lady creator profile

4

ProFile Friday

Florence “Flo” Steinberg  (born March 17) is an American publisher of one of the first independent comic books, the underground/alternative comics hybrid Big Apple Comix, in 1975. Additionally, as the secretary for Marvel Comics editor Stan Lee and the fledgling company’s receptionist and fan liaison during the 1960s Silver Age of Comic Books, she was a key participant of and witness to Marvel’s expansion from a two-person staff to a pop culture conglomerate. As of 2007, Steinberg, who has appeared in fictionalized form in Marvel Comics, speaks at comic book conventions and has been the subject of a magazine profile.

The daughter of a taxi-driver father and a public-stenographer mother, Flo Steinberg was raised in the Dorchester and Mattapan neighborhoods of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. There she attended Roxbury Memorial High School for Girls, serving a term as president of the student council. Steinberg majored in History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she rushed Sigma Delta Tau sorority and received her B.A. in 1960. Afterward, while working as a service representative for the New England Telephone Company in Boston, she was a volunteer on Ted Kennedy’s first U.S. Senatorial campaign. After moving to New York City in 1963, Steinberg additionally worked “in a minor way” for Robert F. Kennedy’s Senate bid.

In the career-girl fashion of that era, Steinberg spent some months living at a YWCA and job-hunting through employment agencies. “After a couple of interviews, I was sent to this publishing company called Magazine Management. There I met a fellow by the name of Stan Lee, who was looking for what they called then a ‘gal Friday’…. Stan had a one-man office on a huge floor of other offices, which housed the many parts of the magazine division…. Magazine Management published Marvel Comics as well as a lot of men’s magazines, movie magazines, crossword puzzle books, romance magazines, confession magazines, detective magazines…. Each department took turns, one day a week, covering the switchboard…when the regular operator took her lunch break”.

Marvel’s only staffers at that time were Lee and Steinberg herself, with the rest of the work handled freelance. De facto production manager Sol Brodsky “would come in and set up an extra little drawing board where he would do the paste-ups and mechanicals for the ads”. She recalled that the “first real Bullpen” — the roomful of artists at drawing boards making corrections, preparing art for printing, and, as envisioned later within Marvel’s letter pages and “Bullpen Bulletins”, a mythologized clubhouse in which the likes of Lee, Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Don Heck and others would be found kibitzing — was created when Marvel moved downtown a few buildings from 655 Madison Avenue to 635 Madison Avenue. Among the first Bullpen staffers, Steinberg recalled, were Marie Severin and Morrie Kuramoto, followed by John Verpoorten and Herb Trimpe.

Artist Jim Mooney once recalled,

She was wonderful! You’d go to DC and it was a business-like thing and I’d come out of there and I’d feel, 'Oh, God, I need a drink’. [laughter] I’d go to Marvel and I’d come in and Flo would say, 'Hello, Jim! Oh, I’ll call Stan right away! Stan!!! Jim Mooney is here!!!’ And I’d think, 'Oh my God, who am I? I’m a celebrity’. [laughter] She was great. It wasn’t just me, believe me, it was everybody and anybody, but I still felt, well, it was really just me.

The all-purpose Steinberg — given the sobriquet “Fabulous Flo”, in the manner of many other Marvel Comics endearments — said that she

…became so overwhelmed with the fan mail and the Merry Marvel Marching Society fan club that Stan started. There was just so much work! I need extra help and had gotten this wonderful letter from a college girl in Virginia by the name of Linda Fite. She came up and was hired to help me out, though she eventually went on to do writing and production work.

Steinberg became exposed to the underground comix scene after meeting and becoming friends with Trina Robbins, who had come to the Marvel offices to interview Lee for the Los Angeles Free Press alternative newspaper. Through her, Steinberg became acquainted with contributors to the New York City alternative paper the East Village Other, and met such underground cartoonists as Kim Deitch, Art Spiegelman, and Spain Rodriguez. Journalist Robin Green, who succeeded Steinberg at Marvel in 1968, wrote in Rolling Stone:

It was three years ago that I went to work at Marvel Comics. I replaced Flo, whose place I really couldn’t take. Fabulous Flo Steinberg, as she was known to her public, was as much an institution in Marvel’s Second Golden Age as Editor Stan (The Man) Lee himself. She joined Marvel just after Stan had revolutionized the comic industry by giving his characters dimension, character, and personality, and just as Marvel was catching on big.

Steinberg left Marvel in 1968. The position itself, even after five years, was not particularly well-paid, and Steinberg quit after not receiving a $5 raise. Marie Severin, recalling the day of Steinberg’s going-away party, observed in 2002: “I think the stupidest thing Marvel ever did was not give her a raise when she asked for it because she would have been such an asset to have around later because she’s so honest and decisive. … I was thinking, 'What the hell is the problem with these people? She’s a personality. She knows what she’s doing. She handles the fans right. She’s loyal to the company. Why the hell won’t they give her a decent raise? Dummies.’”

Steinberg went to work for the American Petroleum Industry, leaving when that trade group relocated to Washington, D.C. She moved to San Francisco, California, in the early 1970s, and later to Oregon before returning to New York City to help run Captain Company, the mail-order division of the horror-comics magazine firm, Warren Publishing.

She spoke at a 1974 New York Comic Art Convention panel on the role of women in comics, alongside Marie Severin, Jean Thomas (sometime-collaborator of then-husband Roy Thomas) and fan representative Irene Vartanoff. In 1975, Steinberg published Big Apple Comix, a seminal link between underground comix and modern-day independent comics, with contributors including such mainstream talents as Neal Adams, Archie Goodwin, Denny O'Neil, Al Williamson, and Wally Wood. Critic Ken Jones, in a 1986 retrospective review, suggested that Big Apple Comix and [Mark Evanier’s] High Adventure may have been “the first true alternative comics”.

In the 1990s, Steinberg returned to work for Marvel as a proofreader, succeeding Jack Abel.

She continues to have a strong legacy in the Marvel mythos. A fictionalized Steinberg starred alongside Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Sol Brodsky — all transformed into a Marvel Bullpen version of the Fantastic Four — in the alternate-reality comic What If #11 (Oct. 1978). Written and drawn by Kirby, the odd tale featured Steinberg as the character then called the Invisible Girl. In alternate universe series Ultimate Fantastic Four #28 (May 2006), writer Mark Millar added a brief tribute to Steinberg. She serves as the secretary to President Thor on an Earth populated almost entirely by superheroes. She warns the Human Torch not to burn the rug, to which he replies, “I know, I know. No need to be such a nag, Miss Steinberg”.

5

ProFile Friday

Liz Berube, (born January 7, 1943) also known as Elizabeth Safian, was a romance comics artist for DC Comics in the 1970s. She illustrated fashion features, horoscope pages, tables of contents and other various ornamental pieces. She was also a prolific colorist for DC and Archie comics.

Berube was born in Brooklyn, NY and attended Martin Van Buren High School in Queens where she started a comic strip for the school newspaper, which has been continued by different students to this day. She then went on to study cartooning at the School of Visual Arts. After leaving SVA, she became a colorist and assistant editor for Archie Comics. In the early 1960s, she met DC editor Jack Adler, who brought her into the publisher.

In the late 1960s, her newspaper strip Karen was carried by Newsday Syndicate in 40 newspapers at its peak. She has called Karen “my alter ego.”

In 1970, she began working on DC’s romance comics line, bringing more modern, stylized art to the genre, which was still being drawn in the realistic style that had become parodied in Pop Art. She worked on such titles as “Date with Debbi”, “Falling in Love”, “Girls’ Love Stories”, “Girls’ Romances”, “Heart Throbs”, “Secret Hearts”, “Young Love”, and “Young Romance”. She was offered the position of editor of the whole line, but as a 24-year-old single mother, she preferred the flexibility of working from home that pencilling and coloring allowed and declined. The line folded a few years later in 1973.

She worked as a colorist for Neal Adams’s Continuity Graphics from 1985 to 1989. Throughout her career she has worked on children’s books, cards, and other commissioned work.

Berube currently resides in Scottsdale, Arizona.

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ProFile Friday

Emanuela Lupacchino is an Italian artist best known for her work on X-Factor for Marvel.

She was a biotech researcher before deciding to follow her passion for art and comics, and she attended an Italian comics art academy for three years. Her work appeared in the Italian series L'Insonne as well as some short stories in anthologies. She also worked as a character designer for role-playing game books and as an illustrator.

Her first big break into American comics was in 2009, when IDW hired her to pencil Angel: Only Human. In 2010 Marvel hired her to pencil X-Factor with writer Peter David. She has since penciled a Castle tie-in graphic novel (Storm Season) written by Kelly Sue DeConnick, a run on Valiant’s Archer & Armstrong written by Fred Van Lente, and covers on various DC titles such as World’s Finest and Ame-Comi Girls, as well as IDW’s Star Trek.

She cites The Rocketeer creator Dave Stevens as a strong influence on her approach to sequential art.

Find Emanuela’s books on Amazon!

5

#PrideMonth ProFile Friday

Tove Marika Jansson (August 9, 1914 – June 27, 2001) was a Swedish-Finnish novelist, painter, illustrator and comic strip author. She is best known as the author of the Moomin books.

Tove Jansson was born in Helsinki, Finland, which was then a part of the Grand Duchy of Finland. Her family, part of the Swedish-speaking (Swedish: finlandssvensk) minority of Finland, was an artistic one: her father Viktor Jansson was a sculptor and her mother Signe Hammarsten-Jansson was a graphic designer and illustrator. Tove’s siblings also became artists: Per Olov Jansson became a photographer and Lars Jansson an author and cartoonist.

She studied at University College of Arts, Crafts and Design in Stockholm in 1930–33, the Graphic School of the Finnish Academy of Fine Arts in 1933–1937 and finally at L'École d'Adrien Holy and L'École des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1938. She displayed a number of artworks in exhibitions during the 30s and early 40s, and her first solo exhibition was held in 1943.

Jansson wrote and illustrated her first Moomin book, The Moomins and the Great Flood, in 1945, during World War II. She said later that the war had depressed her and she had wanted to write something naïve and innocent. This first book was hardly noticed, but the next Moomin books, Comet in Moominland (1946) and Finn Family Moomintroll (1948), made her famous. She went on to write six more Moomin books, a number of picture books and comic strips. Her fame spread quickly and she became Finland’s most widely read author abroad. In 1966 she was awarded the Hans Christian Andersen Award.

Jansson continued painting and writing for the rest of her life, although her contributions to the Moomin series became rare after 1970. Her first foray outside children’s literature was Bildhuggarens dotter (Sculptor’s Daughter), a semi-autobiographical book written in 1968. After that, she authored five more novels, including Sommarboken(The Summer Book) and five collections of short stories. Although she had a studio in Helsinki, she lived much of her life on a small island called Klovharu, one of the Pellinki Islands near the town of Porvoo. Jansson lived with her female partner, the graphic artist Tuulikki Pietilä.

Jansson is principally known as the author of the Moomin books – stories for children that involve Jansson’s creations, the Moomins. They are a family of trolls who are white, round and furry in appearance, with large snouts that make them vaguely resemble hippopotamuses.

The first Moomin book, The Moomins and the Great Flood, was written in 1945. Although the primary characters are Moominmamma and Moomintroll, most of the principal characters of later stories were only introduced in the next book, so The Moomins and the Great Flood is frequently considered a forerunner to the main series. The book was not a success (and was the last Moomin book to be translated into English), but the next two installments in the Moomin series, Comet in Moominland (1946) and Finn Family Moomintroll (1948), brought Jansson fame. The original title of Finn Family MoomintrollTrollkarlens Hatt, translates as “The Magician’s Hat”.

The style of the Moomin books changed as time went by. The first books, up to Moominland Midwinter (1957), are adventure stories that include floods, comets and supernatural events. The Moomins and the Great Flood deals with Moominmamma and Moomintroll’s flight through a dark and scary forest, where they encounter various dangers. In Comet in Moominland, a comet nearly destroys the Moominvalley (some critics have considered this an allegory of nuclear weapons). Finn Family Moomintroll deals with adventures brought on by the discovery of a magician’s hat. The Exploits of Moominpappa (1950) tells the story of Moominpappa’s adventurous youth and cheerfully parodies the genre of memoirs. Finally, Moominsummer Madness (1955) pokes fun at the world of the theatre: the Moomins explore an empty theatre and perform Moominpappa’s pompous hexametric melodrama.

Moominland Midwinter marks a turning point in the series. The books take on more realistic settings (“realistic” in the context of the Moomin universe) and the characters start to acquire some psychological depth. Moominland Midwinter focuses on Moomintroll, who wakes up in the middle of the winter (Moomins sleep from November to April, as mentioned on the back of the book), and has to cope with the strange and unfriendly world he finds. The short story collection Tales from Moominvalley (1962) and the novels Moominpappa at Sea (1965) andMoominvalley in November (1970) are serious and psychologically searching books, far removed from the light-heartedness and cheerful humor of Finn Family Moomintroll.

After Moominvalley in November Tove Jansson stopped writing about Moomins and started writing for adults. The Summer Book is the best known of her adult fiction translated into English. It is a work of charm, subtlety and simplicity, describing the summer stay on an island of a young girl and her grandmother.

Besides the Moomin novels and short stories, Tove Jansson also wrote and illustrated four original and highly popular picture books: The Book about Moomin, Mymble and Little My (1952), Who will Comfort Toffle? (1960),The Dangerous Journey (1977) and An Unwanted Guest (1980). As the Moomins’ fame grew, two of the original novels, Comet in Moominland and The Exploits of Moominpappa, were revised by Jansson and republished.

Tove Jansson worked as illustrator and cartoonist for the Swedish-language satirical magazine Garm from the 1930s to 1953. One of her political cartoons achieved a brief international fame: she drew Adolf Hitler as a crying baby in diapers, surrounded by Neville Chamberlain and other great European leaders, who tried to calm the baby down by giving it slices of cake – Austria, Poland, Czechoslovakia, etc. Jansson also produced illustrations during this period for the Christmas magazines Julen and Lucifer (just as her mother had earlier) as well as several smaller productions. Her earliest comic strips were produced for productions including Lunkentus (Prickinas och Fabians äventyr, 1929), Vårbrodd (Fotbollen som Flög till Himlen, 1930), and Allas Krönika (Palle och Göran gå till sjöss, 1933).

The figure of the Moomintroll appeared first in Jansson’s political cartoons, where it was used as a signature character near the artist’s name. This “Proto-Moomin,” then called Snork or Niisku, was thin and ugly, with a long, narrow nose and devilish tail. Jansson said that she had designed the Moomins in her youth: after she lost a philosophical quarrel about Immanuel Kant with one of her brothers, she drew “the ugliest creature imaginable” on the wall of their WC and wrote under it “Kant”. This Moomin later gained weight and a more pleasant appearance, but in the first Moomin book The Moomins and the Great Flood (originally Småtrollen och den stora översvämningen), the Immanuel-Kant-Moomin is still perceptible. The name “Moomin” comes from Tove Jansson’s uncle, Einar Hammarsten: when she was studying in Stockholm and living with her Swedish relations, her uncle tried to stop her pilfering food by telling her that a “Moomintroll” lived in the kitchen closet and breathed cold air down people’s necks.

In 1952, after Comet in Moominland and Finn Family Moomintroll had been translated into English, a British publisher asked if Tove Jansson would be interested in drawing comic strips about the Moomins. Jansson had already drawn a long Moomin comic adventure, Mumintrollet och jordens undergång (“Moomintrolls and the End of the World”), based loosely on Comet in Moominland, for the Swedish-language newspaper Ny Tid, and she accepted the offer. The comic strip Moomintroll, started in 1954 in the Evening News, a newspaper for the London area and London commuters (no longer in business). Tove Jansson drew 21 long Moomin stories from 1954 to 1959, writing them at first by herself and then with her brother Lars Jansson. She eventually gave the strip up because the daily work of a comic artist did not leave her time to write books and paint, but Lars took over the strip and continued it until 1975.

The series was published in book form in Swedish, and books 1 to 5 have been published in English, Moomin: The Complete Tove Jansson Comic Strip.

Although she became known first and foremost as an author, Tove Jansson considered her careers as author and painter to be of equal importance. She painted her whole life, changing style from the classical impressionism of her youth to the highly abstract modernist style of her later years. Jansson displayed a number of artworks in exhibitions during the 1930s and early 1940s, and her first solo exhibition was held in 1943. Despite generally positive reviews, criticism induced Jansson to refine her style such that in her 1955 solo exhibition her style had become less overloaded in terms of detail and content. Between 1960 and 1970 Jansson held five more solo exhibitions.

Jansson also created a series of commissioned murals and public works throughout her career, which may still be viewed in their original locations. These works of Jansson’s included:

  • The canteen at the Strömberg factory at Pitäjänmäki, Helsinki (1945)
  • The Aurora Children’s Hospital in Helsinki
  • The Kaupunginkellari restaurant of Helsinki Town Hall
  • The Seurahuone hotel at Hamina
  • The Wise and Foolish Virgins altarpiece in Teuva Church (1954)
  • A number of fairy-tale murals in schools and kindergartens including the kindergarten in Pori (1984)

In addition to providing the illustrations for her own Moomin books, Jansson also illustrated Swedish translations of classics such as J. R. R. Tolkien's The Hobbit and Lewis Carroll's The Hunting of the Snark and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (some used later in Finnish translations as well). She also illustrated her late work,The Summer Book (1972).

In 1966, Jansson won the Hans Christian Andersen Award for her contributions to children’s literature.

Jansson’s Moomin books, originally written in Swedish, have been translated into 33 languages. After the Kalevalaand books by Mika Waltari, they are the most widely translated works of Finnish literature.

The Moomin Museum in Tampere displays much of Jansson’s work on the Moomins. There is also a Moomin theme park named Moomin World in Naantali.

Tove Jansson was selected as the main motif in a recent Finnish commemorative coin, the €10 Tove Jansson and Finnish Children’s Culture commemorative coin, minted in 2004. The obverse depicts a combination of Tove Jansson portrait with several objects: the skyline, an artist’s palette, a crescent and a sailing boat. The reverse design features three Moomin characters.

My Tumblr queue has refused to post this the last two Fridays, so I’m trying it now

ProFile Friday

Jessica Abel (born 1969) is an American comic book writer and artist, known as the creator of such works as Life Sucks, La Perdida and the anthology series Artbabe (from which she published short story collections Mirror, Window and Soundtrack)

Abel was born in 1969 in Chicago, Illinois, and raised in the Chicago metropolitan area. She graduated from Evanston Township High School. She attended Carleton College for in 1987-88, and then transferred to the University of Chicago, where she published her first comics work in 1988, in the student anthology Breakdown. Additionally, she worked for three years in the administration at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Abel started self-publishing the photocopied, hand-sewn and embellished comic book Artbabe in 1992; four annual issues followed, with Abel having won a Xeric Foundation grant to self-publish and distribute issue #5. This was the first professionally printed Artbabe, and was subtitled “The Four Seasons”. With the publication of the Xeric issue of Artbabe, Abel came to the attention of Fantagraphics publisher Gary Groth, who offered to publish the series. Each issue of Artbabe contained one or more complete stories; Abel did not begin any longer sequential work until La Perdida in 2000. The character Artbabe, who appears on every cover, does not actually appear in any of the stories.

In 1998, Abel moved to Mexico City with her boyfriend, now husband, comics artist Matt Madden. She went on hiatus from Artbabe in 1999. From 1996-2005, Abel did a series of one-page journalistic comics for the University of Chicago Magazine, and also embarked on Radio: an Illustrated Guide for the radio program “This American Life”. This book depicted how an episode of the show is made, with behind-the-scenes reportage and a how-to guide to creating a radio show at home.

After two years in Mexico City, Abel moved to Brooklyn, New York. Abel created the five-issue, 250-page series La Perdida. Published by Fantagraphics Books, it concerns a Mexican-American woman, Carla, raised by her Anglo mother, who moves on a whim to Mexico City to search for her identity. It was first published by Fantagraphics Books between 2000 and 2005 as a five-part mini-series. Abel revised the text for its compilation and publication in 2006 as a hardcover volume by Pantheon Books. The book has received a positive critical response.

Abel teaches undergraduate cartooning courses at the School of Visual Arts, and gives workshops at other locations, such as Ox-Bow Summer School of Art. She appeared as a character in the back-cover story of Hate #10 by Peter Bagge. She has stated that her major work is not autobiographical, and that although she is a feminist, her work is not explicitly political.

In 2008, Abel and Madden produced Drawing Words and Writing Pictures for First Second. The book is a product of the years Abel and Madden have spent as teachers, is a comprehensive manual on creating comics. That same year, Abel also collaborated on Life Sucks, written with Gabe Soria and Warren Pleece.

Abel’s one-person exhibitions include “Corridoio Altervox” in Rome, the Phoenix Gallery in Brighton; the Oporto International Comics Festival in Portugal, Viñetas desde o Atlántico in A Coruna, Spain, and the Naples Comicon. Her group exhibitions include the Jean Albano Gallery in Chicago, Athaneum, Stripdagen, in the Netherlands, the Davidson Galleries in Seattle, the Forbes Gallery at the Hyde Park Art Center, in New York, the Regina Miller Gallery and Vox Gallery in Philadelphia, Centre National de la Bande Dessinée et de l'Image in Angoulême, France, and the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts.

In addition to the Xeric Grant, she has also won the Harvey and Lulu Award for Best New Talent (both in 1997), the Harvey Award for Best New Series (for La Perdida) and the Chicago Artists International Program Grant.

ProFile Friday

Madeleine Joan Blaustein (commonly credited as Maddie Blaustein, formerly credited as Addie Blaustein) (born Adam Blaustein October 9, 1960 – December 11, 2008) was a comic book writer and voice actress.

Blaustein was the second oldest of five children and was born in Long Island, New York. She had a twin sister named Gabby, and her brother Jeremy is a Japanese translator for video games and anime. Blaustein was, until her death, the voice of Sartorius in Yu-Gi-Oh! GX. She was also most known as the voices of Meowth in Pokémon (Episodes 29-Season 8) and Solomon Muto (Sugoroku Mutou) from Yu-Gi-Oh! second series anime. She was also Chef Kawasaki from Kirby: Right Back At Ya!, Doctor Kureha in One Piece, and Arngrim, Lawfer, and Lezard in Valkyrie Profile.

She was also a comic book writer and artist, having worked for both Marvel Comics and Milestone Comics, and an animation director. From 1984 to 1991, she served as an Associate Editor in the Spider-Man office. At Marvel, still known as Adam, she and Christopher Priest were close friends. Later, she served as Creative Director for the Weekly World News.

She provided the voice of Margarete in the English version of the PlayStation 2 game Shadow Hearts. Most notable is her great variety of voices. In Valkyrie Profile, for example, she was able to perform a very “tough”, deep masculine voice (Arngrim), as well as a high-class one (Lawfer) and a suitable and somewhat androgynous voice of a mad scientist/sorcerer (Lezard Valeth). In Shadow Hearts, Margarete is voiced in a deep, feminine, and seductive style.  During the 2004 Democratic Party primaries, she appeared as Sméagol on the Mike Malloy Show, announcing a satirical presidential bid. She was also the third English-speaking voice actor for E-123 Omega of the Sonic the Hedgehog series.

Under the pseudonym “Kendra Bancroft”, Blaustein was one of the content creators in the Second Life platform, where she was a very eager participant since 2004, and earned a reputation as an innovative, competent, and very reliable 3-D modeller in the many communities where she participated. Blaustein was male-to-female transgender. Her experience as an activist in the transgendered community helped her to organize and support groups of people in Second Life.

She was a Democratic Socialist who supported Hillary Clinton in the 2008 Presidential election.  Blaustein died on December 11, 2008, in her sleep from a short illness at the age of 48.

ProFile Friday

Mindy Newell (born October 24, 1953) is an American comic book writer and editor. She was the first ongoing female writer for Wonder Woman. A long-time fan of comics, particularly of Marvel’s Spider-Man, she sent submissions to DC Comics in 1983 at a time when the company was actively looking for new talent. Hired by editors Dick Giordano and Karen Berger, Newell wrote fill-in issues for Legion of Super-Heroes and Action Comics.

She was first put on Wonder Woman to wind down the original series in preperation for George Perez’s reboot. However, the editor had a very fixed idea about the story he wanted to tell, and Newell was unable to explore the character in the way she felt it should be done. After one particularly tense confrontation, she yelled and swore at him and quit. She thought her career as a comic book writer was over, but Marv Wolfman caught up with her and convinced her to finish out the run

She later wrote Amethyst: Princess of Gemworld and Catwoman: Her Sister’s Keeper, a seminal limited series. She later returned to Wonder Woman, scripting George Perez’s plots. Newell also briefly worked on First Comics’s American Flagg and Eclipse Comics’s The New Wave.

In 1990 she moved to Marvel Comics as an editor, leaving her day job as a nurse. However, in 1996, Marvel’s financial difficulties led to her being laid off, and she returned to nursing.  Since then, the only comic she has scripted is the series Faces for 2000AD in 2004, co-written with British artist John Higgins.

She has since enrolled in classes at the Gotham Writer’s Workshop, and is working on a young adult novel.

ProFile Friday

Kathryn Immonen (née Kuder) is a Canadian comic book and webcomic writer.

When she finished university, she worked as a costume designer and builder for film and theater.  For 20 years she produced a number of comics with her husband Stuart, including “punk murder mystery” Playground and anthology Headcheese in the ‘80s, Criminal Insects, and webcomics Never as Bad as you Think and Moving Pictures.

In 2007 she began working for Marvel Comics writing a Hellcat story, with Stuart providing the art, for the first four issues of Marvel Comics Presents. This was followed in 2008 by a five issue Patsy Walker: Hellcat mini-series,this time with artist David Lafuente. In May 2009, Immonen became writer for the Marvel Comics’ award-winning series, Runaways with artist Sara Pichelli. Later, she and artist Tonji Zonjic teamed up on the mini-series Heralds, featuring an all-female cast of main characters.  Coming up soon with Marvel is the miniseries Wolverine and Jubilee, and another indie project with Stuart, Russian Olive to Red King.