la-painting

I’m having a sketch day, so I won’t really have any new images worth uploading for a couple days. Instead, I wanted to share the older piece of mine that is my biggest inspiration for my current body of work that I am creating for Antler Gallery:

“Coragyps atratus”, 2015, Ball point pen, Ink pencils, Acrylic ink, Marker, Colored pencil, Graphite, and Gel pen on Hot-Pressed Watercolor Paper, 18 ¼ x 24in. sold.

This piece was my favorite from my first solo show. It was at the amazing, but sadly no longer around, Roq La Rue Gallery.

Enjoy!

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Salomé, 1909, by Paul Antoine de la Boulaye (1849-1926)

Many may not be familiar with the story of Salomé, and those that do not are probably quite unaware with exactly what they are looking at when staring right at this painting. First of all, artist Paul Antoine de la Boulaye truly had exquisite talent at giving his female subjects a subtle yet readable expression. Here we see, what you’d assume - and partly correct - a young, light-hearted dancing girl. A girl seemingly more childish than sultry. This, however, strongly contrasts with the story of the infamous Salomé. A young girl whose beautiful erotic dancing pleased her king so greatly, he granted her wish to have John the Baptist’s head on a platter. When paired with the description “an icon of dangerous female seductiveness,” this painting does not exactly hold it up. This painting is a perfect example of how knowing the story behind a work of art can be the key to “reading between the lines” of paintings.

Requested by @taymitsu.