late rococo

Hugo Simberg, The Garden of Death, 1896.

Disney’s Belle is an Asshole

The other day I realized that Disney’s Belle is actually an asshole.

Let me explain:

Disney’s Beauty and the Beast probably takes place in the mid to late 1700s France (Baroque, Rococo, blunderbuss, monarchy, crude steam technology but there are anachronisms).

At that time, France was mostly illiterate unless you were rich.

Her father has NO JOB. Belle has NO JOB. They live in a beautiful cottage (with basement, main floor and upstairs)  with a horse, chickens, 3 goats, a cart, private well, watermill and it’s well furnished too.

Everyday she goes to the the bookshop where the owner lets her BORROW books rather than buy them. She wanders around town reading and dumping on the town and people around her because they’re boring to her because they do the same thing every day.

Why is Belle literate? How does her father support her and his inventions?

They own books, they own a massive globe, a telescope and other things no peasant would have.

In the original story, Belle’s father used to be a merchant before he lost his vast fortune. This is the only possible explanation for her literacy and cushy situation, they must be living off the remnants of their fortune and Maurice must have previously been a merchant (hence the massive globe, telescope, astrolabe and merchant scales in his workshop).

Belle calls them “little people” ( “Little town, Full of little people”). 

They’re new to the town (”Every morning just the same, Since the morning that we came”) and the town folk think her and her father and weirdos. Belle thinks of them all as poor (“To this poor provincial town”).

One of her criticisms of the Beast is that he’s “unrefined”. What peasant complains about someone being unrefined? Belle does because she’s not a peasant.

It’s a very anti-peasant movie. Most of the male population of the village is murdered or maimed when they try to attack the castle. Belle effectively destroys the town she hates so much when she shows them the Beast in the mirror. Resquiat in pace, Baker-with-your-tray-like-always.

In other words, Belle has no thoughts in her head about money, she’s not worried about it. She’s literate and feels comfortable dumping on the poor people of the town that have no leisure time and can’t read. You know, for having JOBS that they have to do every day. Belle is a pampered, merchant class asshole that has no idea that her father might have moved them to this town for monetary reasons, and that everyone in town can’t spend all day reading.= because they need to make money to pay for things.

4

Didn’t think much of Beauty and The Beast – but fuck – the costume design was incredible. It got me thinking a lot about late baroque/rococo fashion and how indulgent and elaborate court dress became. Stumbled upon these INCREDIBLE paper fop wigs by Asya Kozina. Holy shit they’re good!

Now all I want to do is casually wear a giant ship on my head to celebrate a naval victory.

cell113  asked:

Numbah 5!!!! And also 2 if you comfy with it cause pencil cases are cute.

2: Show your pencilcase and what’s inside.

From the outside it’s a somewhat cute little pink thing with two embroidered albino rabbits on the front and a golden faux leather hem around the zip.

On the inside on the other hand, it’s a literal rubbish dump.

5: Who/what inspires you?

Well a lot inspires me: tolkien’s writing and peter jackson’s films, of course,  forests, historical fashion(especially celtic,old slavic,rococo and late victorian era clothing), caves, the Barrandien area where i live, my beloved Dartmoor in england, the colour red, rocks, the taste of metal, irish music or the Hamilton musical, food, my best friend, school, all my tumblr mutals, birds, random youtube binge watching, the smell behind my cats ears, sneezing, beer, camp fires, dark rooms with little light or new art supplies. 

Édouard Manet, The Suicide, 1877-81.

Mathias J. Alten, The Color Mixer, 1908.

Helen Frankenthaler, Jacob’s Ladder, 1957.

Sir William Russell Flint, The Red Portfolio, c. 1920.