100+ Followers Landmark

I’ve been putting this off long enough, I think. : P I’m actually at 130+ at this point, lol.

Anyway, it’s time to celebrate with another contest! Another chance to have a photoshoot, to be exact. I did this during my 25+ landmark, and this is how it goes:

If you win this contest, I’ll do a photoshoot of your wizard anywhere you want in the spiral, provided I have access to the areas. I have everything unlocked up to the end of Avalon and a tiny bit of Azteca right now, including Grizzleheim, Wintertusk, and Wysteria.

The photos taken will be edited, and will include a background, an icon, and some various shots of you in your chosen area(s).

I will choose the winners with a random number generator. Your reblog or like will be given a number, and if the generator picks that number, you win.

How to enter:

  • Reblog this post and/or like this post

Rules:

  • You must be following me. This is for my followers.
  • No creating another account to get more chances to win.
  • One reblog = one slot in a random number generator
  • One like = one slot in a random number generator
  • You can reblog more than once, but don’t spam your followers too much, please.
  • For this contest, since it is for 100+ followers, I will be choosing ten winners!!

Thank you all so much for the follows, likes, and reblogs!! I really do appreciate it. : ) Good luck!!

4

BEYOND THE BONDS OF DEATH: FOUR PLACES TO FIND HOUDINI’S LEGEND STILL LIVING IN NYC

BY ALLISON MEIER / 25 FEB 2014 Harry Houdini arrived in New York City in 1886, an anonymous Budapest-born newcomer in the frenetic cityscape. By the time he died in 1926, however, he was the city’s most thrilling performer, and the shadow of the great escape artist still remains. It was while performing in Coney Island that he met his future wife Bess, in Flatbush where he recorded his voice on wax cylinders with Thomas Edison, and in 1917 he performed his straightjacket escape above a Times Square crowd while hanging upside down from a crane being employed to work on the subway. In the East River he survived his first crate escape, tossed in the currents between Manhattan and Brooklyn, and in 1926 he escaped from a coffin at the bottom of a pool in the Shelton Hotel on Lexington (now a Marriott Hotel). In 1918, he even made an elephant vanish at the New York Hippodrome. Discover the Four places his legend can still be found…at atlas obscura