la santa sede

The etymology meaning of the word VATICAN.

Sanskrit ‘vati’ means “it blows” that is linked with the Old High German ‘feder’ for father there is an exact match to the Sanskrit with the German ‘vati’ that translates as “father.”

The ‘VATI’-can

Vati-can would mean the “dog father” since ‘can’ (from vati-CAN) is the Spanish word for “dog.” As related to the dogstar Sirius that resigns in the constellation CANis Major.

“Dog” spelled backwards is “god” and thus ‘Vati-can’ would also mean the “godfather.” in which the pope is also known as the “papa” since the Spanish ‘pope’ means “papa.”

The Italian ‘vedere’ (veder, vader, feder, etc.) translates into English as “see.” it is part of the reason why the ‘pope’ is also referred to as the “holy see.”

La Santa Sede means “the holy see/seat/headquarters” which shows you who is keeping everyone from spiritually evolving.

anonymous asked:

I thought that the adjective always came after the noun. But lately I've been seeing quite a few examples of the adjective coming first. Do you know why that is? Or are there certain rules for that?

Most of the time adjectives come second. But there are special cases where it can go first.

…And certain adjectives that go first that change the meaning a bit.

Certain times, adjectives have to go in front of nouns. For instance, possessives have different forms for either… where mi or tu go in front but mío/a or tuyo/a go in back. And when they’re in back they’re more emphatic there.

Other times it’s the demonstratives - More on Demonstratives

Another one to know is cualquier vs. cualquiera - More on Cualquier(a)

There are also ordinal numbers which I’ll cover later on in this post but - Ordinal Numbers in Depth

Along with ordinal numbers, ones that go first include “first”, “last”, “second-to-last”… etc.

There is also bueno/a which turns to buen in front… malo/a which turns to mal in front… grande which turns to gran in front… and the cases of mejor and peor which are “better” and “worse”.

Those get covered more down the line.

Others like ”many”, “fewer”, “more”, “less”… always go in front but the good news with those is that you’ve probably been using them that way for so long it’s second nature.

So here we go. Adjective placement in Spanish:

In MOST cases, Spanish adjectives come AFTER the noun.

This is fairly basic.

La flor anaranjada / naranja. - The orange flower.

La casa blanca. - The white house. [La Casa Blanca = the White House]

La luna llena. - The full moon

La mujer casada. - The married woman.

El chico bajo. - The short boy.

La blusa ajustada. - The tight/tight-fitting blouse.

There are two main reasons that an adjective will come before the noun. The first one is the most common, the second one is just something you have to get used to and be mindful of when using Spanish.

1. Emphasis - Some adjectives are placed in front of the nouns to indicate emphasis. This is very common for emphatic writing or speaking. Doing this has the sense of putting “really” in the sentence; what you’re doing is showcasing the adjective. It would be the equivalent of older English that says “the moon so bright”; la clara luna. You’re placing an emphasis on the adjective.

  • The Good. It’s very good when used sparingly. It’s often used in writing that’s particularly geared towards action, fantasy or sci-fi. For a native speaker of Spanish these are the things that draw them in. Syntax in English is a bit more fluid than Spanish, but when an adjective is placed in front of the noun, you’ve basically put a big sign on the adjective saying THIS IS IMPORTANT for some reason.
  • The Bad. If someone did this to you a lot in English, it would sound like a used car salesman trying to make a sale. That is how emphatic it sounds in Spanish. If used in quick succession for no real purpose, it’s distracting. Keep in mind that the average native speaker of Spanish puts their adjectives BEHIND the noun 70-90% of the time. What you’re doing is incredibly distracting. You’re making a reader halt what they’re doing to pay attention. And if you keep doing that, it makes it tedious and very start-and-stop.
  • The Ugly. If used correctly, it’s rather nice. If you use it too much you’ve just indicated to the Spanish-speaking audience that you are either very insistent on everything or that you don’t know the language. Worse, you might indicate that you’re pushing English word order onto Spanish.

Empathic Examples

Es un chico bueno. - He’s a good kid.

Es un buen chico. - He’s a very good boy. [either said of children in a doting way or “good boy” for dogs]

Es una blusa rosada. - It’s a pink blouse.

Es una rosada blusa. - It’s a really pink blouse. [this implies “hot pink” or “wow I have never seen something that pink before and it might be hurting my eyes”]

Es una ciudad grande. - It’s a big city.

Es la gran ciudad. - It’s the big city. [implies a capital city or one that’s very vibrant and full of people; may imply a cultural (or physical) Mecca for something.]

Es la luz de la luna blanca. - It’s the light of the white moon.

Es la luz de la blanca luna. - It’s the light of the pure white moon. [this sounds very literary as if you’re making the moon’s whiteness into a symbol and many people will read it to emphasize a kind of “purity” or “serenity”.]

El sol abrumador nos marchita. - The hot sun makes us wilt.

El abrumador sol nos marchita. - The sweltering sun makes us wilt. [This sounds very literary; as if the sun is a symbol for “authority” or someone with lots of power who’s oppressive.]

Es un arte bello. - It’s a beautiful art(form).

Son las bellas artes. - They’re the fine arts. [las bellas artes always means “fine arts”; which typically implies a lot of culture or significance]

Es la nieve blanca. - It’s white snow.

Es la blanca nieve. - It’s pure white snow. [This is why Snow White in Spanish is Blancanieves- because the whole symbolism of her name rested on the audience seeing her as pale, pure, noble and beautiful.]

*The most common adjectives to see in front of nouns are malbuen,  gran, mejor “best” and peor “worst”. When it’s in front of a masculine article malo turns to malbueno to buen, and grande to gran. Also very common is santo/a meaning “holy”. The final one that’s very common are the ordinal numbers which extends to entonces ”then [adjectival]”, último/a “last” etc.

**Also don’t forget the demonstratives of “this”, “that”, “these”, “those”, as well as the possessive adjectives like “my”, “your”, “his”, “our” etc. These also go in front.

Es un buen amigo. - He’s a really good friend.

Es de mal agüero. - It’s a bad omen. | Es de buen agüero. - It’s a good omen.

Es la Santa Sede. - It’s the Holy See. [A “See” in this sense means “seat”; the Vatican.]

Es la Santa Iglesia Católica. - It’s the Holy Catholic Church.

La gran meca del cine es Hollywood. - The great movie Mecca is Hollywood.

Es el gran y poderoso heroe. - It’s the great and mighty hero.

Es la última vez que te lo digo. - This is the last time I tell you.

El enero es el primer mes. - January is the first month.

Trabajamos en el noveno piso / la novena planta. - We work on the 9th floor/story.

Es el mejor jugador del equipo. - He’s the best player on the team.

Esta es la tercera vez. - This is the third time.

La peor decisión es la indecisión. - The worst decision is indecision.

2. Changes Meaning

The adjectives that change meaning are very few and more idiomatic. But they are also very common, so you’ll probably need to know them or at least have them in mind.

  • único/a - In front, único/a means “only”.
    In back único/a means “one of a kind”, “unique” or when talking about siblings means “an only child”.
  • propio/a - In front, propio means “one’s own” as in “property”.
    In back, propio/a means “appropriate” or “fits the occasion”.
  • gran / grande - In front, gran means “great”.
    In back, grande means “large” as in size.
  • solo/a - In front, solo/a emphasizes “just one”.
    In back, solo/a typically means “alone” or “lonely”.
  • nuevo/a - In front, nuevo/a means “recent” or something that “just came out”.
    In the back, nuevo/ameans “newly made”.
  • antiguo/a - In front, antiguo/a means “ancient”, “outdated”, “obsolete” or “old-timey”.
    In back, antiguo/a gets the meaning of “antique”.
  • viejo/a - In front, viejo/a means “long-time”.
    In back, viejo/a means “old” as in age.
  • mismo/a - In front, mismo/a means “same”.
    In the back, mismo means “self” as in “myself”, “himself”, “ourselves” etc.
  • pobre - In front, pobre means “pitiful” or “miserable”.
    In the back, pobre refers to “poor” as in “no money”.
  • triste - In front, triste means “disastrous” or “disgraceful”.
    In the back, triste means “sad” as in the emotion.
  • lejano/a - In front, lejano/a means “far-off” or “faraway”.
    In back, lejano/a means “distant” as in a relative or a physical location.

*****These aren’t all of them, but they’re some of the most common ones.

Es una chica única. - She’s a unique child.

Es hija única. - She’s an only child.

Es la única manera. - It’s the only way.

Es la única persona. - She’s the only person.

Es mi vestido propio. - It’s my appropriate dress. 

Es mi propio vestido. - It’s my own dress.

Es una gran mujer. - She’s a great wife.

Es una mujer grande. - She’s a big woman. 

Es la gran ciudad. - It’s the great city.

Es una ciudad grande. - It’s a big city.

Es un solo chico. - It’s just one boy. 

Es un chico solo. - It’s a lonely boy.

Es mi nuevo libro. - It’s my brand-new book.

Es nuestro libro nuevo. - It’s our newly made book. [Often used for books to mean “the latest edition”]

Ella sabe mucho sobre antigua Grecia. - She knows a lot about Ancient Greece.

Ella sabe mucho sobre los relojes antiguos. - She knows a lot about antique clocks.

Son viejos amigos de ella. - They’re long-time friends of hers.

Los amigos de ella son viejos. - The friends of hers are elderly.

Es la misma persona. - It’s the same person.

Ella misma no sabe por qué. - She herself doesn’t know why.

La pobre mujer no tiene nada. - The pitiful woman has nothing.

El hombre pobre no tiene nada. - The poor man has nothing.

Es un triste principio de la Navidad. - It’s a terrible start to Christmas.

Muchas personas tristes lloran. - Many sad people cry.

Había una vez en la lejana tierra de… - Once upon a time in the faraway land of…

Es un primo lejano. - He’s a distant cousin.

anonymous asked:

Buona sera. Potresti mettere il tag dei tuoi colleghi di tumblr con vicino scritto di cosa si occupano? Curiosita

Dunque,

3nding è sindaco di un piccolo paese medievale sulla collina accanto alla mia.

pokotopokoto divide il suo tempo tra il doppiaggio del remake di Kiss Me Licia e un qualcosa che ha a che fare con l'ingegneria dei prodotti deodoranti per la persona (fa test sui colleghi, credo).

scarligamerluss fa giornalismo d'inchiesta in Lombardia travestendosi da militante leghista ma poi la sera si fa una doccia bollente per togliersi l'odore di dosso.

mariaemma penso che cloni gatti per un laboratorio genetico di Volgograd.

brondybux mi disegna i loghi per i Kit Antizombie che presto venderò online.

tentochu cuce e vende per corrispondenza bambole spaventose per bambini, ma la maggiore fonte di guadagno è una percentuale sui guadagni per le visite che l'Albo degli Psicanalisti le passa sottobanco.

microlina è una supporter di Richard Armitage e nel terzo film dello Hobbit potrete vederla in un blooper nel quale strappa di mano l'Arkengemma a Thorin dicendo che è pericolosa per la sua salute mentale.

iceageiscoming e masuoka hanno un negozio di biciclette da corsa in franchising e vendono pure quelle ridicole e attillate tutine fluorescenti che fanno salire l'omicidio stradale non appena le vedi.

gianlucavisconti fa lo scherzone di far finta di assaggiare con il dito le urine dei suoi pazienti e poi vende a Paperissima i video della gente che vomita e sviene.

sovietcigarettesandstuff è pagata profumatamente dagli Illuminati per fare traduzioni simultanee sbagliate quando Putin e Obama discutono di politica economica.

ze-violet è segretaria di CGIL, CISL e UIL contemporaneamente ma deve cambiarsi velocemente d'abito in una cabina del telefono tra un incontro e l'altro per non farsi scoprire.

iltriceratopoingiardino è ambasciatore del Giappone presso la Santa Sede.

catastrofe insegna le gif all'Università

gigiopix è il Capo Ingegnere Progettista della prossima Morte Nera ma questa volta ha detto che non mette condotti d'areazione ma un semplice Pinguino DeLonghi gigante.

firewalker rompe i coglioni a chi vorrebbe mangiare un po’ come cazzo gli pare.

spaam lavora in segreto al vaccino per la prossima Apocalisse Zombie.

leukolenoshera fa le prove di rilevazione del flashpoint dei giocatori di rugby.

thec8h10n4o2 è bestiologa genetista bioevoluzionista.

heresiae picchia le gente con la krav maga e poi lascia il mio biglietto da visita.

guerrepudiche e carnaccia tetteculano.

cosipegioco si occupa di selezione del personale maschile nella sua azienda ed è sempre sconsolata per la scarsità estetica.

quartodisecolo è costretto a fare le app per gli utenti Myspace e poi si incazza.

madonnaliberaprofessionista bracca nazisti per il Simon Wiesenthal Center e nel tempo libero percula libermerde fascioleghiste.

emmanuelnegro sparisce e ricompare come un ninja comunista.

lasbronzaconsapevole gestisce una catena di sushifood citata anche nella Guida Galattica per Autostoppisti.

axeman72 è MacGyver.

selene dice ad Axeman72 di darsi un contegno e di togliere la resina per la stampante 3D dal pelo del gatto.

soggetti-smarriti gestisce un'agenzia investigativa specializzata nei furti dei nomi di tambleri.

maewe presto prenderà in carico tutti i miei ask che cominciano con ‘Dottore, la mia vagina è…’.

quattroperquattro è il direttore di un cinema che fa spoiler agli spettatori che devono ancora entrare.

ilpessimista lavora nel Dipartimento di Filosofia Esistenzialista per Genti Disilluse Ma Non Troppo.

curiositasmundi è il fratello maggiore di David Karp.

kitchenbrain vai a fare in culo tanto non riuscirò mai a cucinare come te.

yomersapiens è in missione per conto di Dio.

coqbaroque ha una pistola caricata a succo di limone e non ha paura a schizzarlo negli occhi alle teste di cazzo.

tsuki-no-hikari vende i sigari e fa i dolci buonissimi e presto venderà i sigari al cioccolato.

autolesionistra è Stefano Benni che ha aperto un tumblr.

falcemartellol è Falcemartellol.

Questi sono solo alcuni, quindi presto integrerò.

Se qualcuno si doveva ritenere inoffensivo in quell'epoca, era l'invecchiato e disilluso colonnello Aureliano Buendía, che a poco a poco aveva perduto ogni contatto con la realtà della nazione. Rinchiuso nel suo laboratorio, il suo unico rapporto col resto del mondo era il commercio dei pesciolini d'oro. Uno dei vecchi soldati che avevano sorvegliato la sua casa nei primi giorni della pace andava a venderli nei villaggi della palude, e tornava carico di monete e di notizie. Che il governo conservatore, diceva, con l'appoggio dei liberali, stava riformando il calendario in modo che ogni presidente rimanesse cento anni al potere. Che finalmente si era firmato il concordato con la Santa Sede, e che era venuto da Roma un cardinale con una corona di diamanti e su un trono d'oro massiccio, e che i ministri liberali si erano fatti ritrarre in ginocchio in atto di baciargli l'anello. Che la soubrette di una compagnia spagnola, di passaggio dalla capitale, era stata sequestrata nel suo camerino da un gruppo di uomini mascherati, e la domenica dopo aveva ballato nuda nella residenza estiva del presidente della repubblica. «Non parlarmi di politica» gli diceva il colonnello. «Noi ci occupiamo di vendere pesciolini.» Le dicerie del pubblico, che il colonnello non volesse sapere nulla della situazione politica del paese perché stava arricchendosi col suo laboratorio, provocarono le risate di Ursula quando giunsero al suo orecchio. Col suo terribile senso pratico, lei non poteva capire quale fosse il guadagno del colonnello, che cambiava i pesciolini con monete d'oro, e poi trasformava le monete d'oro in pesciolini, e così via, di modo che era costretto a lavorare sempre di più a mano a mano che aumentavano le vendite, per soddisfare un esasperante circolo vizioso. In verità, ciò che gli interessava non era il guadagno ma il lavoro. Aveva bisogno di tanta concentrazione per incastrare squame, incastonare minuscoli rubini negli occhi, laminare branchie e montare pinne, che non gli restava un solo vuoto da riempire con la delusione della guerra. Così assorbente era l'attenzione che gli richiedeva la raffinatezza del suo artigianato, che in poco tempo invecchiò più che in tutti gli anni di guerra, e la posizione gli piegò la spina dorsale e la millimetria gli sciupò la vista, ma la concentrazione implacabile lo premiò con la pace dello spirito.
—  Gabriel García Márquez, Cent'anni di solitudine

milliarc  asked:

Could you please explain when you put the adjective before the noun? It's quite confusing as usually the noun goes first... Thanks!

[Copied from a past ask]

Most of the time adjectives come second. But there are special cases where it can go first.

…And certain adjectives that go first that change the meaning a bit.

Certain times, adjectives have to go in front of nouns. For instance, possessives have different forms for either… where mi or tu go in front but mío/a or tuyo/a go in back. And when they’re in back they’re more emphatic there.

Other times it’s the demonstratives - More on Demonstratives

Another one to know is cualquier vs. cualquiera - More on Cualquier(a)

There are also ordinal numbers which I’ll cover later on in this post but - Ordinal Numbers in Depth

Along with ordinal numbers, ones that go first include “first”, “last”, “second-to-last”… etc.

There is also bueno/a which turns to buen in front… malo/a which turns to mal in front… grande which turns to gran in front… and the cases of mejor and peor which are “better” and “worse”.

Those get covered more down the line.

Others like ”many”, “fewer”, “more”, “less”… always go in front but the good news with those is that you’ve probably been using them that way for so long it’s second nature.

So here we go. Adjective placement in Spanish:

In MOST cases, Spanish adjectives come AFTER the noun.

This is fairly basic.

La flor anaranjada / naranja. - The orange flower.

La casa blanca. - The white house. [La Casa Blanca = the White House]

La luna llena. - The full moon

La mujer casada. - The married woman.

El chico bajo. - The short boy.

La blusa ajustada. - The tight/tight-fitting blouse.

There are two main reasons that an adjective will come before the noun. The first one is the most common, the second one is just something you have to get used to and be mindful of when using Spanish.

1. Emphasis - Some adjectives are placed in front of the nouns to indicate emphasis. This is very common for emphatic writing or speaking. Doing this has the sense of putting “really” in the sentence; what you’re doing is showcasing the adjective. It would be the equivalent of older English that says “the moon so bright”; la clara luna. You’re placing an emphasis on the adjective.

  • The Good. It’s very good when used sparingly. It’s often used in writing that’s particularly geared towards action, fantasy or sci-fi. For a native speaker of Spanish these are the things that draw them in. Syntax in English is a bit more fluid than Spanish, but when an adjective is placed in front of the noun, you’ve basically put a big sign on the adjective saying THIS IS IMPORTANT for some reason.
  • The Bad. If someone did this to you a lot in English, it would sound like a used car salesman trying to make a sale. That is how emphatic it sounds in Spanish. If used in quick succession for no real purpose, it’s distracting. Keep in mind that the average native speaker of Spanish puts their adjectives BEHIND the noun 70-90% of the time. What you’re doing is incredibly distracting. You’re making a reader halt what they’re doing to pay attention. And if you keep doing that, it makes it tedious and very start-and-stop.
  • The Ugly. If used correctly, it’s rather nice. If you use it too much you’ve just indicated to the Spanish-speaking audience that you are either very insistent on everything or that you don’t know the language. Worse, you might indicate that you’re pushing English word order onto Spanish.

Empathic Examples

Es un chico bueno. - He’s a good kid.

Es un buen chico. - He’s a very good boy. [either said of children in a doting way or “good boy” for dogs]

Es una blusa rosada. - It’s a pink blouse.

Es una rosada blusa. - It’s a really pink blouse. [this implies “hot pink” or “wow I have never seen something that pink before and it might be hurting my eyes”]

Es una ciudad grande. - It’s a big city.

Es la gran ciudad. - It’s the big city. [implies a capital city or one that’s very vibrant and full of people; may imply a cultural (or physical) Mecca for something.]

Es la luz de la luna blanca. - It’s the light of the white moon.

Es la luz de la blanca luna. - It’s the light of the pure white moon. [this sounds very literary as if you’re making the moon’s whiteness into a symbol and many people will read it to emphasize a kind of “purity” or “serenity”.]

El sol abrumador nos marchita. - The hot sun makes us wilt.

El abrumador sol nos marchita. - The sweltering sun makes us wilt. [This sounds very literary; as if the sun is a symbol for “authority” or someone with lots of power who’s oppressive.]

Es un arte bello. - It’s a beautiful art(form).

Son las bellas artes. - They’re the fine arts. [las bellas artes always means “fine arts”; which typically implies a lot of culture or significance]

Es la nieve blanca. - It’s white snow.

Es la blanca nieve. - It’s pure white snow. [This is why Snow White in Spanish is Blancanieves- because the whole symbolism of her name rested on the audience seeing her as pale, pure, noble and beautiful.]

*The most common adjectives to see in front of nouns are malbuen,  gran, mejor “best” and peor “worst”. When it’s in front of a masculine article malo turns to malbueno to buen, and grande to gran. Also very common is santo/a meaning “holy”. The final one that’s very common are the ordinal numbers which extends to entonces ”then [adjectival]”, último/a “last” etc.

**Also don’t forget the demonstratives of “this”, “that”, “these”, “those”, as well as the possessive adjectives like “my”, “your”, “his”, “our” etc. These also go in front.

Es un buen amigo. - He’s a really good friend.

Es de mal agüero. - It’s a bad omen. | Es de buen agüero. - It’s a good omen.

Es la Santa Sede. - It’s the Holy See. [A “See” in this sense means “seat”; the Vatican.]

Es la Santa Iglesia Católica. - It’s the Holy Catholic Church.

La gran meca del cine es Hollywood. - The great movie Mecca is Hollywood.

Es el gran y poderoso heroe. - It’s the great and mighty hero.

Es la última vez que te lo digo. - This is the last time I tell you.

El enero es el primer mes. - January is the first month.

Trabajamos en el noveno piso / la novena planta. - We work on the 9th floor/story.

Es el mejor jugador del equipo. - He’s the best player on the team.

Esta es la tercera vez. - This is the third time.

La peor decisión es la indecisión. - The worst decision is indecision.

2. Changes Meaning

The adjectives that change meaning are very few and more idiomatic. But they are also very common, so you’ll probably need to know them or at least have them in mind.

  • único/a - In front, único/a means “only”. 
    In back único/a means “one of a kind”, “unique” or when talking about siblings means “an only child”.
  • propio/a - In front, propio means “one’s own” as in “property”. 
    In back, propio/a means “appropriate” or “fits the occasion”.
  • gran / grande - In front, gran means “great”. 
    In back, grande means “large” as in size.
  • solo/a - In front, solo/a emphasizes “just one”. 
    In back, solo/a typically means “alone” or “lonely”.
  • nuevo/a - In front, nuevo/a means “recent” or something that “just came out”. 
    In the back, nuevo/ameans “newly made”.
  • antiguo/a - In front, antiguo/a means “ancient”, “outdated”, “obsolete” or “old-timey”. 
    In back, antiguo/a gets the meaning of “antique”.
  • viejo/a - In front, viejo/a means “long-time”. 
    In back, viejo/a means “old” as in age.
  • mismo/a - In front, mismo/a means “same”. 
    In the back, mismo means “self” as in “myself”, “himself”, “ourselves” etc.
  • pobre - In front, pobre means “pitiful” or “miserable”. 
    In the back, pobre refers to “poor” as in “no money”.
  • triste - In front, triste means “disastrous” or “disgraceful”. 
    In the back, triste means “sad” as in the emotion.
  • lejano/a - In front, lejano/a means “far-off” or “faraway”.
    In back, lejano/a means “distant” as in a relative or a physical location.

*****These aren’t all of them, but they’re some of the most common ones.

Es una chica única. - She’s a unique child.

Es hija única. - She’s an only child.

Es la única manera. - It’s the only way.

Es la única persona. - She’s the only person.

Es mi vestido propio. - It’s my appropriate dress. 

Es mi propio vestido. - It’s my own dress.

Es una gran mujer. - She’s a great wife.

Es una mujer grande. - She’s a big woman. 

Es la gran ciudad. - It’s the great city.

Es una ciudad grande. - It’s a big city.

Es un solo chico. - It’s just one boy. 

Es un chico solo. - It’s a lonely boy.

Es mi nuevo libro. - It’s my brand-new book.

Es nuestro libro nuevo. - It’s our newly made book. [Often used for books to mean “the latest edition”]

Ella sabe mucho sobre antigua Grecia. - She knows a lot about Ancient Greece.

Ella sabe mucho sobre los relojes antiguos. - She knows a lot about antique clocks.

Son viejos amigos de ella. - They’re long-time friends of hers.

Los amigos de ella son viejos. - The friends of hers are elderly.

Es la misma persona. - It’s the same person.

Ella misma no sabe por qué. - She herself doesn’t know why.

La pobre mujer no tiene nada. - The pitiful woman has nothing.

El hombre pobre no tiene nada. - The poor man has nothing.

Es un triste principio de la Navidad. - It’s a terrible start to Christmas.

Muchas personas tristes lloran. - Many sad people cry.

Había una vez en la lejana tierra de… - Once upon a time in the faraway land of…

Es un primo lejano. - He’s a distant cousin.