lawrence-livermore-national-laboratory

There are thousands of films of the nuclear age. They document the 210 atmospheric nuclear tests the United States conducted between 1945 and 1962.

Until recently, these government-commissioned films had been scattered around different archives, though the bulk of them sat in boxes at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Fortunately, a team of physicists and film archivists at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California decided to digitize the films before it was too late.

Digitization Unearths New Data From Cold War-Era Nuclear Test Films

Image: YouTube/Screenshot by NPR

Inside an underground nuclear explosion created cavity, 1961.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Project Gnome, the first nuclear Plowshare experiment, was designed to explore the feasibility of using a deeply buried explosion in a dry salt bed for energy recovery and scientific nuclear experiments. The 3.1-kiloton device was detonated at a depth of 360 meters near Carlsbad, New Mexico. A researcher explores the created cavity, 23 meters high with a diameter of 49 meters.

photo: llnl/flickr

Mathematician and pioneering software developer Phyllis Cady Johnson (right) and two unknown women working on an IBM calculating machine, date unknown. Johnson specialized in nuclear mathematics, first working at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and later Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where she worked on the Manhattan Project and later went on to a career developing scientific software for the Atomic Energy Commission.

American energy use, in one diagram
Spring brings new growth, new possibilities, and, best of all, a new spaghetti diagram from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the Department of Energy. Every year, LLNL produces a new energy flow chart showing the sources of US energy, what it’s used for, and how much of it is wasted. Read more
usatoday.com
Attackers sever fiber-optic cables in San Francisco area, latest in a string
Someone deliberately severed two AT&T fiber optic cables in the Livermore, Calif., Monday night, the latest in a string of attacks against the Internet's privately run backbone.

Someone deliberately severed two AT&T fiber optic cables in the Livermore, Calif., Monday night, the latest in a string of attacks against the Internet’s privately run backbone.

AT&T is offering a $250,000 reward in connection with the latest attacks. AT&T’s fiber optic network is legally considered a critical piece of the nation’s Internet infrastructure, and any attackers are subject to both state and federal prosecution. The FBI already has an open investigation into 14 similar attacks on California Internet backbones since last summer.

Livermore is a San Francisco Bay Area suburb that’s home to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and many high-tech commuters.

“It’s a serious matter and affects public safety at large,” AT&T spokesman Jim Greersaid Tuesday.

The high-capacity lines, which aren’t much thicker than a pencil, carry vast amounts of data. Everything from phone calls to computer transactions, emails, and even the security cameras feeds watching the cables themselves travel down the plastic or glass fibers as pulses of light. The cables are the interstate highways of the information superhighway.

The FBI says whoever has been attacking the cables usually opens a underground vault, climbs inside and then cuts through the cables’ protective metal conduit before severing the lines themselves.

“It’s being taken very seriously by the FBI and our law enforcement partners,” said Michele Ernst, a spokeswoman for the bureau’s San Francisco field office.

Security experts say the attacks could be the work of a disgruntled employee or of terrorists probing the nation’s infrastructure to see how long repairs take. FBI officials say it’s possible whoever has been attacking the cables is dressed as a utility company employee.

change.org
IUPAC, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Name new element 117 Octarine, in honour of Terry Pratchett's Discworld
This petition is to name element 117, recently confirmed by the International Union of Applied Chemistry, as 'Octarine', with the proposed symbol Oc (pronounced 'ook'), in honour of the late Terry Pratchett and his Discworld series of books. The Discworld series has sold more than 70 million books worldwide, in 37 different languages. Terry Pratchett died in 2015 and his final book, The Shepherd's Crown, was published in the same year. He was well-known as a lover of science and, with two well-known science writers, co-wrote a series of four books called The Science of the Discworld, which took a sideways look at 'roundworld' (Earth) science. Octarine, in the Discworld books, is known as 'the colour of magic', which forms the title of Pratchett's first ever Discworld book. According to Disc mythology, octarine is visible only to wizards and cats, and is generally described as a sort of greenish-yellow purple colour, which seems perfect for what will probably be the final halogen in the periodic table. Octarine is also a particularly pleasing choice because, not only would it honour a world-famous and much-loved author, but it also has an 'ine' ending, consistent with the other elements in period 17. Octarine is being counted as 'a mythological concept' under IUPAC rules, which state that elements must be named after "a mythological concept or character; a mineral, or similar substance; a place or geographical region; a property of the element; or a scientist". The Discworld stories are certainly stories about gods and heroes, and 70 million books surely count for something.

Like the idea? Go sign the petition. I did.

http://nerdi.st/1Yc09O0

Scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California recently released a study theorizing a laser hotter than the sun. Let that sink in for a minute. A solid, controlled beam of energy that is hotter than the sun in the hands of a human. Super villains all over the world are…

#Fusion, #LawrenceLivermoreNationalLaboratory, #NuclearFusion, #Science, #TheoreticalPhysics

Sequoia Throws Petaflops at Fusion Simulation

by Txchnologist Staff

One of the world’s fastest supercomputers has performed a record number of simulations to help physicists in their quest to produce fusion energy.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers set all of their Sequoia supercomputer’s 1,572,864 processors (known as cores) on a single problem: modeling the motion of charged particles after a powerful laser beam strikes a dense cloud of ionized gas, called plasma. Using all of its cores, Sequoia can process 16.3 quadrillion calculations per second.

The machine is letting the team follow the simultaneous evolution of tens of billions to trillions of individual particles and the electromagnetic interactions between them. Such simulations are used extensively in plasma physics.

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What looks like frozen smoke and is the lightest solid material on the planet? 

Via boingboing – There’s a petition to name one of the newest elements in the periodic table “octarine,” after the color of magic in Terry Pratchett’s books:

A new Change.org petition to the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (which has naming rights for element 117) asks them to name the new element in Terry Pratchett’s honour, as a remembrance of his early death in 2015.

The petition asks that the new element be dubbed “Octarine” (the imaginary colour of magic from the novel of the same name), abbreviated Oc (pronounced “ook” in honour of Unseen University's librarian).

The fact that you’d pronounce it “ook” is just … chocolate on the frozen banana. I SECOND THIS MOTION!!

– Petra

change.org
IUPAC, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Name new element 117 Octarine, in honour of Terry Pratchett's Discworld
This petition is to name element 117, recently confirmed by the International Union of Applied Chemistry, as 'Octarine', with the proposed symbol Oc (pronounced 'ook'), in honour of the late Terry Pratchett and his Discworld series of books.