languages,

Emotions in Swedish

Since I got a request to to a vocab list for emotions/feelings etc. in Swedish, here it is, and I hope it’s what you were after :)

Jag mår bra/dåligt-I feel good/bad

Jag mår illa-I feel nauseous

Jag känner mig-I feel

Jag är-I am

Trött-Tired

Sömnig-Sleepy

Utmattad-Exhausted

Lättad-Relieved

Arg-Angry

På dåligt humör-In a bad mood

På bra humör-In a good mood

Glad-Happy

Uttråkad-Bored

Orolig-Worried

Irriterad-Irritated

Spänd-Tense

Nervös-Nervous

Ängslig-Anxious

Besviken-Disappointed

Upphetsad/exalterad-Excited

Förvirrad-Confused

Fundersam-Thoughtful

Förvånad-Surprised

Upprörd-Upset

Frustrerad-Frustrated

Förtjust-Delighted

Nyfiken-Curious

Worth noting, thoughtful can also mean omtänksam (thoughtful as in caring) And surprised can also be överraskad. Surprise!-Överraskning! 

Other feeling-words, that don’t work with Jag är/jag känner mig-sentences (some work if they are in another form, ex. Rädsla->Rädd):

Beundra-Admire

Fientlig-Hostile

Glädje-Joy

Medkänsla-Compassion

Pinsam-Embarrassing

Skräck-Horror

Rädsla-Fear

Skam-Shame

Ånger-Regret

Vemod-Feelings of happiness and sadness at the same time (like if a child moves away from home the parent can feel vemod)

Looking for English native speakers!

Name: Naomi
Age: 20
I am a native speaker of: German
I want to practice: English

Hey everybody! I’m a university student from Germany! I study Applied Computer Science which is less boring than it probably sounds :D
I would really love to talk (voice chat) with some English native speakers since I never get the opportunity to practice my English in real life! At the moment I only feel comfortable talking to other women, sorry! Since my English is a little rusty and I can get a bit shy in the beginning I hope you will be patient with me!

I would prefer talking on Discord but Skype is just fine with me.

A little about myself:

My interests include reading (classical literature, historical fiction, thrillers, non-fiction etc.), writing (my own stories/novellas), cooking and baking, travelling, learning languages and doing sports. I also like doing a lot of volunteer work, at the moment I work at an animal shelter and help my university’s LGBT organisation. I’ve also helped promote cancer and mental health awareness with other organisations in the past.

I would describe myself as a fairly easy-going person. I enjoy talking about all kinds of topics, ranging from small talk to deep conversation! Don’t be afraid of asking a lot of questions or telling me all about your day, I will probably do the same! I also enjoy just sharing our life stories or interesting anecdotes!

Although I don’t think we need to share many interests in order to have good conversations, I’m going to list some of my favourites (this is so not going to be comprehensive!)

TV Shows: Monty Python’s Flying Circus, Hannibal, Jeeves&Wooster, Little Britain, Sherlock, Merlin, cartoon shows like South Park/Family Guy/American Dad, A Little Bit of Fry&Laurie, RuPaul’s Drag Race (current obsession!) …

Movies: Anything Tarantino, Snowden, Tim Burton movies…

Books: Harry Potter, Oscar Wilde, E.A.Poe, Lovecraft, Hemingway, Stephen Fry, Jules Vernes, Artemis Fowl, Bartimaeus Triology and a lot more

Video games: the Sims, GTA V, Mafia III, Starbound, Stardew Valley, Tomb Raider/Lara Croft…

If you think you might be interested in talking to me, please write to me at naomiko [at] gmx [.] de and I will give you my Skype/Discord ID!

Naturally, if you study German I will help you with that as much as I can! :D

Thank you for reading! Have an awesome day! :D 

I fucking hate languages.

The Greeks had this word, right, we have no idea where it came from, it just kinda popped up out of nowhere, and it could mean either apples, cheeks, or boobs. Problem is it looked and sounded *exactly* like another, unrelated word which could mean sheep, goat, or any animal in general really, which must have got confusing if you were a farmer talking about your livestock, but anyway…

Then the Romans, having stolen practically everything else from the Greeks, thought they’d nick this word too, because Latin isn’t confusing enough without throwing in a bunch of loan words. And they adopted it to mean a pumpkin.

Then the English came along and were all like “when in Rome”, and stole it, where it became our word ‘melon’. Which has now come back to mean boobs.

How do you like them apples.

3

Pilot, the real-time universal translator, is straight out of a sci-fi novel

  • The ability to understand someone speaking a foreign language could soon be as easy as wearing a new earpiece.
  • Waverly Labs is behind an earpiece called the Pilot that is eerily similar in scope to Star Trek’s Universal Translator  that allows individuals to translate languages in real-time.
  • The smart earpiece works by canceling out ambient noise to concentrate on what is being said by a speaker
  • And then funnels that data to a complementary app that screens it for translation and speech synthesis, according to its website.
  • Pilot isn’t the first — and likely won’t be the last — piece of tech made for the translation marketplace.
  • However, where this device really shines is with its instantaneous translation possibilities that remove the sometimes awkward waiting game. Read more

follow @the-future-now

things i learnt regarding learning languages

recently i finished second stage of linguistic olympiad, which focuses on translating rare languages based on logical analysis, basically you don’t know the language but there is a logic rule you have to guess to translate things, yeah, its fun, now im waiting for the results of the second stage.

the thing is, after practicing, doing many problems from previous years, i found myself understanding languages’ rules easier. i’ve always been convinced that to learn language is not to learn the rules by heart, but to understand them, so here are my tips based on that:

1. native speakers are your best resource. some may disagree due to them often not being aware of certain grammar rules, but thats the point. learn the usage, not the rules. rules will come naturally to you when you analyse them for yourself based on using the language. 

2. ive been learning russian for almost 2 years now and my teacher has been focusing on remembering the rules, as if thats the best way to learn the language. so we didnt have much access to any context, not to mention poorly made textbooks. but now that ive become familiar with lots of usage, i dont need to stress about the rules, but base the grammar on previous, similiar contexts.

3. you dont need the rules unless youre majoring philology. for real, i understand that its not your native language, but whats so bad about treating it as one? learn it just like kids would. use it.

4. about using it, put yourself in native speaker’s position, change the language of your fav sites, talk to people even if you dont know much yet, stop stressing about grammar. imagine people talking to you without using cases, conjugations - youre still gonna understand them, so why not start with that yourself?

summary:

- analyse the grammar yourself instead of learning written rules (thats also gonna make you remember it better)

- vocabulary > grammar

- make friends with native speakers

- embarass yourself, make mistakes, talk bullshit - its all a way to success

How to Annotate Literature

Many times language and literature classes require students to annotate the books that are given to them, but in many cases tips and advice on how to do so is lacking. I will be sharing my personal strategy for efficient and successful annotating that will not only help your understanding of the text but also gain the love of your teachers!

The tips have been divided into 5 components, each with their own explanation.

Sticky Tabs are Your Best Friend

I don’t know how I would manage to annotate without my sticky tabs. They help me organize and navigate the book before the reading, remind me what to look for while i’m going through the text and help me find whatever I may need once I get to further analysis for the class. 

Create a key for your tabs, personally I use five colors each having a few specific purposes based on where I place them in the book. Most stickies are accompanied by a specific note that will remind me of what I wanted to point out, these stick out of the right margin. 

  • Pink- Anything to do with characters, be it development or certain traits to remember. It can also be used for when you have questions about character related aspects of the text.
  • Orange- Refers to setting, in plays it is also applicable for stage directions.
  • Yellow- Is used for literary devices and use of language (tone, diction, patterns) and syntax, if there is a particular word the author used or a structure you want to take note of, this is the color to use. 
  • Green- Applicable to any important plot events, notable scenes or things that you think will be significant later in the story.
  • Blue- Themes and context of said ideas, anything to do with time, place and space in which the text takes place. It can also relate to how your context (a student reading a book for a literature course) impacts your perception of the text.

These are the things teachers usually look out for and it is certainly useful in any kind of further task! 

The top and bottom margins can be used to divide the book in to sections, such as chapters or scenes, mark the most important pages and to also highlight text to text connections. These colors you can pick yourself!

I do not recommend having more than 5 sticky tabs per page, otherwise it gets too crowded and they lose their purpose! (but you will still need to buy aaa lloootttt)

This is my key for the book I am currently annotating, Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. 

Don’t Overdo it With the Highlighter

Find one color highlighter that you like the most and use it to mark explicit words or phrases that catch your attention, you can also use them in correlation with you sticky tabs! 

I prefer to use a yellow highlighter because it seems to bleed the least, and I usually use it in relation to the the yellow and blue tabs because those are the ones that relate to the most detailed and minute parts of the text. Once again you can find your own preference! But don’t overdo it, otherwise, like the tabs, the highlighter will lose its function to highlight important points. 

This is an example of how much highlighting I usually do. For non-fictional texts or parts of a book (like in the introduction you see here) I reserved highlighter for dates and names. 

Have a Conversation With the Author

This is one of the first tips that my high school teacher gave me and it’s really one of the most important ones to remember. And I know, it may sound kinda silly, but I find that it really helps me in developing my ideas and remembering exactly how I felt about a certain aspect of part of the text. 

Whether the text is fiction of non fiction, anything in between, you can always do these few things

  • Ask questions- As if you were going to get an answer, ask questions, write them down and write down as many as you want. Writing things down helps people remember so then it is more likely that in a class discussion you will be able to recall your queries or wonders. 
  • If you don’t like something, or you’re surprised by something, write it down! Use exclamation marks, use words that you would use in a regular conversation. I always write ‘WOW!!’ or ‘OMG’ when i’m especially impressed, and having such vocal- well written vocally- emotions will bring you closer to the subject of the text. 
  • Talk to the characters as well, if you are questioning a character’s actions ask them and provide an explanation as to why you speculate they may have acted a certain way. Not only does that further contribute to your involvement (also making things more entertaining) but it also deepens your thought!

What i’m trying to say is write down anything that comes to mind, your first response is your true response, and it is a valuable addition to your notes! And if you want to write a whole essay in between the lines… Actually, i’ll come back to that later! 

Pens, not Pencils 

I used to make notes completely in pencil but my approach changed when I realized that overtime the pencil would rub off and get illegible. I think it was because I used my book so much, but having switched to pen I realized that it helps me in quite a few other things as well. 

The good thing about pen is that you can’t erase it and let’s say you started writing down a note, scan down the page and realize what you are taking a note of is completely wrong. That’s ok! That’s actually really good! Don’t scribble out what you just wrote down, but instead continue and explain why you may have thought a certain way and what your understanding is now. That relates really closely to the previous note. 

Evidently pen also appears darker on the page, then there’s no possibility of it ever disappearing. It also won’t smudge or bleed as long as it’s ballpoint! That’s a good thing when drawing arrows between lines, underlining in addition to your highlights and circling/boxing whatever you deem necessary.

Time, Effort and Commitment

It’s clear that this post took me a while to make, and it took me a while to develop this system with all of the things that I have considered. So it must be self evident that using this type of annotation won’t be quick. It might get tiring at some times, and for me it really does, but at the end I find that it always pays off! You have to stay committed to this technique, you have to put in the same amount of effort for every page, which means you need time. So here are a few final general tips I will leave you with.

  • Don’t procrastinate! As goes for any task, and this one more than any, don’t waste time getting to it! I advice you check how many pages you have in total and make sure that you do a certain amount per day (usually 5-10 pages a day is good!)
  • If you go off on massive tangents in the side bars, make sure that you don’t get too distracted by them because they will take up a lot of your time. But one now and then may be good! Be sure to mark it for later reference!
  • Play mind games with yourself. This one is actually pretty interesting but it personally gets me a long way. If you have 20 pages left, don’t look at it as 20 pages but instead as 4 times 5, then the amount will seem a lot more manageable! It’s a kind of self encouragement!
  • That can also be said by looking now and then at how far your bookmark has moved through the book and giving yourself a pat on the back for all of you hard work!

That’s all I have for now! If you have any further questions for advice or explanation please message me and I will be more than happy to help! And I hope that this helps some people out too! (I’m counting this as 21/100 days of productivity as all I did today was related to annotating.)