skin.

I locked the opacity of the hair colour layer, and airbrushed over the area where the hair and skin meets, using the colour of the skin. This, sort of, mimicks the way that watcolours will blend into each other while they’re still wet. The reason I locked the opacity of the layer was to preserve the white spaces.

I added two multiply layers. On one I added a bit on light red for blush, on the other I added a bit of light blue for shadow. These were done with the same square, low-opacity colouring brush I used for everything else.

Using the airbrush tool, I erased the edges of the blue shadow, again to roughly mimick the way watercolours blend.

I increased the contrast. I used the levels tool to do this, but brightness/contrast should be fine too. This highlights all the rough areas in the colouring, but I think a certain amount of roughness makes it look more like natural media, so I don’t think that’s a bad thing.

I decided I’d done a shoddy job leaving white areas on the canvas, so on a new layer (under the lines, above the colours) I used the standard pen tool to draw on some white.

I also decided the lines were way too dark, so I changed the colour of the lines from black to dark brown and set the lineart layer to multiply.

Final step, add an overlay layer on top of everything with a nice texture on it (because good watercolour paper is textured.) Don’t have an appropriate texture? No problem, here’s how to make your own in any art program that has a noise filter:

1) On a new layer, fill the canvas with a medium grey (approx half-way between black and white)
2) Go to the perlin noise filter. You can play around with the settings and see what works for you, but here’s what works for me

3) Set this layer to overlay with approximately 30% opacity (again, play around and see what works for you) and you now have a lovely texture :)

And that’s it! Quick 5-minute digital watercolour doodle is complete. It’s very messy, and could definitely do with some cleaning up, but I hope you can see how it’s starting to resemble actual watercolour.

Depending on your program there may be more things you can do to mimic watercolour eg. a brush tip with rough edges tends to look more like natural media, same for a brush tip that’s textured, your program might let you set a watercolour border on either your brush or your layer (or both) and using the blend tool can also create a nice watercolour effect. But since I don’t know what program you use I tried to demonstrate a colouring technique that should work in most art programs.

I hope this helps :)

How to tell if a perfume is cheap:

If you can smell any alcohol it is a cheaply made product.

How to layer:
Eau de parfum is the stronger, most long lasting scent of the two. (Parfum vs toilette)

Then its eau de toilette.

Body mists/sprays are meant to LAYER on top of your fragrance.

The strongest is a perfume oil. Place that on your pulse points. Wrists, inside elbows, behind knees, sides of the neck, nape of the neck, behind the ears, around the armpits, décolleté/cleavage, etc. And anywhere you excrete sweat.

When you pass by a man, hug him, kiss him (on the cheek or elsewhere), he will have your scent on his mind….FOREVA.

My holiday fling used to text me saying he couldn’t get my scent out of his mind, his sheets, his car. It would drive him crazy in the best way. He would smell his hands and clothes everytime I left.

mazing iceberg

While uncommon, these stripey icebergs have a fairly simple formation process. The layers represent the original layers of snow that turned into ice to form the glacier from which this berg calved. They were of course originally horizontal. The calving happened in such a manner that there was a weight imbalance between the two halves of the berg, one being thicker than the other and the heavier half dragged the whole formation vertical as it broke off into the sea. The top layer is due to gentle erosion by the elements of the surface part, which makes the layered lower half gradually emerge until it erodes too.

Loz

Image credit: Jeff McNaill

Candy Corn Pizza


Yields 1 large pizza

The things you’ll need

Ingredients
Dough
  • 1 package active dry yeast
  • 1 ½ teaspoons sugar
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 2 ½ cups bread flour
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ¼ teaspoon onion powder
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup whole milk
  • ¼ cup shredded parmesan cheese
  • Salt and pepper to taste
Topping
  • Finely shredded mozzarella cheese
  • Finely shredded mild cheddar cheese
  • Finely shredded sharp cheddar cheese
Equipment
  • Large mixing bowl
  • Medium mixing bowl
  • Wooden spoon
  • Olive oil
  • Small mixing bowl
  • Medium pan
  • Whisk
  • Small fork
  • Rolling pin
  • Rubber spatula
  • Pizza pan
  • Clean kitchen towel

Let’s get started!

  1. Preheat oven to 450°F.
  2. In a mediumm bowl, whisk and dissolve yeast and sugar in warm water. Let stand until foamy and creamy, about 10 minutes.
  3. Stir in half of the flour, oil, and salt. Add in remaining flour and then knead until smooth. Place into a clean greased bowl and cover with a kitchen towel.
  4. To make sauce, whisk together flour, garlic, and onion powder. Melt butter in a pan over medium heat. Whisk in flour mixture until paste forms. Slowly pour in milk while continually whisking until thickened. Remove from heat and stir in parmesan. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Place dough onto a lightly floured surface and pat or roll into a large circle.
  6. Transfer dough to a lightly greased pizza pan. Prick the surface all over with a fork and bake at 450°F for 5 minutes.
  7. Remove from oven and cover dough with a thin layer of sauce. Top with cheeses in a candy corn pattern: mozzarella in the center, mild cheddar in the middle, and sharp cheddar on the outer edge.
  8. Bake again at 350°F for 8 to 10 minutes.
  9. TaDa! Get corny this Hallowee with this Candy Corn Pizza!

will--iams  asked:

Hey, could i Ask u why do u usually fill the shape of the drawing with one colour and then u color over it?

I do what is called a clipping mask, once i have the shape of the drawing in one solid color, i clip another layer on top of this one ( create a new layer, place it on top of the solid color layer, press alt+left click between the two layers).

It means that on all of the layers clipped to the solid color one, i can’t draw outside the pixels of the solid color one. here’s a gif i made that might make things clearer.

On top of the technical side, for a character, i usually make the solid layer the skin color, doing that makes it easier to choose colors for the hair, the clothes, etc, etc. At least for me it does

Sheith Music Comparison
S2E1 + S4E1
Sheith Music Comparison

I was watching S4E1 again when something familiar about the hug scene struck me — but I couldn’t quite put my finger on it. I had to isolate the background music from this episode, as well as “Across the Universe”, and it hit me.

The musical composition of both the campfire scene in S2E1 and the convo between Shiro and Keith before the Hug 2.0 are… very similar.

Both feature an atmospheric, “space ambience” with soft, slowly rhythmic, low-tone notes layered on top.

1) The first audio clip is from the campfire scene in Across the Universe. The notes hit towards the end of their conversation, as Shiro proclaims Keith as his successor, Keith reassures him that he’s gonna be okay, and Shiro gives him one of the softest looks we’ve seen in the whole series.

2) The second audio clip is from S4E1, and is a bit different. The notes kick in the exact moment Shiro places his hand on Keith’s shoulder, after Keith announces that Shiro can now pilot Black again & lead the team. This conversation, while in the public eye, was very much carried between these two at this point. The music crescendos in perfect time with their movements as they go in for the hug–one prominent note when their hands clasp, and one when they embrace. Again, I reiterate: these notes did not initially kick in until Shiro put his hand on Keith’s shoulder.

I’m not saying it might not have been played elsewhere in the series (I’m not gonna rewatch all four seasons to check). But here are a couple of other observations I found as follows:

For instance, Matt & Pidge had space atmosphere, similar piano-esque notes & strings in their reunion. But the notes were a bit different (gradually getting higher, if memory serves correctly) and the strings soon became a central instrument. Therefore, this seems mostly irrelevant to me.

Zarkon and Haggar are characterized by space ambience and strong, slow notes as well, though a little higher-pitched. In the flashback ep, this is noticeable three times: when they meet (though it is VERY faint), when Zarkon is at her bedside, and when they both die with their fingers interlaced.

Do with this info what you will, but I did find it very… interesting.

Curious to see if any moments between them moving forward have similar instruments/tones.