labor struggles

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2007 - Gifs from an 18-minute documentary on the Ssangyong Motors factory occupation, produced by militant railroad workers from Doro Chiba in Japan.

The Ssangyong strike and factory occupation in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, ended on August 5, 2009, having lasted 77 days. It began when 1700 workers seized the small auto plant on on May 22. Yet 976 workers were able to successfully defend it to the end – against repeated military assaults by riot cops, company-hired goons, and scabs.

The settlement, signed by Ssangyong court receivership management and the Korean Metal Workers’ Union local president, was a negotiated defeat for the workers; the surrender of the factory was followed by felony charges and heavy sentences against occupiers, as well a massive lawsuit against the KMWU.

Despite this, the workers fought valiantly and uncompromisingly for over 2 months, demonstrating a militancy and class consciousness sorely lacking in the world today. The Ssangyong struggle is an inspiration to workers everywhere – especially as the current crisis has been used as a pretext to further attack the working class. It’s about time we turned the class war back on its feet; the Ssangyong struggle offers many lessons for fighting back. [video] / [part 2]

The bourgeois political apparatus wants people to “get out the vote”, is SUPER EXCITED about you voting, because it gives people the illusion that they have the power.

We don’t have the power in this system, though. Power rests in the hands of those who control the economy and the resources: the capitalists. You can’t expect a system that runs on class divisions in the most important aspect of social reproduction to be sufficiently democratic. Our working lives aren’t democratic – our working lives that reproduce society daily – so why should the political apparatus that maintains the working day be genuinely democratic??

I still recommend voting as a means to use what little bullshit power they present you with, but just realize that qualitative changes won’t happen until people start organizing outside the Democrats and outside the electoral system more broadly. Everyone in power has accepted that capitalism is the “end of history” and understands politics as merely managing economic crises when they happen, not as a means for people to proactively meet their needs and hold real political power.

We need a labor/socialist party ASAP. Pour class conscious sentiment into it and focus it primarily around grassroots activism and labor organization. A concentrated attack over the last several decades from the establishment has decimated the left’s popularity, but recent capitalist crisis and growing class consciousness is reversing the tides. For that reason, now, we need to take advantage and build a party for the working class and eventual socialism. Reforms are good, as they’ll show people what’s possible and what their mobilization yields, but eventually we need to accept that a social revolution will be necessary to fully unravel capitalism and replace it with a genuine people’s democracy.

Now is the time. Propagate, organize, agitate, revolutionize.

The women of the property-owning classes will always fanatically defend the exploitation and enslavement of the working people by which they indirectly receive the means for their socially useless existence. Economically and socially, the women of the exploiting classes are not an independent segment of the population. Their only social function is to be tools of the natural propagation of the ruling classes. By contrast, the women of the proletariat are economically independent. They are productive for society like the men. By this I do not mean their bringing up children or their housework which helps men support their families on scanty wages. This kind of work is not productive in the sense of the present capitalist economy no matter how enormous an achievement the sacrifices and energy spent, the thousand little efforts add up to. This is but the private affair of the worker, his happiness and blessing, and for this reason nonexistent for our present society. As long as capitalism and the wage system rule, only that kind of work is considered productive which produces surplus value, which creates capitalist profit. From this point of view, the music-hall dancer whose legs sweep profit into her employer’s pocket is a productive worker, whereas all the toil of the proletarian women and mothers in the four walls of their homes is considered unproductive. This sounds brutal and insane, but corresponds exactly to the brutality and insanity of our present capitalist economy. And seeing this brutal reality clearly and sharply is the proletarian woman’s first task.
—  Rosa Luxemburg, “Women’s Suffrage and Class Struggle”
10

2007 - Gifs from an 18-minute documentary on the Ssangyong Motors factory occupation, produced by militant railroad workers from Doro Chiba in Japan.

The Ssangyong strike and factory occupation in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, ended on August 5, 2009, having lasted 77 days. It began when 1700 workers seized the small auto plant on on May 22. Yet 976 workers were able to successfully defend it to the end – against repeated military assaults by riot cops, company-hired goons, and scabs.

The settlement, signed by Ssangyong court receivership management and the Korean Metal Workers’ Union local president, was a negotiated defeat for the workers; the surrender of the factory was followed by felony charges and heavy sentences against occupiers, as well a massive lawsuit against the KMWU.

Despite this, the workers fought valiantly and uncompromisingly for over 2 months, demonstrating a militancy and class consciousness sorely lacking in the world today. The Ssangyong struggle is an inspiration to workers everywhere – especially as the current crisis has been used as a pretext to further attack the working class. It’s about time we turned the class war back on its feet; the Ssangyong struggle offers many lessons for fighting back.
[part 1] / [video]

3

@anarchlist @marbleflakes @blueymcphluey

These are fantastic points to tie into that last ask about division of labor and automation and post-capitalism.

It’s important to remember that there would likely be less work to do in a system that prioritized need over profit. If you cut out a hierarchal profit-driven market system and the accompanying jobs that only exist to maintain that setup (advertising, PR, sales people, etc.), you in turn cut down work to the extent that we recognize it as only economically-useful if it’s fulfilling the needs of people in society; all else ought to be removed from the economic realm and dealt with on a voluntary basis. As I’ve mentioned in a post a couple days ago, if you want to develop a device that flings cheetos into your mouth under socialism/communism, you should be able to pursue it, but it should be removed from a context where people must work positions like that for their daily sustenance. This logic applies double for genuinely artistic pursuits (I can’t foresee the cheeto-flinger being super popular or viable, but ¯\_(ツ)_/¯; it was just a hyperbolic example). Art, leisure, social relationships – we ought to de-commodify these things as much as possible, taking them back from the Weberian bullshit of capitalist alienation.

If capitalism focuses on unceasing search for profit through any outlet it can find, thus creating superfluous jobs entirely meant to extract more profits for the competing capitalists, then socialism and communism should aim to take the opposite approach – figure out what people need in society to live comfortably, focus the economy fundamentally on meeting those needs, cut out work through automation or obsolescence wherever possible, divvy up the remaining work, and you wind up with a GREATER SUPPLY of the fetishized value of capitalist society (freedom). If freedom isn’t the ability to influence affairs that impact your life (democratic economy) or the ability to pursue your passions during abundant leisure time, then what the hell even is freedom?

Sinners Never Sleep

Summary: Its simple. You train, you plan, you attack, you disarm, and you get out alive… So, if you knew what you were doing, then why was it so hard to get your assassin boyfriend Jungkook to meet your mafia parents- the head of the mafia?
Oh right, Rule 1: Never fall in love…especially with another gang member…

Preface/Preview Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Part 5 Part 6 Part 7 Part 8

Part 9

What?

You could only stare at him.

He was lying.

He had to be lying.

And if he wasn’t lying, he most definitely did not mean-

‘He took you from a partnering gang when you were a year old.’

‘NO!’ you shout at him, launching across the room to hit him and getting a few whacks in before you get trapped with your back against his chest, not hearing your labored breathing as you struggle in his grasp, huffing angrily as you push at his arms that were laced around you, until eventually you break out of his hold when he realizes you’re not going to give up.

You cant look back at him as you lunge back to the other side of the room, leaning heavily on the frosted, fractured window with one hand and blinking past the blurriness threatening your vision.

‘Y/N-‘

‘SHUT UP! Just- Shut….Up.’ you cut him off, making to look at him, but feeling dizzy with just the thought of actually cementing what he’d said as a reality.

‘How dare you…say that…about my father-‘

‘He’s not your-‘

‘DON’T SAY IT AGAIN!’ you scream at him, finally turning to look at him and seeing him having taken a few steps towards you, freezing with the force of your words and staring straight back at you.

You can see the effort it took him not to say anything, despite the fact you couldn’t actually look him in the eye as you sink to your knees on the floor, pressing the heels of your hands into your eyes as you bend over and touch your forehead to the dirty floorboards of the abandoned room. You were so distracted by the absurdity of what he was saying, that you didn’t even have the focus to be worried about him being dangerous, to even fathom that he might be lying, simply trying to calm yourself as your brain continues to reject what he was trying to tell you.

Because even if there was a tiny voice in your mind that was whispering to you that he could be lying…

Your automatic response was to believe him.

You’d always believed him.

‘You know you wont get away with this, don’t you?’

Keep reading

Today was tough. I refuse to say bad because as long as I’m running, I’m overly grateful. But today was just really hard. No pace felt easy (even at the slowest interval of the workout), my mind just wasn’t right, my motivation was struggling, breathing labored. But we grow from this.

We grow from this.

mattykinsel  asked:

How do you know the surplus theory of value is real? Like.. you know? And what about situations where you lend a hand for a neighbour and they give you cash for helping idk, clean their garage or something with them. Is that an appropriation of surplus value - how so? Thanks so much!

I’m not sure what you mean by the first part. We live in a class system where the owning class gets to handle the material surplus (generated by the working class) by virtue of their ownership over society’s productive gears; it’s an objective fact that class stratification is real, and class stratification is materially realized in the exploitation of labor and the appropriation of the surplus. 

As for the second part, the communist goal is to make money and market transactions obsolete, not to send some bureaucratic committee around constantly blocking them when they do show up. Like, we don’t concern ourselves with some feudal baron coming into our towns and forcing us into serfdom because we have advanced beyond feudalism, and to suggest that we arrange ourselves in that way is just, well, silly – no one would take you seriously. Modes of production change according to material factors, which in turn influence social factors, which in turn acclimate people to different ways of living, and so on and so forth. Once socialism/communism firmly cements itself, the idea of subjecting everything to hierarchical market transactions and private property rights will seem absolutely ridiculous. Common ownership over the common inheritance will just be taken for granted. 

There’s this persistent argument coming from ancaps and right-wing libertarian types: “If someone wants to sell their labor to me in exchange for a wage, who are you to stop me??” This overlooks the fact that pretty much everyone does not willingly submit to wage labor if they have, ya know, literally any other viable option. If your needs can be more readily provided for through democratic production, in a scenario where you actually get a say in the work you do, why would you “voluntarily” choose to work beneath someone else who takes the bulk of the final product? To reiterate the above point, imagine some feudal landlord asking a bourgeois revolutionary in 1730, “if the peasant prefers to be tied to my land and prefers to pledge loyalty to me, who are you to stop me??” In the end, the bourgeoisie gained power and used enclosures and state violence to drive those peasants into cities to become industrial proletariat, forcing them to adjust to a new system of production. Class stratification isn’t voluntary. 

That tangent aside, it’s about transforming the material realities of society by harnessing power and technology for democratic/grassroots ends, not about dogmatically trying to institute the changes from above. Hopefully I was clear in my explanation, and thanks for the question!

-Daividh