la-torre

anonymous asked:

In effetti sono andato a Parigi, città orribile come i francesi, ma devo dire che le donne sono molto più aperte e disponibili e molto meno “problematiche” delle ormai in estinzione italiane. La Francia batte l’Italia nel sesso 100 a 0 toccherà che ci si dia una svegliata!!

Allora, io sono iscritto alla newsletter di Change.org dove c’è chi periodicamente crea delle petizioni per salvare il lupo, il panda gigante, il delfino di fiume. Se sei interessato puoi iscriverti anche tu e farne partire una per “salvare la donna italiana dal rischio estinzione a causa di bracconaggio, deforestazione e cambiamenti climatici”. Ragazzi, SVEGLIATEVI!!!

Hi..!~ WeLcoME

Bueno, un dibujo de mi bebo Jeffs en su versión corrompida, es una prueba de unos nuevos estilos que ando practicando :“^) (OW THE EDGE)

Ahora un breve descripción del personaje u3u~ 

Universo: Corrupted E.B.D

Nombre: Jefferson 

Apodo: Jeffs

Ocupación: Científico 

Edad: 22

Altura: 1.90

Peso: 65kg

Descripción:Después de que su hija y novia se fueran de sus manos entro en un estado demencial dejándose dominar por el demonio que lo atormenta a diario, fue sobre-explotado creando una fuerza en un lugar llamado "la torre” creo las armas, comida, suplementos maquinaria etc del lugar, debido a su estrés constante a buscado el placer de relajarse torturando sexualmente a las personas que estén infectadas por el odio

Espero les guste el dibujo por que me duele la cabeza :“^) 

tagged by both of my baby girls @glorianas and @eleonoraditoledo

sign: virgo 

time: 6:09 PM 

favorite bands: ugh off the top of my head? the killers, HAIM, the arctic monkeys, little mix, the 1975, the temper trap, st. lucia, the neighbourhood, fall out boy, daughter, the national and so many more D: 

solo artists: rihanna, carrie underwood, foxes, ariana grande, lana del rey, marina diamandis, carly rae jepsen, emeli sande, banks, beyonce, amara la negra, miguel, bruno mars, sza, adele, dua lipa, vance joy, josef salvat, tove stryke, dagny, seinabo sey, sofi de la torre, chance the rapper ….like i could be here literally all day. 

song stuck in my head: Se Que Soy by Amara La Negra. im obsesseddd 

last show I watched: The Real Housewives of Atlanta 

what do i post: lol right now? star wars stuff, unfortunately got stuff (im keeping that @glorianas cause SCHMOOD.) music stuff, pretty people and whatever i feel like tbh?? my blog has always been all over the place. just like the mind of the person who runs it. (: 

what did i last google: how much potassium is too much potassium? i shit you not. 

do i get asks: lol i mean kinda? but i think i’d get more if i had anon on. a lot of angry anons. but i do get a lot of messages which are always lovely from lovely people. <3  

why did i choose this url: it’s what a character from Masters of Sex named her vagina and i was like WOW ME. and i never looked back. 

following: 245  

followers: 3496 on this blog. (waaaaaaaaaaaaay more than i deserve for someone who doesn’t like….contribute anything to fandom lol. but im grateful for every one on here.)

average hours of sleep: god my sleep schedule has been so fucked up for so long but like usually 6-7 hours? sometimes 8 if the circumstance are right. (like right after i’ve had a good shellacking) 

lucky number: 13 

what am i wearing: lol literally one of my bf’s t-shirts and a panties. 

dream job: a human rights attorney or like……….a music producer. OR BOTH. 

favorite food: shrimp cocktail 

last book i read: When A Scot Ties The Knot by Tessa Dare 

and im tagging: @natashabucks, @yoncelesbian, @loisfreakinglane, @goodqueenalys, @recklessflyboi, @reyys, @marvelsamwilson, @cassandradiabla, @sapphicsol, @silvertons and anyone else who wants to do this!!

10

XI Región de Aysén - Chile

  1. Golfo de Corcovado
  2. Península del Taitao
  3. Archipiélago de los Chonos
  4. Archipiélago de las Guaitecas
  5. Istmo de Ofqui
  6. Golfo de Penas
  7. Bahía Tarn
  8. Archipiélago Wellington
  9. Cordillera Sarmiento
  10. R.N. Katalalixar

The Dance of the 41 Maricones

On Sunday, November 17, 1901, police raided a private party and arrested forty-one men, nineteen of them were dressed as women. Those in drag were publicly humiliated by being forced to sweep the streets — “women’s work.” The 41 were taken to an army barracks and inducted into the Mexican army. At least some of them were then put on a train to Veracruz, sent by ship to the Yucatan, and made to serve in the army as it was putting down a Mayan insurgency.

Here is how El Popular reported the story on November 20:

Last Sunday night, the police of the Eighth Precinct were informed that in the house located at number 4 La Paaz Street, a ball was being held without the corresponding permit. They immediately moved in to surprise the culprits, and after having encountered numerous difficulties in trying to get the partygoers to open up, the police broke into the house’s patio where they found 42 individuals who were dancing to the excessively loud music of a local street band.

When they noted the presence of the police, some of those who were dressed in women’s clothing attempted to flee in order to change out of the clothes of the opposite sex; but as the police understood the gravity of the situation, they did not allow anyone to leave, and all 42 including those still dressed as women were taken to the station from which they were then sent to Belem Prison, charged with attacks on morality, and put at the disposition of the District Governor.

As a complement to the previous report, we will say that among those individuals dressed as women, several were recognized as dandies who are seen daily on Plateros Street.

These men wore elegant ladies’ gowns, wigs, false breasts, earrings, embroidered shoes, and a great deal of eye makeup and rouge on their faces.

Once the news hit the boulevards, all kinds of commentaries were made, and the conduct of those individuals was censured.

We will not provide our readers with further details because they are summarily disgusting.

It was said that many of those arrested came from highly respected families with ties to the government of dictator Porfirio Diaz. Some of the earliest newspaper reports, like this one, had it that 42 were arrested. That number later dropped to 41, which generated even more rumors. One had it that the elderly lady who owned the house was one of those arrested, and she was later released. Other, more sinister rumors had it that one of those arrested was one of Diaz’s nephews.

El Popular may have been reluctant to provide details, but in subsequent days it was happy to imagine the scene for its readers:

If only we had seen them in their resplendent hairdos, their fake cleavage, with their shiny sparkling earrings, with their falsies like the ones worn by anemic bimbos, with their corseted waists, their dancing-girl skirts like inverted tulips, their buttery tights, their shoes fringed with crimped gold thread and colored glass beads, and all of them bedaubed in white powder and rouge, prancing about in the fandango with their perfumed and curly mustaches.

On November 23, El Pas published this account of one group of prisoners being transferred to the train bound for Veracruz:

The men-only ball that was raided by the police continues provoking talk in all social circles, by virtue of the fact that many of those detained are perfectly well known, since among them are men who stroll day after day down the boulevards showing off their stylish and perfectly tailored suits and wearing sumptuous jewels.

As we stated in yesterday’s issue, 12 of those captured in the house on the fourth block of La Pazz were sent to Veracruz along with seven thieves who were also conscripted into the armed services.

At 5:30 in the morning, the hour at which attendance is taken in the 24th Battalion (that is being remitted to the port of Veracruz), those called on first were the 12 individuals who had been at the famed ball, and after number 13, who was apelado [a term for a rough, lower-class urban Mexican] was called, he replied on hearing his name, “Present, my Captain,but let me go on record as saying that I am being conscripted as a thief; but I’m not one of them,” and he pointed to the group of dancers.

This provoked the laughter of those present, because not even a thief was willing to be confused with the perfumed boys, as they are called by the soldiers from the barracks

A very amusing scene developed in the the barracks of the 24th Battalion when the repugnant ones arrived wearing their magnificent overcoats, along with hats and nice patent-leather shoes. The captain of the recruits made them all strip without delay, and then handed out the rough but honorable articles of clothing that are given to recruits.

With tears in their eyes, they stripped off all their clothes, some of them begging that they be allowed at least to keep their nice silk undergarments, a request that the captain denied, since, he told them, there they were just the same as everyone else. He didn’t even allow them to keep their socks, and they all began to cry as they put on the shoes that would replace their lovely patent leather ladies’ shoes.

The government paper, El Imparcial, took plains to deny that the army was foolish enough to send any girly-men to the front lines:

All of the prisoners have been sent to Yucatan, but not as it has been said to join the ranks of the valiant soldiers taking part in the campaign; they will be employed instead on such tasks as digging trenches, opening breaches, and raising temporary fortifications.

Today, the number 41 has become slang for homosexuality or, more specifically, “faggot” or maricon. As the former revolutionary general and National Defense Secretary Francisco L. Urquizo explained in 1965, “The influence of this tradition is so strong that even officialdom ignores the number 41. No division, regiment, or battalion of the army is given the number 41. From 40 they progress directly to 42. No payroll has a number 41. Municipal records show no houses with the number 41. No hotel or hospital has a room 41. Nobody celebrates their 41st birthday, going straight from 40 to 42. No vehicle is assigned a number plate with 41, and no police officer will accept a badge with that number.” Some of the early LGBT advocacy groups in Mexico incorporated the number into their names, just as many similar groups in the U.S. have leveraged “Stonewall” as a shorthand for the struggle for gay rights.

Estimado lobo feroz,

No soy de este cuento pero yo también me enamoré de lo imposible. Para nosotros no hay final feliz. La mujer que amo llora todas las noches en su cuarto, esperando a que llegue su príncipe azul y a mi me busca sólo para que le de fuego. Entiendo tu dolor y espero que Caperucita acepte tomar un café contigo pero de lo contrario, recuerda que amar no es capturar a la presa, sino cuidarla e incluso, a veces, desaparecer para que ella siga su camino.

Tu amigo,
El Dragón de la torre.
-Mr. R ϟ

Ora come ora è tutto molto complicato. Nessuno ti chiede di uscire per un vero appuntamento; loro chiedono solo di uscire giusto per , quindi dopo che hai accettato questo meraviglioso invito c’è la possibilità di passare 4 giorni ad ignorarvi a vicenda. Siete andati al cinema? Avete cenato insieme? L’avete fatto in macchina? Avete preso un volo per Parigi e vi siete ubriacati sotto la torre Eiffel? Chissenefrega! Era solo ”un’uscita” amichevole, giusto? Se provi a chiederti cosa avesse significato per lui quel tempo che avete passato insieme, c’è solo una persona che vi può rispondere : quella con cui siete usciti ”amichevolmente”. Ah,aspetta. Non puoi chiederglielo , ecco perchè.

Viviamo in un modo dove le persone hanno paura di provare dei sentimenti genuini, o se proprio va alla grande, hanno paura di mostrarli. Quando qualcuno è arrabbiato con te per qualcosa non riceverai una chiamata per parlarne e chiarire. Al posto di chiarire ci sarà un atteggiamento abbastanza patetico, dove tramite i social ti dedicano frasi, frecciatine e tutta la cattiveria che provano in piccole dosi. Se ti piace qualcuno, non glielo dici ; devi far vedere che ti interessa ma non troppo , sennò si prendono paura. Non ti piace questo modo di vivere moderno? Ca**i tuoi. La vita ”moderna” sembra una sorta di grande gioco e se non giochi secondo le regole che la società ti detta perdi, e se perdi ti ritrovi sola sotto la doppia trapunta d’estate a chiederti cosa hai sbagliato.

Non chiedere di uscire due notti di fila. Se hai scritto tu il primo messaggio l’ultima volta che vi siete sentiti , devi aspettare che sia lui a scriverti ora. Non scrivere tu per due volte di fila. Se alla fine decidete di intraprendere una relazione devi essere attenta a ogni parola che usi. Tutto è fatto tramite messaggi digitali. Fa strano chiamare qualcuno nel mondo moderno giusto per avere una conversazione o pianificare qualcosa da fare insieme, dobbiamo ansiosamente aspettare la risposta sul telefono, che forse neanche arriverà. Per capire se uno stron*o ha o no intenzioni serie con te ci metti gli anni che ti ci sono voluti per prendere la laurea in medicina.

Se qualcuno mi piace, voglio uscirci. Eppure a me sembra così semplice. O è così che dovrebbe essere. Ma nella società in cui viviamo, deve essere tutto complesso. Se parlo troppo con lui, sono una disperata. Se trovo sempre tempo per lui quando mi chiede di uscire, sono di nuovo disperata e non ho mai nulla da fare. Se gli ci vogliono 3 ore per rispondermi al messaggio, e ho il telefono in mano quando ricevo la sua risposta, devo aspettare sennò sembro nuovamente una disperata. E mi chiedo sempre : Perchè sto giocando a questo stupido gioco?

Perchè non posso chiamare qualcuno se ho piacere di parlarci? Perchè se dimostro che mi importa sono catalogata come disperata? Se mi arrabbio quando uno fa il cogli*ne sono un’acida pazza. Lasciate che vi dica una cosa; non voglio essere questo tipo di ragazza. Non lascerò che qualcuno controlli la mia persona. Nessuno dovrebbe avere questo potere su un’altra persona. Sono stanca sinceramente di vivere in un mondo in cui per ricevere l’attenzione di una persona devi dimostrare che te ne freghi di lei. Sono stanca di questo stupido gioco che donne e uomini usano per mantenere il controllo.

Questo è ciò che penso : smettiamo di essere dei completi idioti. Dobbiamo rispettare le persone e dir loro la verità. Se qualcuno ti rende felice, diglielo. Se non ti interessa qualcuno, diglielo. Non ignorate le persone nella speranza che loro spariscano.Direi che è arrivata l’ora di smettere di darsi appuntamento giusto per fare qualcosa e se poi qualcosa non va bene mandare stupide frecciatine tramite i social. Siate onesti.

#10 of 10 Most Popular News Galleries of 2017: Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

(Originally posted on October 12, 2017)

See the countdown of our most popular galleries of the year!

See the rest of our 2017 Year End features >>>

One man climbs 24 flights of stairs several times a day alongside dormant elevators. Street vendors hawk plastic washboards for $20. And families outstretch their hands as crews in helicopters drop supplies in communities that remain isolated.

This is life one month after Hurricane Maria slammed into the U.S. territory on Sept. 20 as a Category 4 storm that killed at least 48 people, destroyed tens of thousands of homes and left tens of thousands of people without a job. It was the strongest hurricane to hit Puerto Rico in nearly a century, with winds just shy of Category 5 force.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” retired schoolteacher Santa Rosario said as she scanned empty shelves at a supermarket in the capital of San Juan that had run out of water jugs — again.

Maria caused as much as an estimated $85 billion in damage across an island already mired in an 11-year recession. That has complicated and delayed efforts to restructure a portion of a $74 billion public debt load that officials say is unpayable. And it has thrust Puerto Rico’s territorial status into the international spotlight, reviving a sharp debate about its political future as the island attempts to recover from flooding, landslides and power and water outages.

Maria has also put Puerto Rico into the U.S. political spotlight with President Donald Trump on Thursday giving himself a “10” for his response to the devastation wrought by the hurricane. Asked when the 3.4 million U.S. citizens living there could expect power to be fully restored, Trump said it will take “a while.”

“There’s never been a case where power plants were gone,” Trump said, seated alongside Gov. Ricardo Rossello in the Oval Office. “So it’s going to be a period of time before the electric is restored.”

Roughly 80 percent of power customers remain in the dark, and another 30 percent are without water. Schools remain closed. Stoplights are not operating. And while nearly 90 percent of supermarkets have reopened, many have bare rows of shelves empty of goods ranging from water to bananas to canned tuna. (AP)

See more news-related photo galleries and follow us on Yahoo News Photo Twitter and Tumblr.

Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria

A man pushes a shopping cart past downed cables after Hurricane Maria hit the island in September, in Humacao, Puerto Rico, Oct. 20, 2017. The writing in the back reads “Puerto Rico will rise.” (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Sonia Torres poses in her destroyed home, while taking a break from cleaning, three weeks after Hurricane Maria hit the island, on Oct. 11, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man prepares to fill a generator with gas to power a bar on a darkened street with car headlights in the distance three weeks after Hurricane Maria hit the island, on Oct. 11, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Residents affected by Hurricane Maria wait in line for fuel donated by the Fuel Relief Fund in the municipality of Orocovis, outside San Juan, Puerto Rico, Oct. 10, 2017. (Photo: Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Efrain Diaz Figueroa cleans his hands after repairing the roof of the house of his sister destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Figueroa, who was visiting for a month at her sister Eneida’s house when the Hurricane Maria hit the area, also lost her home in the Arroyo community. He waits for a relative to come from Boston and take him to Boston. He says that he is 70 years old and all his life working can’t continue in these conditions in Puerto Rico. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Puerto Rico Hurricane Maria

A member of the Puerto Rican National Guard delivers food and water brought via helicopter to victims of Hurricane Maria, to the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rafael Reyes embraces his wife Xarelis Negron and his son Xariel as they stand next to thier belongings, in front of the remains of their home destroyed by Hurricane Maria, in the San Lorenzo neighborhood of Morovis, Puerto Rico, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017. The Reyes family lost all their belongings and their house, and are looking forward to being able to rebuild and continue their life. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Residents carry water and MREs received from FEMA about two weeks after Hurricane Maria swept through the island on Oct. 5, 2017 in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Residents in their section of the town remain without grid power or running water although a few have been able to acquire generators for power. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Resident Mirian Medina stands on her property about two weeks after Hurricane Maria swept through the island on Oct. 5, 2017 in San Isidro, Puerto Rico. Residents in her section of the town remain without grid power or running water. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage including most of the electrical, gas and water grid as well as agriculture after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, swept through. (Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A resident uses a plastic bag to move downed power cables so he can drive underneath them in a neighborhood following Hurricane Maria in Ceiba, Puerto Rico, Oct. 4, 2017. (Photo: Lucas Jackson/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Cars drive in the darkness in a neighbourhood that has no electricity, after Hurricane Maria in Caguas, Puerto Rico, Oct. 4, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Local residents ride a horse by a destroyed building after Hurricane Maria in Jayuya, Puerto Rico, Oct. 4, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Barria/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Kerialys Aldea de Jesus sits on bottled water at the Jose de Diego Elementary School where residents file FEMA forms for federal aid in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Las Piedras, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 2, 2017. Even those happy with the federal aid effort for the U.S. territory’s 3.4 million people said they resented President Donald Trump’s tweets about some Puerto Ricans being lazy and ungrateful. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man stands inside of a destroyed supermarket by Hurricane Maria in Salinas, Puerto Rico, Sept. 29, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Hurricane survivors receive food and water being given out by volunteers and municipal police as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 28, 2017 in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Sailors aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) observe as an MH-60 Sea Hawk helicopter transfers pallets of supplies from the fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) during replenishment-at-sea for continuing operations as part of Hurricane Maria relief efforts in Puerto Rico on Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Jacob A. Goff/U.S. Navy/Handout via Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Women hug as people line up to board a Royal Caribbean cruise ship that will take them to the U.S. mainland, in San Juan, Puerto Rico Sept. 28, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A resident bails water from a flooded home in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Catano, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Cody M. Freeman, an aviation electrician assigned to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU), carries a box of supplies at Jose Aponte de la Torre Airport in Puerto Rico, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo : Lance Cpl. Cody J. Ohira/U.S. Marine Corps via Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Irma Maldanado stands with Sussury her parrot in what is left of her home that was destroyed when Hurricane Maria passed through on Sept. 27, 2017 in Corozal, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

People wait in line as they hope to fill up their vehicles with gas in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on September 27, 2017 in Corozal, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Marta Sostre Vazquez reacts as she starts to wade into the San Lorenzo Morovis river with her family, after the bridge was swept away by Hurricane Maria, in Morovis, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. The family was returning to their home after visiting family on the other side. (Photo: Gerald Herbert/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Travelers stand in line outside of Luis Muoz Marn International Airport after Hurricane Maria disrupted flight service in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. President Donald Trump said he may temporarily suspend a law that restricts the use of foreign ships operating in U.S. waters and between U.S. ports in order to accelerate the delivery of aid to Puerto Rico, where his administration faces mounting criticism over its response to Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Alex Wroblewski/ Bloomberg)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Single mother Omayra Cruz, 44, returned from a food distribution with a box she would share with 4-year-old son Nene. But the two were still living without a roof, sleeping under the stars next to a pig pen, and a picture of the Last Supper. Their water tank had a few inches left. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

People affected by Hurricane Maria collect water in the mountains in Naranjito, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. The relief effort from Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico has so far been concentrated largely in San Juan, and many outside the capital say they’ve received little or no help. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Neighbors sit on a couch outside their destroyed homes as sun sets in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017. (Photo: Gerald Herbert/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

People affected by Hurricane Maria collect water in the mountains in Naranjito, Puerto Rico, Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017. (Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A dog is seen during the nightfall at a house destroyed by the passage of Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on September 26, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Rafael Robles-Ortiz kisses his mother Josefina Ortiz who is staying at the Hermanitas de los Ancianos Desamparados facility which cares for the elderly as they deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 26, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Mr. Robles-Ortiz is concerned for his mother and hopes aid — including fuel for the facilities generators, as well as food and medicine for his mother — gets through after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, devastated the island. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Workers repairs electrical installations after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 26, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

People make line at night at an ATM to withdraw money in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 25, 2017, where a 7pm-6am curfew has been imposed following impact of Hurricane Maria on the island. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A person waves to a passing helicopter from inside a damaged home as people deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 25, 2017 in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Flooded streets in San Juan on Sept. 25, 2017. Nearly one week after hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, residents are still trying to get the basics of food, water, gas, and money from banks. Much of the damage done was to electrical wires, fallen trees, and flattened vegetation, in addition to home wooden roofs torn off. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Residents from La Perla carry a piece of metal through the streets after Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Sept. 25, 2017. The island territory of more than 3 million U.S. citizens is reeling in the devastating wake of Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Two people sit in an apartment with a wall missing along the waterfront in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 25, 2017. Nearly one week after hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, residents are still trying to get the basics of food, water, gas, and money from banks. Much of the damage done was to electrical wires, fallen trees, and flattened vegetation, in addition to home wooden roofs torn off. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A doctor checks the eyes of Hilda Colon at a shelter set up at the Pedrin Zorrilla coliseum after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 25, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia/ Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A combination of NOAA Satellite images taken at night shows Puerto Rico before and after Hurricane Maria – Puerto Rico on July 24, 2014 (top) and after Hurricane Maria knocked out power grid in Puerto Rico taken on Sept. 24, 2017. (Photo: NASA/NOAA GOES Project/Handout via Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Family members collect belongings after hurricane force winds destroyed their house in Toa Baja, west of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria.
Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A house destroyed by hurricane winds is seen in Toa Alta, southwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Lizzy Alicea becomes emotional as she speaks about the lack of aide that is reaching her mother’s home town September 24, 2017 in Hayales de Coamo, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man uses his shirt to carry bottles of water during a distribution of relief items, after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

A man rides his bicycle through a damaged road in Toa Alta, west of San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 24, 2017 following the passage of Hurricane Maria. Authorities in Puerto Rico rushed on September 23, 2017 to evacuate people living downriver from a dam said to be in danger of collapsing because of flooding from Hurricane Maria. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Soldiers of Puerto Rico’s national guard distribute relief items to people, after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

Carmen Marrero takes a rest while she cleans debris from her house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

Source: Yahoo News Photo Staff

People fill containers with water on the street after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico September 24, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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Orisnela Solano hugs her daughter, Laura Goenaga as they attend a church service at the Parroquia Nuestra Senora de la Asuncion church September 24, 2017 in Aibonito, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Karlian Mercado,7, walks among the rubble that remains of her families home September 24, 2017 in Hayales de Coamo, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico experienced widespread damage after Hurricane Maria, a category 4 hurricane, passed through. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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Marry Ann Aldea loss everything at her house after the winds of hurricane Maria ripped away her roof. The mountain town of Juncos is one of the most affected after the pass of Hurricane María. Hurricane Maria passed through Puerto Rico leaving behind a path of destruction across the national territory. (Photo: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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Yadira Nieves carries her daughter as they look at water flowing over the road at the dam of the Guajataca lake after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guajataca, Puerto Rico, Sept. 23, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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U.S. Coast Guard personnel survey the damage to an oil dock after Hurricane Maria passed through the area on Sept. 23, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. (Photo: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

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People walk on a flooded street in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Aerial photo of the floadings in the costal town of Loiza, in the north shore of Puerto Rico on sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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Julio Ortiz Montanez drinks water at the Jose Robles Otero Elementary School after the passing of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, Friday, Sept. 22, 2017. Because of the heavy rains brought by Maria, thousands of people were evacuated from Toa Baja after the municipal government opened the gates of the Rio La Plata Dam. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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People stop on a highway near a mobile phone antenna tower to check for mobile phone signal, after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria, in Dorado, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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Line outside a Supermarket in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo for The Washington Post via Getty Images)

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People line up to buy gasoline at a gas station after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Alvin Baez/Reuters)

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Chairs are seen in front of a flooded house in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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Gloria Lynn cries next to a salon that was flooded after the rains related to the passage of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 22, 2017.(Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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Cars drive through a flooded road in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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People rest outside a damaged house after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

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Dead horses lay on the side of the road after the passing of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, Friday, September 22, 2017. (Photo: Carlos Giusti/AP)

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A man walks on a flooded street in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan Puerto Rico, late on Sept. 22, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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The day after Hurricane Maria made a direct hit on Puerto Rico, residents of Isla Palmeras (translated as Palmeras Island) a neighborhood in San Juan, are surrounded by water on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images)

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Damaged sail boats washed ashore are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images)

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Inhabitants stand in flood water in front of a house flooded in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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A man uses a stand up paddle board to row down a street flooded by Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. (Photo: Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images)

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