kunzelman

A has been published on GamersFTW

A has been published on GamersFTW - http://bit.ly/1R7EpiK - Platform(s) available: PC
Platform reviewed: PC
Have you ever played a game that’s left you thinking “what the hell did I just play?” Well Epanalepsis is a game that has left me scratching my head as I try to decipher what it is I’ve just experienced. Developer Cameron Kunzelman describes the gam… #PC, #Reviews

US says decade-old Gulf oil leak could last another century

WASHINGTON (AP) – For more than a decade, oil has been leaking into the Gulf of Mexico where a hurricane toppled a drilling company’s platform off the coast of Louisiana. Now the federal government is warning that the leak could last another century or more if left unchecked.

Government estimates obtained by The Associated Press provide new details about the scope of a leak that has persisted since Hurricane Ivan in 2004.

Taylor Energy Co., which owned the platform and a cluster of oil wells, has played down the extent and environmental impact of the leak. The company also maintains that nothing can be done to completely eliminate the chronic oil slicks that often stretch for miles off the Louisiana coast.

Taylor has tried to broker a deal with the government to resolve its financial obligations for the leak, but authorities have rebuffed those overtures and have ordered additional work by the company, according to Justice Department officials who were not authorized to comment by name and spoke on condition of anonymity.

“There is still more that can be done by Taylor to control and contain the oil that is discharging” from the site, says an Interior Department fact sheet obtained by the AP.

Federal regulators suspect oil is still leaking from at least one of 25 wells that remain buried under mounds of sediment from an underwater mudslide triggered by waves whipped up by Hurricane Ivan.

A Taylor contractor drilled new wells to intercept and plug nine wells deemed capable of leaking oil. But a company official has asserted that experts agree the “best course of action … is to not take any affirmative action” due to the risks of additional drilling.

An AP investigation last month revealed evidence that the leak is far worse than Taylor, or the government, has publicly reported during a secretive response to the slow-motion spill.

The AP’s review of more than 2,300 Coast Guard pollution reports since 2008 showed a dramatic spike in sheen sizes and oil volumes since Sept. 1, 2014. That reported increase came just after federal regulators held a workshop last August to improve the accuracy of Taylor’s slick estimates and started sending government observers on a Taylor contractor’s daily flights over the site.

Presented with AP’s findings, the Coast Guard provided a new leak estimate that is about 20 times greater than one recently touted by the company. In a February 2015 court filing, Taylor cited a year-old estimate that oil was leaking at a rate of less than 4 gallons per day.

A Coast Guard fact sheet says sheens as large as 1.5 miles wide and 14 miles long have been spotted since the workshop. Since last September, the estimated daily volume of oil discharged from the site has ranged from roughly 42 gallons to 2,329 gallons, with a daily average of more than 84 gallons.

Some experts have given far greater estimates of the leak’s extent. Based on satellite imagery and pollution reports, the watchdog group SkyTruth estimates between 300,000 and 1.4 million gallons have spilled from the site since 2004, with an annual average daily leak rate between 37 and 900 gallons.

Marylee Orr, executive director of the Louisiana Environmental Action Network, said Taylor must be held responsible for stopping the leak “even if it takes 100 years.”

“Every American citizen deserves to feel 100 percent confident that the response to this incident was rapid, effective and protective of the environment — and I don’t think we see that at this point,” said Orr, whose group is a plaintiff in a lawsuit filed against Taylor by the New York City-based Waterkeeper Alliance.

In 2008, Taylor set aside hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for leak-related work as part of a trust agreement with the Interior Department. The company says it has spent tens of millions of dollars on its efforts to contain and halt the leak, but it hasn’t publicly disclosed how much money is left in the trust. The company sold all its offshore leases and oil and gas interests in 2008, four years after founder Patrick Taylor died, and is down to only one full-time employee.

Justice Department officials say the company approached the government concerning the trust fund, but they declined to discuss the terms of its proposal. Federal agencies responded that more work was needed, including installing a more effective containment dome system, the officials said.

One official said the company’s proposed resolutions involved trying to recoup money that was still in the trust, but those overtures were rejected. Federal officials declined to comment on the status of any negotiations.

A spokesman for the company declined to comment Friday.

In response to AP’s investigation, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson last month called on federal officials to disclose technical data and other information about the leak. A spokesman for the Florida Democrat said Nelson had confirmed with the Interior Department that Taylor “was formally asking to be excused from any further cleanup costs.”

“This case illustrates how hurricanes and oil rigs don’t mix,” Nelson said in a statement. “And I’m going to keep doing everything I can to make sure the Interior Department holds this company accountable.”

____

Kunzelman reported from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Associated Press writer Alicia A. Caldwell in Washington contributed to this report.

Who is Speaking at IRDC?

Jim Shepard, Creator of Dungeonmans

Brian Bucklew, Freehold Games, Creator of Caves of Qud and Sproggiwood

Jeff Lait, Creator of POWDER, Vicious Orcs, and many more 7DRLs

Eben Howard, Creator of SquidLib, Assault Fish, and EmoSquid!

Bob Saunders, Creator of Approaching Infinity

Sheridan Rathbun, Creator of Barony

Jason Grinblat, Freehold Games, Creator of Caves of Qud and Sproggiwood

Cameron Kunzelman, Georgia State Graduate Student, Game Developer, and Critic

Adam Boyd, Moderator of /r/PixelDungeon and Roguelike Enthusiast

Jared Corduan, Roguelike Enthusiast

Rob Parker, University of Waterloo (Remote Talk)

Brett Gildersleeve, Creator of Rogue Space Marine

Lee Djavaherian, Creator of a Microcomputer Roguelike


Plus. a live recorded episode of Roguelike Radio

Amtrak CEO: Railroad takes 'full responsibility' for crash

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – As federal investigators try to find out why an Amtrak train that crashed in Philadelphia sped up in the last minute before it derailed, the railroad’s top official said it takes full responsibility for the deadly wreck.

Joseph Boardman, Amtrak president and CEO, said in a letter on Amtrak’s official blog Thursday that it is cooperating fully in an investigation into the accident that killed eight people and injured more than 200 this week.

“With truly heavy hearts, we mourn those who died. Their loss leaves holes in the lives of their families and communities,” Boardman wrote. “Amtrak takes full responsibility and deeply apologizes for our role in this tragic event.”

He said the railroad’s goal is “to fully understand what happened and how we can prevent a similar tragedy from occurring in the future.”

Meanwhile, the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday that in the last minute or so before the derailment, the Washington-to-New York train sped up from 70 mph until it reached more than 100 mph at a sharp bend where the maximum speed is supposed to be 50 mph.

Board member Robert Sumwalt said it’s unclear whether the speed was increased manually by engineer Brandon Bostian.

So far, investigators have found no problems with the track, the signals or the locomotive, and the train was running on time, Sumwalt said.

The last wrecked cars were pulled from the scene Friday and were being taken on flatbed trucks to an Amtrak facility in Delaware for further examination.

Bostian refused to talk to police Wednesday, authorities said. But on Thursday, Sumwalt said Bostian had agreed to be interviewed by the NTSB in the next few days.

Separately, the Philadelphia district attorney’s office said it is investigating and will decide whether to bring charges.

Bostian’s lawyer, Robert Goggin, told ABC News that his client suffered a concussion in the wreck, needed 15 staples in his head and has “absolutely no recollection whatsoever” of the crash. Goggin also said Bostian had not been using his cellphone, drinking or using drugs.

“He remembers coming into the curve. He remembers attempting to reduce speed and thereafter he was knocked out,” Goggin said. He said Bostian’s cellphone was off and stored in his bag before the accident, as required. Goggin said his client “cooperated fully” with police and told them “everything that he knew,” immediately consenting to a blood test and surrendering his cellphone.

As the death toll climbed Thursday with the discovery of what was believed to be the last body in one of the mangled railcars, Mayor Michael Nutter again appeared to cast blame on Bostian, questioning why the train was going so fast.

“I don’t think that any common sense, rational person would think that it was OK to travel at that level of speed knowing that there was a pretty significant restriction on how fast you could go through that turn,” Nutter said.

Bostian graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a bachelor’s degree in business administration and management in 2006. He became an Amtrak engineer in 2010, four years after landing a job as a conductor, according to his LinkedIn profile. He lives in New York City.

“I have nothing but good things to say about Brandon,” said Will Gust, who belonged to the Acacia fraternity with Bostian in college. “He is a very conscientious person, one of the most upstanding individuals that I know, just a really good quality person.”

Stefanie McGee, a friend of Bostian’s, is now city clerk in his hometown of Bartlett, Tennessee, a suburb of Memphis. She said he always wanted to be an engineer or a conductor.

“He would go on vacation and bring back subway maps,” she recalled Thursday. “He would go places with his family, and he would talk about the trains instead of the places.”

Officials believe they have now accounted for all 243 passengers and crew members who were thought to have been aboard, Nutter said. Forty-three remained hospitalized Thursday, according to the mayor. Temple University Hospital said Friday that it had six patients in critical condition, all of whom were expected to pull through.

The first funeral of the eight people killed in the crash was to be held Friday morning. Services for U.S. Naval Academy Midshipman Justin Zemser, 20, who was traveling home to New York City, will take place on Long Island.

Amtrak, meanwhile, said limited train service between Philadelphia and New York should resume Monday, with full service by Tuesday. Amtrak carries 11.6 million passengers a year along the Northeast Corridor, which runs between Washington and Boston.

___

Kunzelman reported from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Associated Press writers Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Missouri, Adrian Sainz in Memphis, Tennessee, and Jennifer Peltz in New York contributed to this story.

Investigators look at why train sped up before derailment

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – In the moment the Amtrak train that derailed at a curve this week was supposed to be slowing down, it was accelerating, investigators said Thursday.

How that came to happen has emerged as the central question surrounding the derailment, which killed eight people and sent more than 200 to hospitals Tuesday night in the nation’s deadliest train wreck in nearly six years.

In the minute or so before the crash, the train sped up from 70 mph until it reached more than 100 mph at a sharp bend where the maximum speed is supposed to be 50 mph, National Transportation Safety Board member Robert Sumwalt said. It’s unclear, Sumwalt said, whether the speed was increased manually by engineer Brandon Bostian, who grew up obsessed with trains.

Investigators have found no problems with the track, signals or locomotive. Sumwalt said the train, on a route from Washington to New York City, was on time as it left the station in Philadelphia a few minutes before the crash.

Investigators want to know why the train was going so fast. But Bostian refused to talk to police on Wednesday, authorities said. On Thursday, Sumwalt said Bostian had agreed to be interviewed by the NTSB and the meeting will take place in the next few days.

Separately, the Philadelphia district attorney’s office said it was investigating and will decide whether to bring charges. And an Amtrak dispatcher injured in the crash filed what’s apparently the first lawsuit stemming from it, blaming Amtrak and seeking at least $150,000 in damages, his lawyer said.

Amtrak, in a statement posted online by CEO Joseph Boardman, called the derailment “a terrible tragedy” and said it was cooperating fully with the NTSB and was responding with every resource it has available.

“Amtrak takes full responsibility and deeply apologizes for our role in this tragic event,” it said.

Bostian’s lawyer, Robert Goggin, told ABC News that his client suffered a concussion in the wreck, needed 15 staples in his head and has “absolutely no recollection” of the crash. Goggin also said Bostian, who lives in New York, had not been using his cellphone, drinking or using drugs.

As the death toll climbed on Thursday with the discovery of what was believed to be the last body in one of the mangled railcars, Mayor Michael Nutter again appeared to cast blame on Bostian, questioning why the train was going so fast.

“I don’t think that any commonsense, rational person would think that it was OK to travel at that level of speed knowing that there was a pretty significant restriction on how fast you could go through that turn,” Nutter said.

Officials believe they have accounted for all 243 passengers and crew members thought to have been aboard, Nutter said. Forty-three remained hospitalized Thursday, he said.

Amtrak, meanwhile, said limited train service between Philadelphia and New York should resume on Monday, with full service by Tuesday. Amtrak carries 11.6 million passengers a year along the Northeast Corridor, which runs between Washington and Boston.

Bostian was obsessed with trains while growing up, talked about them constantly and wanted to be an engineer or a conductor, friends said.

“He would go on vacation and bring back subway maps,” said Stefanie McGee, a friend from Tennessee. “He would go places with his family, and he would talk about the trains instead of the places.”

Bostian graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a bachelor’s in business administration and management in 2006. He became an Amtrak engineer in 2010, four years after landing a job as a conductor, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Old friends and college classmates described him in glowing terms.

“I have nothing but good things to say about Brandon,” said Will Gust, who belonged to the Acacia fraternity with Bostian in college. “He is a very conscientious person, one of the most upstanding individuals that I know, just a really good quality person.”

McGee, the friend who is now city clerk in Bostian’s hometown of Bartlett, a suburb of Memphis, said he “talked about trains constantly” while growing up and always wanted to be an engineer or a conductor.

Bostian met up with college friends a few years ago in New York and told them he was working on trains.

“Oh, yeah, he loved his job,” said Justin Scott, another fraternity member with Bostian.

On an online forum for train enthusiasts called trainorders.com, a user who signed at least two posts “Brandon Bostian” or simply “Brandon” commented on a wide range of industry issues, including safety. A couple of posts under the handle “bwb6df” lamented that railroads hadn’t been fast enough to adopt positive train control, GPS-guided technology that can prevent trains from going over the speed limit.

“They have had nearly a hundred years of opportunity to implement SOME sort of system to mitigate human error, but with a few notable exceptions have failed to do so,” the writer posted in 2011. The same user said in 2012: “It shouldn’t take an act of Congress to get industry to adopt common-sense safety systems on their own.”

It’s unclear whether the author of the posts was Bostian. In a message posted Wednesday, the site’s administrator refused to release any information, citing privacy reasons.

Amtrak has equipped most of its heavily used Northeast Corridor with positive train control, but it was not in operation along the section where the accident took place because it was still being tested, said Boardman, the CEO.

However, Boardman vowed on Thursday that the technology will be in operation along the entire Northeast Corridor by the end of 2015, the deadline set by Congress.

On Tuesday, the job Bostian loved so much had him operating Amtrak’s Train 188 from Washington to New York.

“He remembers coming into the curve,” said Goggin, his attorney. “He remembers attempting to reduce speed, and thereafter he was knocked out.”

But Goggin said the engineer doesn’t recall anything out of the ordinary and doesn’t remember applying the emergency brakes, as investigators say was done. He said Bostian’s cellphone was off and stored in his bag before the accident, as required.

Goggin said that his client “cooperated fully” with police and told them “everything that he knew,” immediately consenting to a blood test and surrendering his cellphone.

Within hours of the wreck, Bostian’s Facebook profile picture was changed to a black rectangle.

___

Kunzelman reported from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Associated Press writers Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Missouri, Adrian Sainz in Memphis, Tennessee, and Jennifer Peltz in New York contributed to this story.

Amtrak engineer was obsessed with trains as a teen

PHILADELPHIA (AP) – Brandon Bostian was obsessed with trains while growing up, talked about them constantly and wanted to be an engineer or a conductor.

“He would go on vacation and bring back subway maps,” Stefanie McGee, a friend from Tennessee, recalled Thursday. “He would go places with his family and he would talk about the trains instead of the places.”

Bostian’s teenage dreams would come true. But now, at 32, the Amtrak engineer finds himself at the very center of the investigation into the nation’s deadliest train wreck in nearly six years.

He was at the controls of a train that investigators say entered a sharp bend at 106 mph, or twice the speed limit. Eight people were killed and more than 200 injured in the derailment Tuesday night in an industrial section of Philadelphia.

In yet another curious turn in the investigation, Robert Sumwalt of the National Transportation Safety Board said Thursday that the train sped up in the last minute or so before the wreck, accelerating from 70 mph to over 100 mph.

He said it is not clear yet whether the speed was increased manually. So far, investigators have found no problems with the track, the signals or the locomotive, and the train was running on time, Sumwalt said.

Investigators want to know why the train was going so fast. But Bostian refused to talk to police on Wednesday, authorities said. On Thursday, Sumwalt said that Bostian had agreed to be interviewed by the NTSB and that the meeting will take place in the next few days.

Separately, the Philadelphia district attorney’s office said it is investigating and will decide whether to bring charges.

Bostian’s lawyer, Robert Goggin, told ABC News that his client suffered a concussion in the wreck, needed 15 staples in his head and has “absolutely no recollection whatsoever” of the crash. Goggin also said Bostian had not been using his cellphone, drinking or using drugs.

As the death toll climbed on Thursday with the discovery of what was believed to be the last body in one of the mangled railcars, Mayor Michael Nutter again appeared to cast blame on Bostian, questioning why the train was going so fast.

“I don’t think that any commonsense, rational person would think that it was OK to travel at that level of speed knowing that there was a pretty significant restriction on how fast you could go through that turn,” Nutter said.

Officials believe they have now accounted for all 243 passengers and crew members who were thought to have been aboard, Nutter said. Forty-three remained hospitalized Thursday, according to the mayor. Temple University Hospital said it had six patients in critical condition, all of whom were expected to pull through.

Amtrak, meanwhile, said limited train service between Philadelphia and New York should resume on Monday, with full service by Tuesday. Amtrak carries 11.6 million passengers a year along the Northeast Corridor, which runs between Washington and Boston.

Bostian graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia with a bachelor’s in business administration and management in 2006, the university said. He became an Amtrak engineer in 2010, four years after landing a job as a conductor, according to his LinkedIn profile. He lives in the Forest Hills section of Queens, in New York City.

Old friends and college classmates described him in glowing terms.

“I have nothing but good things to say about Brandon,” said Will Gust, who belonged to the Acacia fraternity with Bostian in college. “He is a very conscientious person, one of the most upstanding individuals that I know, just a really good quality person.”

McGee, the friend who is now city clerk in Bostian’s hometown of Bartlett, a suburb of Memphis, said he “talked about trains constantly” while growing up and always wanted to be an engineer or a conductor.

Bostian met up with college friends a few years ago in New York and told them he was working on trains.

“Oh yeah, he loved his job,” said Justin Scott, another fraternity member with Bostian.

On an online forum for train enthusiasts called trainorders.com, a user who signed at least two posts “Brandon Bostian” or simply “Brandon” commented on a wide range of industry issues, including safety. A couple of posts under the handle “bwb6df” lamented that railroads hadn’t been fast enough to adopt “positive train control,” GPS-guided technology that can prevent trains from going over the speed limit.

“They have had nearly a hundred years of opportunity to implement SOME sort of system to mitigate human error, but with a few notable exceptions have failed to do so,” the writer posted in 2011. The same user said in 2012: “It shouldn’t take an act of Congress to get industry to adopt common-sense safety systems on their own.”

It is unclear whether the author of the posts was, in fact, Bostian. In a message posted Wednesday, the site’s administrator refused to release any information, citing privacy reasons.

Amtrak has equipped most of its heavily used Northeast Corridor with positive train control, but it was not in operation along the section where the accident took place because it was still being tested, CEO Joseph Boardman said.

However, Boardman vowed on Thursday that the technology will be in operation along the entire Northeast Corridor by the end of 2015, the deadline set by Congress.

On Tuesday, the job Bostian loved so much had him operating Amtrak’s Train 188 from Washington to New York.

“He remembers coming into the curve. He remembers attempting to reduce speed and thereafter he was knocked out,” said Goggin, his attorney. But Goggin said the engineer does not recall anything out of the ordinary and does not remember applying the emergency brakes, as investigators say was done.

He said Bostian’s cellphone was off and stored in his bag before the accident, as required. Goggin said that his client “cooperated fully” with police and told them “everything that he knew,” immediately consenting to a blood test and surrendering his cellphone.

Within hours of the wreck, Bostian’s Facebook profile picture was changed to a black rectangle.

“I imagine he is holding onto this pretty heavily,” said Scott, his fraternity brother.

Friends who seemingly knew about his role in the crash before his name publicly surfaced rallied to his side online. A Facebook friend whose profile identifies him as an Amtrak engineer living in California assured Bostian “it could have been any one of us.”

___

Kunzelman reported from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Associated Press writers Heather Hollingsworth in Kansas City, Missouri, Adrian Sainz in Memphis, Tennessee, and Jennifer Peltz in New York contributed to this story.