la zine fest 2014

The third annual LA Zine Fest is happening in the parking garage of the Helms Bakery building on Sunday February 16, 2014! The event will feature OVER 180 ZINESTERS in one place for one amazing day! 

ALSO, there will be some amaZINE events: 

**Black Hill Press Presents: Zine to Publishing**
Tomas Moniz, Yumi Sakugawa, Kevin Staniec, Mark Todd, & Esther Pearl Watson
Moderated by Lilliam Rivera

**The Cartoon Utopia**
A multi-media presentation by Ron Regé Jr

AND….
**Keynote Speaker**
Jaime Hernandez (co-creator of Love & Rockets)
In conversation with Charles Hatfield, author and professor of English, CSUN

Throughout the day, check in on Mark Todd and Esther Pearl Watson’s Zine Hut, stop by NOMAD artspace’s table, and drop in in on activities in the Pop-Hop Zine Zone!

The LA Zine Fest is FREE, it’s close to the new Expo Line, and it’s going to blow your mind right out of your skull in the best way possible. We will see you there!!

RSVP on Facebook here! Invite your friends, your mom, your dog (and your mom’s dog), and we’ll see you on Sunday, February 16th!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Yumi Sakugawa

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

Short comic stories and illustrated essays about the cosmos, meditation, longing, memory, and time. Personal anxieties, desires and dreams disguised in the form of beta fish, one-eyed monsters, bunny ghosts, teenage girls and extraterrestrial visitors.

How did you get involved in making zines?

I made my first coimc zine in 2008 before i even knew what a zine was. And then two years later I had the good fortune of making friends with artists who were very involved in the zine community, and that was when I learned for the first time that people actually went to different zine conventions in different cities sharing their zines with other zine-makers from all over the country. I went to my first zine convention in Sacramento in 2010 and I have been hooked ever since.

Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Tiny Splendor

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

Our first zine, Rat Milk, was inspired by watching many a Simpsons episode and drinking warm bhang on cold winter nights. We would throw potlucks at our house and cover our dinner table with paper and our friends would draw on it. It got covered with strange food stains intermingled with depraved drawings of rats lactating, dogs on acid, caricatured faces, and mountains of details by friends and visitors. We did this a few times and scanned the results, which we screenprinted and turned into a zine. This was once upon a time, when Sanaa KhanMax Stadnik, and Cynthia Navarro were living together, and Kenny Srivijittakar lived down the street. It was a time of constant creation. Now that Cynthia and Kenny live in L.A. we’ve had to change up the collaborative process a bit. Name three of your influences and how they affected your work. We could name drop, but we are four people here, and that’s what seems to keep our work from getting stale—four brains are better than one. As far as the three things that keep us going, we’d be remiss if we didn’t mention printmaking, community, and food.

Printmaking, because all four of us studied it and fell in love with it; it gave us an appreciation for process-based thinking, working in layers, color separations, registration, discipline, stamina, experimentation, and working in limited editions. Working in multiples allows you to reach a wider audience than a single painting ever could. We’ve brought that mentality to running a small press.

Community is essential to what we do. If it weren’t for all our friends who laughed at our drawings, inspired us with theirs, and worked side by side with us in between countless glasses of whiskey, we’d have long ago lost our sanity and become boring introverts. We’re extremely lucky to be a part of a community of hardworking creative people—musicians, photographers, writers, framers—all stripes of people working with their hands.

Food is what keeps us going. I’m hungry right now. We all have a soft spot for anthropomorphized drawings of food, weird retro food iconography, and cooking and brewing and trying all the edible things out there. We had an art show this year devoted to coffee. We are working on a zine dedicated to hot dogs. Our best ideas have been hashed out over food and drink, reenergizing our brain batteries by indulging our taste buds.

Read the rest over at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Research and Destroy New York City

escribe your most recent zine.

Cats Hate Cops collects 150 years of newspaper articles about cats attacking police officers. My cat died recently and she had always hated the police, so I made a zine for her. She would hear the sirens off in the distance or hear their walkie talkies down the block and would stop whatever she was doing to go growl at them. She used to hide under the couch when she heard them, but she got braver over the years and started challenging them more…a radical trajectory that matched my own.

Of all the things you’ve ever made, zine-related or otherwise, what’s your one favorite?

I’m really proud of Cats Hate Cops, but that’s probably more just me being really proud of my cat.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

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GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Sonatina

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

My first zine (and comic) was a collaboration between myself and a good friend who I used to babysit. He, in 2007, was 11 and I was 21. The title of the comic was “Dunkin’ at Midnight” and it mostly focused on Lebron James’ transformation from a mid-dunk basketball superstar in the first panel to a headless, lost soul a million years later, at least that’s a rough summary of the first two pages.

Describe your most recent zine.

The Intern, published by Oily Comics, is my most recent zine. I think of it as a kind of love letter to a friend and the deepest corners of the suburbs.

Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

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GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Jesse Tise

What advice would you give to a first-time zinester or to an aspiring zinemaker?

Don’t worry about trying to reproduce your work in full color. Photocopy B&W can look really cool too. Go to Kelly Paper and get a bunch of different colored and textured paper stocks. Play around with the photocopier’s scanner and bypass tray and see how much you can mess around with your originals. Try out different binding methods for your book too.

What’s the best thing that ever happened to you because of zines?

Getting illustration jobs from art directors who received zines I sent them. Sending physical promos is still the best way for freelancers to promote their work in my opinion.

For more words of wisdom, check out the rest of the interview at LA Zine Fest.com!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Mend My Dress Press

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

We run a small press, publishing zine anthologies, and also a distro. We carry a lot of per-zines, because we love to read stories about the experiences of others.

How did you get involved in making zines?

Colleen made a zine in 2005 about her grandmother and has been making one shots ever since because there’s just too many ideas to make a regularly occurring serial. Neely started writing Mend My Dress years ago, when she was a messy college student. She will be writing until she is a messy fairy godmother to all of the lost bunnies.

What’s your favorite part of LA Zine Fest?

Its so wonderfully organized and it’s just a really great place to see friends from all over we hardly ever get to see, and a great place to find new zines to read. Not to mention the occasional celeb sighting! Plus, it seems appropriate to bust out the gold pants in LA, and any excuse for gold pants is a favorite.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

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Pre-order your t-shirt today for $15 and pick it up at the LAZF merch table on the day of the Fest! This design comes to us from LA cartoonist Mike Jasorka of Bombshell Comics, and is the official design for this year’s Fest. If you can’t pick up the t-shirt, we can mail it to you (for additional shipping and handling) after the day of the Fest–but you secure your shirt when you order in advance, so don’t be left cold and shirtless.  Here’s what the design looks like without a t-shirt–you’ll be seeing it around town on postcards and flyers really soon!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINSTER: Emily Parrish

What was your first zine about and when was it made?

Last year I teamed up with Kane Lynch to create Lake Cat, a zine which tells the 100% factual and true story of our search for a legendary vicious cat creature which lives in the Oakland hills.

Describe your most recent zine.
Most recently I have been working on Sunrise, a book which illustrates the oldest easter celebration in the country. It deals with ritual, music and community.

Of all the things you’ve ever made, zine-related or otherwise, what’s your one favorite?
In addition to drawing and printmaking I work with textiles, primarily weaving. In the last few years I’ve been aiming to bring my fiber work and printed work together, resulting in a series of pieces, some more aesthetically pleasing than others, which I’m most excited about. My current fave is a woven wall hanging incorporating printed strips.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

THE BIG DAY HAS ARRIVED...IT'S LA ZINE FEST 2014!

Yep! It’s here! Aside from our tablers, we have a bunch of events, panels and workshops happening throughout the day!

We are so pumped to see you! Come out to 8711 Washington Blvd. to the Helms Bakery parking garage to get your zines & comix fix! For more info about how to get there, click here

Tabling hours are from 10:00 - 5:00 PM, with our keynote speaker, Jaime Hernandez, speaking from 5:15-6:45 PM.

YES!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Vice Versa Press

Describe your most recent zine.

The latest official zine released by Vice Versa Press is “Guide to Being Alone” which is a quick and dirty publication that empowers readers to embrace the chaos of solitude. It has a corresponding soundtrack which includes various hip and danceable tracks; nothing too depressing.

Name three of your influences and how they affected your work.

Aaron Cometbus, Lester Bangs, Janelle Hessig. Reading Aaron Cometbus’ work inspired me to get off my ass and begin writing. Cometbus also helped motivate some of my personal adventures worth writing about, and helped me find my identity in the love/hate relationship that is punk rock. Lester Bangs is (was) a god. I will channel his writing abilities and ballsy-ness that makes his work timeless, exciting, and over-all incredibly well informed. Janelle Hessig is a babe zinester with the raddest writing ‘tude ever. When I found her zine “Tales of Blarg” I was absolutely blown away. She inspires me and I strive to collect more of her work.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Cheer the Eff Up

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

Cheer the Eff Up is a zine about punks, depression, suicide, fatherhood & cake. It’s sad but also kind of funny.

How did you get involved in making zines?

I started in high school, writing all this silly, angsty, damn-the-man stuff with friends. We called it quits after a little while, but zines never really left my mind. Fast forward many years; on a whim, I went to the 1st Chicago Zine Fest. It was a HUGE wake up call. I was blown away by how big & thriving the zine community was. As a kid, I thought of zines as a local thing, you know, to pass around among a few friends. I hadn’t realize that people were linked all over the world through zines. I started working on Cheer the Eff Up #1 soon thereafter. It was going to be just a thing to cheer up a friend, & I guess to think about fatherhood. It quickly became a bigger project.

What’s your favorite part of LA Zine Fest?

I love sharing my zines, but my favorite part is just reconnecting with good friends at the fest. I’ve met some really incredible people through zines; I both treasure them as friends, & admire their work as zinesters. Tabling at zine fests are often the only occasions when I get to see them again. It’s like a big reunion.

Read the rest of the interview with Jonas at the LA Zine Fest blog!

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GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Mixtape Comics Describe your most recent zine.

My most recent zine is Frankie Comics #1: a collection of comic strips based on interactions with my cat, Frankie. I started the strip as a exercize while I was in grad school. It accidentally gained a following online, so I’ve decided to keep doing it. At least for a little while longer.

Name three of your influences and how they affected your work.

A lot of my recent focus has been on the technical aspects of simple, visual storytelling. Artists who cartoon simply, utilizing the grid when laying out their pages. Over the last few month, I keep going back to Everything We Miss by Luke Pearson, Primates by Maris Wicks, and A User’s Guide to Neglectful Parenting by Guy Delisle. While they’re three very different types of stories, they all successfully utilize simple visual styles to tell a story quickly and without much dialog. Which I appreciate.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Portland Button Works

Describe your work in two sentences or less.

I’ve been writing the zine Brainscan since 1997, published the book Stolen Sharpie Revolution: A DIY Zine Resource, and sing in the zine themed band The Copy Scams. In 2012 I started Portland Button Works and zine distro, an online and brick and mortar shop in Portland, Oregon that sells zines, books, and make custom pinback buttons.

Where are your favorite places (in your neighborhood or online) to find new zines?

In my mail box and in the Portland Button Works shop!

What are you working on for the Fest this year?

I hope to have a new issue of Brainscan and possible a new printing of Stolen Sharpie Revolution and of course lots of new zines in the distro.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Mark Wang

Describe your most recent zine.

Its a comic about a dog that falls asleep. Its 24 pages. So I guess that’s exciting.

Of all the things you’ve ever made, zine-related or otherwise, what’s your one favorite?

In college I made this huge-ish poster size comic that was about being an “ABC”. I was trying my hardest to rip-off Chris Ware, but keep my drawing style. I remembered clearly when working on it I thought “Yes. This is it. I’m doing comics.” I really thought I was on my way to becoming the next Chris Ware or some other bs, but looking back on it the piece wasn’t all that great and I’m not going to be the next Chris Ware. Yea, but I still had fun and I still thought I was doing comics, and now I comic, or at least try to.

PS. and I still love Chris Ware.

Read the rest of the interview at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Maranda Elizabeth 

Describe your work in two  sentences or less.

I write magnificently personal  stories about mental health & illness, writing & creativity, self-care & support, femme identity, borderline personality disorder, genderqueerosity, and how to cultivate meaningful, magical, artistical days.

Where are your favourite places (in your neighbourhood or  online) to find new zines? 

fight-boredom.com

mendmydress.com

poczineproject.tumblr.com

torontoqueerzinefair.tumblr.com

and my friends & pen pals.

To read the rest, check out the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Emily Alden Foster

What are your three favorite small-press/DIY publications?

I’m sure everyone said this, but it’s really hard to pick just three things. The “Hero Land” series by Esther Pearl Watson is one of my all-time favorites, because who doesn’t like ridiculously frugal superheroes? I also really love anything made by my dear friend and table-mate Jennie Yim, who makes great autobio comics. I’m really looking forward to the conclusion of her “An Illustrated History of Personal Failure” series. It’s just as good as the title makes it sound. Another recent favorite is “Dad Tweets” by Amy Burek. True to the title, it’s a mini-zine collection of her dad’s tweets. I have it sitting out on my bookshelf and whenever people look at it I have to convince them that the contents are real tweets from a real dad, because they don’t believe it’s possible for a dad to be so funny.

What advice would you give to a first-time zinester or to an aspiring zinemaker?

You can do it! There are so many things you could do it might seem overwhelming, so maybe just start with something simple. My first zine was literally one sheet of paper folded in half one time, with a story and a picture, and people loved it. Or, at least, no one lit it on fire in my presence, so I assume they loved it.

Read the rest over at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Sparkplug Books

What are you working on for the Fest this year?
I personally won’t have anything new, but I will have two new books from Sparkplug – Reich #11 by Elijah Brubaker and Hungry Summer by Asher Craw. I’m very excited about both!

How did you get involved in making zines?
I’ve always been a writer/artist and aware of zines since I got my first one from a riot grrl out of Baraboo, Wisconsin. I think at some point in my 20s I had a “Oh yeah, I can do this too!” moment. But mostly I blame Nicole Georges and her totally excellent Invincible Summer for getting me started making zines.

Read the rest over at the LA Zine Fest blog!

GET TO KNOW YOUR ZINESTER: Truckface

Describe your most recent zine.

my most recent issue of truckface is about my fourth and part of my fifth years of teaching. it contains stories leading up the chicago teachers strike and the eventual strike. it is text heavy, messy and hopefully enjoyable.

Name three of your influences and how they affected your work.

my good friend heather from dig deep and stranger danger distro influences me to stay positive. my favorite zine writer of all time, mimi thi nguyen of slander, influences me to remain forever enraged, stay active and continue thinking critically. and old man william faulkner changed the way that i viewed writing and literature. without his creativity, i would not be an english teacher or probably would not have spent so much of my life focused on writing.

Read the rest at the LA Zine Fest blog!