late egyptian

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Extremely Rare Gold Coin of the Pharaoh Nektanebo II: One of Few Examples of the Only Truly Egyptian Coin

This is a gold daric or stater from Egypt under the rule of Nectanebo II, struck circa 395-340 BC. It has the image of a prancing horse on the obverse. The reverse bears two hieroglyphs: a collar with six beads (nub = gold) and a heart and windpipe (nefer = good). Extremely rare, among the finest of few specimens known. A fascinating issue of great interest and about extremely fine/extremely fine. It sold at auction in 2009 for 120,810 USD.

Perhaps the most advanced of all ancient civilizations, Egypt, was among the most resistant to the use of coinage. The first indications of its use do not occur until late in Egyptian history, roughly the latter part of the 26th Dynasty (672-525 BC).

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MYTHOLOGY MEME - [1/?] EGYPTIAN GODS/GODDESSES: BASTET

“My Goddess -Cat, with cold intuitive heart,

I feel your moon-breaths oread on me above.

Let me touch your silver glow circle,

make my mind open for this wonder." 

Bronze aegis of the goddess Isis, showing the goddess wearing a tripartite wig with twelve uraeus-serpents.  Artist unknown; 30th Dynasty (Late Period, 380-343 BCE).  Found at Saqqara; now in the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, University College London.  Photo credit: Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin/Wikimedia Commons.

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One of the most exquisite works at the National Archaeology Museum in Athens. The intricate inlaid wire patterns cover her body in patterns perfectly fit for body tattoos.

Statue of the princess-priestess Takushit Copper alloy hollow cast Late Period, end of 25th Dynasty, ca. 670 BC The long, diaphanous robe, which is decorated all over with incised patterns that were filled with precious metal wires (technique of damasking), accentuates the beautifully shaped, sensuous body.

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Ma’at represents both the Egyptian concepts of and personification of truth, order, balance, justice and harmony. Isfet is her ideological counterpart, representing lies, chaos, violence, injustice and disharmony.

The sun-god Ra came from the primaeval mound of creation only after he set his daughter Maat in place of Isfet. If Isfet were to rise, humanity would decay and return to a primordial state.

↳ day four: ma’at and isfet

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Rare Egyptian Bronze Cat Nursing Kittens, Late Dynastic, C. 712-343 BC

A cast bronze fragment of a piece that was perhaps a cuff or applique.

The ancient Egyptians, rather uniquely among the world’s civilizations, had an obsession with cats, both tame and fierce, large and small. Cats were domesticated to help protect crops from pests in Cyprus or possibly Mesopotamia (it is difficult to interpret the archaeological record on this matter for a variety of reasons), but the Egyptian’s love of cats seems to have gone above and beyond that of their contemporaries. The cemetery at Hierakonpolis includes a cat skeleton in a pre-Dynastic tomb (c. 3700 BC) that had a broken left humerus and right femur that seem to have been set by a human and allowed to heal before that cat’s ultimate death.

The first illustration of a cat with a collar comes from a 5th Dynasty (c. 2500 to 2350 BC) Egyptian tomb at Saqqara. Cats were the most frequently mummified animal in Egypt and there were multiple feline goddesses, including the domesticated cat-form Bastet. Bronze statues like this one may have been direct offerings or appeals to Bastet.

Golden pendant with repoussé decoration, bearing a portrait of Alexander the Great.  Artist unknown; 4th cent. CE.  Found at Aboukir, Egypt; now in the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.  Photo credit: Walters Art Museum.

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Why is no one talking about the fact that The Book of Breathings in ACOMAF is named after the Egyptian Book of Breathings which, consequently, are several late, ancient Egyptian funerary texts that is intended to enable deceased people to exist in the afterlife. I mean this seems kind of an important clue. maybe? 

In ancient Egypt  “breathing” was a metaphorical term for all the aspects of life that the deceased hoped to experience again in the afterlife.

Could the book Feyre has actually be related to this same idea? 

The first piece that Feyre, well she basically steals it, and that half of the book says the following: “hello liar” “Will you read me?” to which Feyre responds “NO” the book then says “Unmade and Made; Made and Unmade–that is the cycle. Like calls to like”. Then it calls her “Cursebreaker” The first half of the book is described as cold, cunning, heartless.

The Second half of the book comes to Feyre from a sympathetic mortal queen it sings to her: Life and death and rebirth, Sun and moon and dark, Rot and bloom and bones, Hello, Sweet thing. Hello, lady of night. Hello, princess of decay. Hello, fanged beast and trembling fawn. Love me, touch me, sing me. This half of the book is described as Madness, Chaos, Disorder, and Lawlessness, Joy and Despair.

When Feyre takes the Book of Breathings with her to nullify the cauldron the book has this to say: “Sweet-tongued liar, lady of many faces—You see now, princess of carrion–you see what you must do”

This book is the only one that can nullify the Cauldron and apart each half could be said to represent a different side of creation and together it would represent the whole of creation.

The Cauldron is described as “absence, and presence. Darkness and whatever the darkness had come from. But NOT LIFE. Not joy or light or hope”. 

Does the Cauldron then represent death and the afterlife? When Feyre is telling the Bone Carver about where she went after she died she describes darkness. She said “There was nothing in the dark, but that it was not frightening.”

Feyre has already died once and been reborn, remade, from the powers of the 7 High Lords. What if those 7 High Lords each represent the 7 Gods of the Underworld/Afterlife. What if being remade by all 7 of them makes her the only person not just able to read the Book of Breathings but to truly command the Cauldron as well. 

You can not have life without death, you cannot have death without life the two are inextricably intertwined together. Yet for us mortals and the fae alike there is a moment, a bridge between the two that we must pass over to reach the other side of our existence from life to death. What if Feyre has become that bridge?

The Book of Breathings says 4 times to Feyre “Take us home” It tells her it must be “joined together”. 

I don’t know I’m just speculating at this point so if ya’ll have any ideas you wanna throw my way or you have a different spin feel free to jump in.

consequently the first chapter in the third book A court of Wings and Ruin is titled Princess of Carrion.

@propshophannah @teamfeyre @crochanblackbeak @princevvhitethorn @hermajestymanon

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Egyptian Gold Amulet of Sobek-Re, Late Period, 664-332 BC

The crocodile god Sobek was worshiped in the region of Thebes and particularly in the Fayum. Bronze figures of Sobek-Re, wearing the sun disc and uraeus, were offered in the sanctuaries of the region. Crocodile amulets were also offered in funerary ceremonies for protection from water-borne perils. The lack of suspension loop or piercing suggests this amulet was placed within the mummy wrappings. 2 cm long

Ancient Egyptian stele, dedicated by the doorman of Horudja temple in honor of the divine bull Apis.  Artist unknown; 643 BCE (= Year 21 of Psamtik [Psammetichus] I, first pharaoh of the 26th [Saite] Dynasty).  Found at the Serapeum of Saqqara; now in the Louvre.  Photo credit: Rama/Wikimedia Commons.