kurt cobain biopic

I don’t know about anyone else, but I’m crossing my fingers that Shelley Duvall plays me. Shelley Duvall in The Shining … That is my face, you cannot get any closer than that. I am probably the least manly dude that you have ever met in your life. So why not have Shelley Duvall play me?
—  dave grohl on who he wants to play him in the kurt cobain biopic
Music-focused cinema could provide something radical: a close view of the processes of composing and performing that reveals the work behind what seems, to listeners, like magic. Instead, like almost any other kind of cinema, it tends to focus on human relationships: on the interpersonal, not the inner personal. This understandable tendency has resulted in many great explorations of how musicians get along with each other, cope in the world, affect social change and build legacies. Yet it means that most music films (with a few exceptions) still sidestep what’s unique about music-making: the mix of obsessive practice and spontaneous experimentation; the balance between listening and self-expression; the sensual experience of living through the ears. Making music a character allows us as viewers to relate to these narratives, but it also simplifies something worth keeping complicated.