large magellanic cloud

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Milky way and Large Magellanic Cloud panorama over Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

SN 1987A

This artist’s impression of the material around a recently exploded star, known as Supernova 1987A (or SN 1987A), is based on observations which have for the first time revealed a three dimensional view of the distribution of the expelled material. The observations were made by astronomers using ESO’s Very Large Telescope. The original blast was not only powerful, according to the new results. It was also more concentrated in one particular direction.This is a strong indication that the supernova must have been very turbulent, supporting the most recent computer models. This image shows the different elements present in SN 1987A: two outer rings, one inner ring and the deformed, innermost expelled material.

Just how a supernova explodes is not very well understood, but the way the star exploded is imprinted on this inner material. The astronomers could deduce that this material was not ejected symmetrically in all directions, but rather seems to have had a preferred direction. Besides, this direction is different to what was expected from the position of the rings.

Image credit: ESO / L. Calçada

What created this gigantic hole? The emission nebula N44 in our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud has a large, 250 light-year hole and astronomers are trying to figure out why. One possibility is particle winds expelled by massive stars in the bubble’s interior that are pushing out the glowing gas. This answer was found to be inconsistent with measured wind velocities. Another possibility is that the expanding shells of old supernovas have sculpted the unusual space cavern. An unexpected clue of hot X-ray emitting gas was recently been detected escaping the N44 superbubble. The featured image was taken in three very specific colors by the huge 8-meter Gemini South Telescope. 

Image Credit & Copyright: Gemini Obs., AURA, NSF

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Airglow above European Southern Observatory (ESO)

Here are gorgeous fulldome views above different telescopes of ESO’s La Silla Observatory in northern Chile. The red and green hues are produced by airglow, waves of alternating air pressure which are caused by various processes in the upper atmosphere. The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds are also visible while Milky Way cuts across the sky.

Credit: P. Horálek/ESO

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Explore the darkness around Wellington, New Zealand - great galactic shots in here including the Magellanic Clouds

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After chasing it for more than two years I was finally rewarded with two displays of Aurora Australis (Southern lights) within a week visible from Mornington peninsula, not far from Melbourne. The nights were warm an clear and the Moon was not in the sky either - I could not have asked for better conditions.
The red color of this aurora is caused by the charged particles from the Sun exciting oxygen atoms high in the Earth’s atmosphere. …
Being able to photograph it all night I came up with a nice video. The brighter Aurora happened on January 22nd and the smaller one, featured in the middle section, was from January 16th, followed by a rather bright Moonrise.

30 Doradus, located in the heart of the Tarantula nebula, is the brightest star-forming region in our galactic neighborhood. The nebula resides 170,000 light-years away in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Links to very large images in comments.

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I never like videos that boomerang but still had to share this one - stars rotating over a dead, undecomposed tree in Sossusvlei, Namibia - you can clearly make out the large and small Magellanic Clouds - two minor galaxies close to the Milky Way.

This shot from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows a maelstrom of glowing gas and dark dust within one of the Milky Way’s satellite galaxies, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). This stormy scene shows a stellar nursery known as N159, an HII region over 150 light-years across. N159 contains many hot young stars.