lafayette galleries

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Half and half Lafayette and Jefferson Poster Print by Jade Catunao

Only $5!!


https://www.etsy.com/listing/516992544/lafayette-and-jefferson-poster-print?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=handmade&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=lafayette&ref=sr_gallery_6

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Mathieu Matégot was born in Hungary in 1910. After his studies at the school of fine arts and architecture in Budapest, he began to create sets for the National Theater. He settled in France in 1931, where he took up various professions, creating sets for the Folies Bergères, window dresser for the Lafayette Galleries, fashion desingner for dressmaking firms in Paris At the end of the 1930’s, painting that he had continued doing, led him to a new world: tapestry work. The second world war interrupted his activity. A volunteer in french army, he was taken prisoner and he was free in 1944. After his return, he set up a workshop for handcrafted furniture in Paris. He used materials such as metal, rattan, glass, Formica, and perforated sheet metal in particular, to design chairs, armchairs, tables, serving tables, sideboards, desks and useful articles. His activity as designer spanned a relativity short period, up to the beginning of the 1960’s. During this period, he created the three-legged chair “nagasaki” (1954) and the “copacabana” armchair (1955/1956) that are today part of the design collection at the Museum of Decoratives Arts in Paris and the design collection at the Georges Pompidou Centre, National Museum of Modern Art, Industrial centre, Beaubourg, Paris. These two pieces made in steel tube and perforated sheet metal, materials that were first used by Mathieu Matégot, are particulary representative of his work. During this decade, he also designed several decoration sites at Paris and overseas: Hotel de France at Conakry, Drugstrore Publicis, Paris, Maison de l'ORTF, Paris 1962. The Matégot’s stand is present at all great events like “Salon des Artistes Décorateurs, SAD, Paris, or "Salon des Arts Ménagers”, Paris. He was with Prouvé, Perriand, Royère, Adnet and the ceramist Georges Jouve in development of various projects, one of the most renowned french designer of this time. In early 60’s, he deliberately stopped this activity to devote himself to tapestry work

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Lay - 160414 Zhang Yixing Studio’s weibo update: “#张艺兴弹恋爱##张艺兴代言薇姿# 能够打动我老板的15种强韧特质:乐观、热情、真诚、勇敢、专注、活力、积极、阳光、时尚、自信、拼搏、强韧、好奇心、坚持、谦逊 你get到了吗?@薇姿 @老佛爷百货中国”

Translation: “#Date Zhang Yixing# #Zhang Yixing as the ambassador for Vichy# 15 strong characteristics that will touch my boss: optimism, enthusiasm, sincerity, bravery, being focused, being energetic, positivity, brightness, being fashionable, confidence, being hard-working, strength, curiosity, perseverance, modestty Do you get it? @Vichy @Galleries LaFayette”

Credit: 张艺兴工作室.

georgiefinchs  asked:

hii!! i'm going to paris in a few days and i'm short in ideas of new places to go, to visit, could you share your favourite things to do there, please? :)

Hi! Paris is one of my favorite places, so narrowing down a list of favorites could prove slightly tricky, but I’ll try to keep it under 10 items! Each place has a link to its location on Google Maps. 

1) The Louvre. I am a firm believer that everyone should experience the Louvre at least once in their life. Obviously there’s the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo to see, but did you know that you can tour the Imperial State Apartments of Emperor Napoléon III and Empress Eugenie? In the collection of 17th-18th century paintings there are a few paintings of Henri IV, my favorite King in history and a rather cheeky painting of two of his mistresses. To avoid the crowds I would recommend getting off the metro at Palais-Royale-Musée du Louvre, where you can enter through the Carousel du Louvre (which is a great spot for free WiFi.) For the obligatory Pyramid photo you can leave at ground level. I would also try to go a couple of hours before closing when most people have had their fill of art and moved onto something else! I wouldn’t ever recommend spending more than a couple of hours here though, it can all get a bit overwhelming! 

2) Le Musée de l’Orangerie. This is where Monet’s beautiful waterlilies are. It’s a haven of tranquility at the other end of the Tuilleries from the Louvre. The only let in a certain number of people at a time so it’s never packed like the other museums can get. Take your time, sitting at observing the Waterlilies before heading downstairs to look at the rest of the pieces.

3) Sainte-Chapelle. I’ve seen my share of churches and chapels, thanks mum (!) and this is one of the best. It’s one of Paris’ oldest surviving structures. The glasswork is absolutely breathtaking. There are no words to describe it. It sits within government buildings, I think the Palais de Justice, so your bag absolutely will be searched and you will most likely have to go through a metal detector and may be frisked after passing gendarmes. Bring an official form of id, preferably your passport. I haven’t visited since before the Charlie Hebdo attacks so security measures may have increased from this. Don’t let anything put you off, a brisk pat down from a surly Frenchman quickly fades to blurred memory when you walk into the upper level of the former Royal chapel.

4) City-Pharma. Moving from culture to shopping, no trip to Paris would be complete for me without a visit to the Mothership. It’s basically a stack em high, sell em cheap pharmacy. I always stock up on thing I can’t get outside of France, or that cost twice as much anywhere else. 6€ Bioderma? Yes, please! Sharpen your elbows and prepare to push a little to get to the shelves. For the first timer, I would recommend anything from Embryolisse, Nuxe and Bioderma. 

5) Printemps. Most department stores leave me felling panicky and I want to leave after 2 minutes, looking at you Debenhams. Printemps doesn’t. To avoid the tourists, but also experience all the affordable luxury items, i.e. cosmetics, in one place head to Printemps. You may even get ever so slightly better customer service then in Galleries Lafayette as the staff aren’t dealing with 4 different tourists at once. I also get the impression that like Brits will head to Harvey Nichols and Liberty rather that Harrods Parisians will head here rather than Galleries Lafayette, feel free to correct me on this though! 

6) Passage Joffroy. There are loads these arcades around the city, but this is by far my favorite. They’re especially good for window shopping as there are always adorable antique and book shops. There are usually quite a few tourists, there’s a waxwork museum next door, but it’s still the most charming one I’ve come across. 

7) Librarie Galignani. Heaven on earth. The first English Language bookshop in Paris. The walls are packed with books by everyone from Simone de Beauvoir to Zadie Smith. I am forever tempted to buy the beautiful but whole unnecessary to my collection hardback set of the Harry Potter books in translation! Take your time browsing the stacks before picking up a new read that you’ll forever remember buying opposite the Tuileries in Paris. Once you’ve bought your book head next door to…

8) Angelina. L’Africain is the best hot chocolate in the world. It’s an undisputed fact. What isn’t s great, however, is the quest to get in or the hoards of tourists all intent on getting at the chocolate/macaron sugar rush inside. Instead, go to the side and get a half size (and half price) take away cup of hot chocolate and sit in the Tuilleries with your book. None can drink a full cup without feeling nauseated anyway. I’ve also heard great things about the gelato. 

9) The Opéra Garnier. Without a doubt, this is one of the most beautiful buildings in Paris, I’ve only ever been into the lobby, but I’ve heard that you can do a tour with a member of staff and if you’re lucky, score some cheap tickets to that evenings performance. 

10) Falafel from Chez Marianne and a bottle of wine by the Seine. This is probably the most cliché activity on the list, but I don’t care. I rarely sit in an actual restaurant when I’m in Pairs. My visits are always too short to spend time sat inside. Instead, I go to the little windows on falafel restaurants and crêperies (La Drougerie is a new favourite, thanks to a recommendation from innogensimaginarium) and get food to take away. Bottle of 6€ wine from the supermarket and supper in hand, wander down to the banks of the Seine and sit on the banks watching the sunset and waving at the passengers on the bateaux-mouches. It’s a wonderful way to pass a Spring or Summer evening. 

11) Flea markets. Wander around looking at all of the gems, challenge your group to find the most exquisite/crazy/wild item under a set budget or just decorate your fantasy home. There tends to be a different market every day so check google on the day so you aren’t disappointed when you get to a location and find there isn’t a market!  

This New York Times piece and this Buzzfeed article are also really good if you’re still stuck for ideas. I could probably list another 50 places and things to do, but I think 11 is probably enough to be going on for now! 

I hope you have a magical time in Paris, don’t forget to take loads of photos!

xo