laurelton

Say No To This

(A Laurens prequel to the real Say No To This.)

Laurens: I just got another letter,
G-d I thought that he’d get better now he’s married to Eliza,
She will make for him the best wife,
He’s so lucky to have her in his life,
I love him too well to bring them strife —
I gotta write him and tell him ‘no’
Tell him that we’ve gotta let go
Tear his heart from mine, we both gotta say ‘no’
I’ll be fine. He was never mine -

Alexander: You’re lyin’.

Laurens: It’ll ruin your reputation
Sodomy so high in the nation?
He ignores me, tells my frustration —

Alexander: It’s love, how can it sinful?

Laurens: The preachers all swear that it’s dreadful.
(speaking) Thou shalt not lie with a man the lyings of a woman —

Alexander: I never said we’d take it Eliza’s bed,
C’mon let’s head to yours instead.

Laurens: So he lead me to my bed,
let his legs spread, and said —

Alexander: Staaaaay.

Laurens: Hey ~
Lord, show me how to say ‘no’ to this,
I know I oughta say ‘no’ to this,
But, my G-d, he makes me helpless,
And my body keeps tellin’ me “Hell, yes.”
Do you know what my father will say if he learns what we’ve done?
He’ll say “I take comfort in the thought that I once had a son.”

Alexander: Give me the power to show that I love you by actions rather than words.

Laurens: Lord, show me how to say ‘no’ to this,
I know I oughta say ‘no’ to this,
In my mind I’m tryin’ to go,

Ensemble: Go, go, go

Laurens: But his mouth is on mine,
I do not say -

Ensemble: No!

Laurens: Yes!

Ensemble: No!

Laurens: Yes!

Nobody has to know.

Alexander: Yes.

Feeding the Flamingoes leaded-glass window, c. 1892

Louis Comfort Tiffany Living room, Laurelton Hall, Long Island, New York, 1902–57
Exhibited: World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893
Maiden feeding flamingoes in the court of a Roman house
Leaded glass
Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company, New York City, 1892–1900
Marks, lower right: Tiffany Glass & Dec. Co. 333–341 Fourth Ave N.Y.
60 x 43 in.
(U-072)  The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art 



Description and image from:  Morse Museum  “Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) casts the flamingo in at least four works in the Museum’s collection, but the most prominent are the Feeding the Flamingoes leaded-glass window, c. 1892, and a watercolor that preceded it in 1888. A virtuoso glass performance, the Feeding the Flamingoes window depicts materials from hard stone and tile to spouting water and soft fabric (folded, so-called “drapery” glass). Its ambitious design includes plating (multiple layers of glass) and hundreds of extremely small, hard-to-handle bits of glass, particularly in the flowers behind the flamingoes. In the two related works—composed on a diagonal axis to create shadow and even a hint of mystery—Tiffany is clearly telling us that the virginal young lady he has placed in this picturesque scene is, like the flamingo, beautiful, balanced, and graceful. The pink in her cheeks reveals her health just as the pink of flamingoes reflects theirs. The well-traveled Tiffany was understandably enamored of this elegant wading bird he no doubt knew from parts of Africa, southern Asia, and southern Europe—exotic places that inspired the artist throughout his life. He even kept stuffed flamingoes in his studio in New York City. Both the window and watercolor were exhibited at the world’s fair in Chicago in 1893 and eventually came home to the artist’s country estate, Laurelton Hall.” (morse museum)



Related post:   HERE



Things I’m grateful for in fandoms

Hamilton:

 -The people in the fandom were creative enough for one of the ship names to        be “Lams” before it was turned into “Laurelton”, “Hamens”, or even worse…          “Lamilton”.

 -People got interested in history like the musical wanted you to do, and people     went around and shared some cool facts. Like how Peggy and Alex had made     a dating advice book for women, or how Eliza verbally destroyed everyone who   had bad history with Alex and came to apologize for his death.

Star vs the Forces of Evil:

 -Everyone is like “Eclipsa is so cute!” and I’m just hoping for the moment her inevitable betrayal comes in and everyone who trusted her too quickly starts screaming

 -”Rest in Ashes you evil Smurf Gnome”

Camp Camp:

 -Everyone just collectively wishes for David to adopt Max in the situation that       Max’s parents aren’t good people and it brings a happy tear to my eye

 -”GIVE HIM THE BEAR”

 -”I THOUGHT THIS WAS A KIDS’ SHOW!”

 -Everyone agrees that the pink haired girl in the “cursed” episode needs more       attention

To The Moon: 

 -This Is My City Now

Taming the Flamingo (also known as Feeding the Flamingoes), 1888
Art gallery, Laurelton Hall, Long Island, New York, 1902–57
Exhibited: World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893
Watercolor on paper
Louis Comfort Tiffany, American, 1848–1933
Signed, lower left: Louis C. Tiffany 88
35 ½ x 23 in.
Morse Museum, (85-011)
         



Description and image from the Morse Museum:  “Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) casts the flamingo in at least four works in the Museum’s collection, but the most prominent are the Feeding the Flamingoes leaded-glass window, c. 1892, and a watercolor that preceded it in 1888. A virtuoso glass performance, the Feeding the Flamingoes window depicts materials from hard stone and tile to spouting water and soft fabric (folded, so-called “drapery” glass). Its ambitious design includes plating (multiple layers of glass) and hundreds of extremely small, hard-to-handle bits of glass, particularly in the flowers behind the flamingoes. In the two related works—composed on a diagonal axis to create shadow and even a hint of mystery—Tiffany is clearly telling us that the virginal young lady he has placed in this picturesque scene is, like the flamingo, beautiful, balanced, and graceful. The pink in her cheeks reveals her health just as the pink of flamingoes reflects theirs. The well-traveled Tiffany was understandably enamored of this elegant wading bird he no doubt knew from parts of Africa, southern Asia, and southern Europe—exotic places that inspired the artist throughout his life. He even kept stuffed flamingoes in his studio in New York City. Both the window and watercolor were exhibited at the world’s fair in Chicago in 1893 and eventually came home to the artist’s country estate, Laurelton Hall”  (via: morse museum)


Related post:   HERE



7

KELLS: No, let’s see where she goes. Mara, who did you hurt?

Mara: My teacher.

KELLS: What was her name?

Mara: Morales.

Mr. ___: Her file says that her teacher, Christina Morales, died of anaphylactic shock in reaction to fire ant bites on [date redacted].

KELLS: Let me see.

Mara: Also a … a man. He hurt a dog. I—I—

KELLS: It’s okay. Take your time. Just tell us what you remember.

Mara: Rachel.

Mr. ___: Rachel Watson, deceased, died Wednesday [date redacted] in Laurelton. Remains discovered at six a.m. with those of—

Mara: Claire.

Mr. ____: Claire Lowe, yes, as well as her brother, Jude Lowe—

Mara: Noah.

Mr.____: Noah Shaw? I don't—

KELLS: Quiet.

-Retribution of Mara Dyer

Fuck Sleep...

guess im not sleeping tonight

i wassss sleepin but i woke up and listened to the news and i heard about a rapist in my neighborhood like deadass around the corner like near my bus stop….smfh! 

they said he’s on the loose now…O_o

so naturally i started thinking crazy shit like what if its some guy that i see around the hood all the time…what if he decides to come through windows and shit

WTF

im mad paranoid…

but anyway…night light’s on

and im back on tumblr

Photo: "Theatre Gold"

This theatre was part of a facility for feeble-minded women, particularly between the ages of 16 and 45.  It was designed to detain, segregate, care for and train these women and operated from 1920 to 1998. 
 

Despite the hospital’s dark history, this theatre was quite beautiful. I loved the worn texture of the wooden seats, the missing tiles on the ceiling playing a game of Tetris and the beautiful massive windows with gaudy golden draperies.