lady elizabeth bowes lyon

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26 April 1923 - Wedding of Prince Albert, Duke of York and Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon 

Dearest Bertie,
You are indeed a lucky man to have such a charming and delightful wife as Elizabeth & I am sure you will both be very happy together & I trust you both will have many, many years of happiness before you, & that you will be as happy as Mama and I are, after you have been married 30 years, I can’t wish you more…
I am certain that Elizabeth will be a splendid partner in your work, & share with you & help you in all you have to do.
Wishing you & Elizzbeth every good luck & a very happy honeymoon.
Ever my dear boy
Your most devoted Papa

King George V to his son Prince Albert

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Queen Elizabeth II Alphabet

C is for Royal Christenings 

The best friend and cousin of the Queen, Margaret Rhodes has died aged 91, Buckingham Palace confirmed today.

Mrs Rhodes passed away on Friday night following a short illness. It is believed that the Queen had visited her regularly over the past few weeks.

Buckingham Palace has said it will not be issuing a statement because it is a private matter, although the Queen has sent her condolences to the family.

An insider told the Sunday Express: “The Queen will be devastated to have lost her best friend. She grew up with Mrs Rhodes and they had so much shared history. They remained close throughout the Queen’s reign and Her Majesty continued to be a regular visitor at Mrs Rhodes’s Windsor home until very recently.”

“One of the disadvantages of the Queen having such a long life is that she has had to say goodbye to so many dear friends and relatives.”

“It is such a sad loss for Her Majesty, Mrs Rhodes’s family and everyone in the royal household. She was an extraordinary woman.”

Born Margaret Elphinstone, Mrs Rhodes was the youngest daughter of Sidney Elphinstone, the 16th Lord Elphinstone and his wife Lady Mary Bowes-Lyon - sister to the late Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother.

The Queen and Mrs Rhodes have been close friends since childhood and were only 10 months apart in age. They spent regular holidays together growing up and during the Second World War Mrs Rhodes lived alongside the Royal Family at Buckingham Palace and Windsor Castle, when she studied at secretarial school and then worked as a secretary for MI6.

In 1947 Mrs Rhodes was one of eight bridesmaids at the future Queen’s wedding to Lt Philip Mountbatten, now the Duke of Edinburgh.

She married the writer Denys Gravenor Rhodes in 1950, with Princess Margaret as one of the bridesmaids. The couple brought up two sons and two daughters in Devon.

When Mr Rhodes was diagnosed with cancer, the Queen offered the couple the Garden House in Windsor Great Park so they could be closer to London for treatment. Mr Rhodes died in 1981 and his widow remained there.

The cousins remained so close that they would take tea together every Sunday after church when the Queen was in Windsor.

In 1991, Mrs Rhodes became Woman of the Bedchamber, a mixture of lady-in-waiting and companion, to her aunt, the Queen Mother, until her death in 2002. That year the Queen appointed Mrs Rhodes Lieutenant of the Royal Victorian Order (LVO).

In her 2011 autobiography, The Final Curtsey, she described how as teenagers she and her royal cousins slipped out of Buckingham Palace on May 8, 1945, and celebrated VE Day with the crowds in The Mall, inspiring the 2015 film A Royal Night Out.

She also revealed how the future Queen did the conga through the palace and sang until 2am on VJ Day.

Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother (4 August 1900 - 30 March 2002) 
b. Lady Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon. 

“Wouldn’t it be terrible if you’d spent all your life doing everything you were supposed to do, didn’t drink, didn’t smoke, didn’t eat things, took lots of exercise, and suddenly, one day, you were run over by a big red bus and, as the wheels were crunching into you, you’d say, ‘Oh my God, I could have got so drunk last night.’ That’s the way you should live your life, as if tomorrow you’ll be run over by a big red bus.”

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”[..] but I feel I must tell you that I have always cared for you & had the hope that you would one day care for me. Things were difficult for both of us weren’t they from the start, & I understand from your letter that you want me to forget it. I have no other alternative I am afraid so I will try.” Duke of York to Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, letter dated 16 March 1922

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Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, 1919.

In the summer of 1918 Elizabeth emerged in society. She attended a ball given by the Countess of Powis at 45 Berkeley Square for her daughter Hermione, a direct contemporary. “I remember dancing with a nice young American… she wrote later, “and the amazement and thrill when the next day a huge bunch of red roses arrived! In those days flowers were very rare!” At the time when young girls were excited by lunches at the Ritz, and young men coming to tea, she added: “one was thrilled by that sort of things.”  | Hugo Vickers.

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Get To Know Me Meme [Royalist Edition]

[2/15] Royals in General

Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother

Elizabeth Angela Marguerite Bowes-Lyon (4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002) was the wife of King George VI and the mother of Queen Elizabeth II and Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon. She was Queen consort of the United Kingdom from her husband’s accession in 1936 until his death in 1952, after which she was known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, to avoid confusion with her daughter. She was the last Empress of India.

Born into a family of British nobility as The Honourable Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, she became Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon when her father inherited the Scottish Earldom of Strathmore and Kinghorne in 1904. She came to prominence in 1923 when she married Albert, Duke of York, the second son of King George V and Queen Mary. The couple and their daughters embodied traditional ideas of family and public service. She undertook a variety of public engagements and became known as the “Smiling Duchess” because of her consistent public expression.

In 1936, her husband unexpectedly became King when his brother, Edward VIII, abdicated in order to marry the American divorcée Wallis Simpson. As Queen, Elizabeth accompanied her husband on diplomatic tours to France and North America before the start of World War II. During the war, her seemingly indomitable spirit provided moral support to the British public. In recognition of her role as an asset to British interests, Adolf Hitler described her as “the most dangerous woman in Europe”. After the war, her husband’s health deteriorated and she was widowed at the age of 51.

On the death of her mother-in-law, Queen Mary, in 1953 and with the former King Edward VIII living abroad and her elder daughter, the new Queen, aged 27, Elizabeth became the senior member of the British Royal Family and assumed a position as family matriarch. In her later years, she was a consistently popular member of the family, even when other members were suffering from low levels of public approval. She continued an active public life until just a few months before her death at the age of 101, seven weeks after the death of her younger daughter, Princess Margaret. (x)