large-format-view-camera

The Restorers at San Lorenzo Maggiore, Naples


Artist: Thomas Struth (German, born Geldern, 1954)

Date: 1988

Medium: Chromogenic print

Image: 119.1 x 159.7 cm (46 7/8 x 62 7/8 in.) Frame: 48 × 63 in. (121.9 × 160 cm)

Credit Line: Purchase, Vital Projects Fund Inc. Gift, through Joyce and Robert Menschel; Alfred Stieglitz Society Gifts; Jennifer Saul Gift; Gift of Dr. Mortimer D. Sackler, Theresa Sackler and Family; and Gary and Sarah Wolkowitz Gift, 2010 © Thomas Struth

Accession Number: 2010.121 - The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Description and image from The Metropolitan Museum of Art:  "The working method Struth devised for The Restorers, one of his first portraits, would become his standard procedure: photographing only subjects he could get to know over an extended period and collaborate with on how they wished to be seen. He also decided to focus on couples or groups defined by a shared history—often familial—or a communality of purpose, as with this portrait of four art restorers he befriended in Naples.


The setting they chose was the restorers’ current work place—the former refectory of a church then being used as a staging area for paintings from the surrounding area that had been damaged in a recent earthquake. The almost hypnotic effect achieved in this picture is due not only to the artist’s intimacy with his subjects and their own understanding of his aims but also to his technical choices. Struth uses a large-format view camera on a tripod, which, with its oversize negatives and slow exposure time allows for a tremendous amount of detail, and the shallow depth of field subtly pushes the four figures into the space of the viewer.”  (met)



5

Laura Plageman (USA) - Response

Laura Plageman is an artist and educator who lives and works in Oakland, CA. Her images explore the relationships between the process of image making, photographic truth and distortion, and the representation of landscape. She is interested in making pictures that examine the natural world as a scene of mystery, beauty, and constant change - transformed both by human presence and by its own design:

“In th series Response, I am responding to photographs both as representations and tangible objects. Through physically altering enlarged prints and then re-photographing the results, I create works that oscillate between image and object, photography and sculpture, landscape and still life. While they may appear illusory, the resulting pictures are documents of actual events and are thus as authentic as the original representational images contained within.

My process unfolds through observation and experimentation – I let the image and its materiality dictate its direction. Playing with paper and with light in unplanned and organic ways, I look for new ways to perceive the space, form, and context of my subjects. In some works, large pieces of the original image are torn out while in others, smaller parts are more subtly altered. I use a large format view camera throughout my process so I can control perspective and record as much detail as possible. Whether focused on a ripped paper edge or a nesting bird, I hope to reach a place where picture elements interact and merge in unpredictable and expressive ways.”

© All images courtesy the artist

[more Laura Plageman | artist found at Juxtapoz]

Black Square XI,” 2012. In captivity, many birds develop Feather Destructive Behavior as a result of conditions including lack of psychological and emotional stimulation, stress, lack of companionship, and limited freedom. Amiga is a blue-and-gold macaw suffering from this condition. Image created using large-format view camera with Phase-One digital back.

Photograph by Taryn Simon, whose work appears in “From Darkroom to Daylight,” by Harvey Wang, edited by Amy Brost and Edmund Carson, out this month from Daylight Books:

Film in many ways allowed bad taste or bad decisions to still look good, because it had a forgiving and beautiful baseline. In digital, bad taste or bad decisions are glaring and rampant.

Read more excerpts from the book on newyorker.com.