landing in the us

2

“We will have it all back someday, sweet sister,” he would promise her. Sometimes his hands shook when he talked about it. “The jewels and the silks, Dragonstone and King’s Landing, the Iron Throne and the Seven Kingdoms, all they have taken from us, we will have it back.” Viserys lived for that day. All that Daenerys wanted back was the big house with the red door, the lemon tree outside her window, the childhood she had never known.

I didn’t want to ruin this post by @pastel-sirius so we are going to talk about this in a separate post. Also I love that post. Anyways…


So Sirius would reply to how he got out bay saying that a dog can easily fit between those bars but that dog used to be able to wrestle a wolf, it used to be the big black dog and the real and whole Padfoot wouldn’t have fit through those bars. Twelve years, twelve torturous years reliving your worst memories, how your best friend was killed, how you were betrayed, how you lost the man you loved, how your brother died again and again and again. You would lose whatever appetite you have. I’m sure Sirius was able to fit through those bars because he was nothing more than mere bones which makes me think… how did he find the courage to jump into the ice cold water to find land? He was not strong, he probably hadn’t used his muscles the way he used it that night for years. Any logical person would have been afraid but Sirius is impulsive when the people he care for are concerned so the answer is not that far away: Harry. The loyalty and the love he was feeling towards Harry made him escape from Azkaban and I feel like the fact that he knew he was innocent kept him alive. 

I have so many feelings about Sirius is Azkaban like if I had the time this post would have been 800 words long.

PCG: YOU SAID WHAT SHE ASKED WAS IMPOSSIBLE.
?GG: it might be
FGA: What Were Her Demands
?GG: she said
?GG: that if i accepted her help
?GG: that i would have to make a promise
?GG: that whenever we left this place
?GG: and wherever we end up going
?GG: she had to come
PCG: HUH?
?GG: not just echidna but all the denizens
?GG: their palaces their consorts their lands…
?GG: everything
?GG: i have to bring them all with us 

Hmm… tricky, yes. Impossible? Hard to say. At the very least, I will concede that there is no clear way to do it at present.

I realize this is not new information to anyone, but what struck me so hard this time I read the Lord of the Rings was the sense of melancholy.  Like it’s painfully obvious to the reader that this world is Not As It Once Was.  All of the characters we meet reference this feeling of loss in one way or another.  

The elves are the most obvious - with their fading light and their ships sailing away.  Treebeard talks about how the woods aren’t as they once were, about the ents who are falling asleep and withering to nothing.  The dwarves lust after the glory of their forefathers, be it in mountain fortresses or caverns of mithril - now empty and echoing.  Old Tom Bombadil remembers a race of great men and women, reduced simply to trinkets in cold tombs.

And even men, the race set to inherit this new age, even they are experiencing this sense of melancholy, of losing hold of something great.  We see their great cities reduced to rubble on riverbanks, or possessed by evil.  Aragorn longs to return to his throne to restore the glory of ages past, to somehow rejuvenate that which is dying in the race of men. 

And hobbits?  At first we see them as living in the present, with no great glory of the past to tie them down.  Yet when Frodo returns to the Shire, it is…Not As It Once Was.  And I think while the other hobbits are able to shake off this feeling and return to their love of life and the present, maybe Frodo’s true burden is to inherit this sense of loss from the rest of Middle Earth.  

I don’t think I’ve seen any posts that went over what the water system in Palestine was like for each house, so I’ll try to go over it as best I can without any pictures -

Israel controls all of our water resources, and has allocated the resources of the Jordan river in an 83%/17% split, meaning that Israelis get 83% of its water while Palestinians are only allowed the remaining 17%.

Israel also routinely shuts of Palestinian water in order to supply Israeli settlements, which feature lavish swimming pools and well-kept community gardens - something we as Palestinians cannot have due to our limited water allowance and uncertainty regarding water availability.

What this leads to is a situation in which farmers cannot expand their crops or grow their gardens, because to do so would require time, money, and most of all, water. Because water is only allocated to us in an infrequent basis, how is a farmer to know that he has the water security required in order to expand his crops without worrying about having his water shut off for two weeks as all his crops die?

Each house in Palestine generally contains either a beir [well], large plastic containers, or both, meant to hold water. These are automatically filled when Israel turns on our water, with the house itself using the Israeli water before tapping into the beir or the other water reserves.

Motors in the house pump the water into the wells when Israel turns the water on, and then another motor pumps the water of the well into the house.

What makes things even worse is that if there’s no electricity and your well is empty, then it’s not going to fill with water, and if the well is full and there’s no Israeli water or electricity, then the water is not going to make it from the well to your house.

Aside from cutting off our water and only supplying it to us on set days, Israel also frequently cuts out electricity, especially on the hottest days of the year when Israeli settlers are blasting their ACs and creating a huge spike in electricity demand. 

This is just one small aspect of life under Israeli occupation that I feel many don’t actually realize or consider. 

When we say that Israel controls every aspect of our lives, we mean it in the absolute most literal sense. We can’t shower unless they turn on our water, we can’t plant our crops unless they turn on our water, we can’t visit neighboring cities unless the soldiers at the checkpoint are feeling generous, we can’t pray at our holy sites in Jerusalem without special permits that they rarely hand out, We can’t build up our own infrastructure without them tearing it down and claiming it’s a “security concern”. We can’t build on our OWN land without getting approval from them first. We can’t use mobile data services because they continue to deny us the equipment and mobile spectrum required for it, so while Israelis and Israeli settlers enjoy all the 4G they want on their phones, Palestinians are still stuck with having text and the OCCASIONAL “Edge” signal on ours. 

And the list goes on, and on, and on.

My heart was broken. It’s always going to be broken. And I know yours is broken too.
—  Manchester By The Sea
4

– Guess this is our only way out.

– After you, then.

Lupin III: Jigen’s Gravestone | dr. Takeshi Koike