kulindadromeus

10

American Museum of Natural History, Part 10: The Birds are Dinosaurs Exhibit, part 7: 

M A X I M U M   O V E R P O O F

To be completely honest, even though the Tianyulong had pronated hands, that was 100% made up for by the fact that this is the most fluffy thing I’ve ever seen

Like. They didn’t have to fluff it up that much. You can get away with less poof on Tianyulong, based on the fossil. But they went all out. They did not pull any punches. That thing is the Overfloofin. 

I’m kind of disappointed they didn’t mention Kulindadromeus (even though they had time to add in a bit on Yi qi, which was named after Kulinda was), since Kulindadromeus had clearer evidence that these were more likely to be protofeathers rather than just some non-homologous quill thing than Tianyulong had, but, still. 

MAXIMUM OVERPOOF

SO YOU KNOW WHAT YOU SHOULD BUY?

THE COLORING BOOK OF (SCIENTIFICALLY ACCURATE) DINOSAURS

IT IS SO GOOD

HERE ARE SOME OF MY COLORINGS SO FAR

EORAPTOR

MELANOROSAURUS

COELOPHYSIS

THERE’S FLUFF FAR AND WIDE

A DRAGON?!

THE POINTY BIRB

DUCK SATAN!!!!!

MODERN DINOSAURS ALONGSIDE EXTINCT ONES

KULINDADROMEUS?!?!?!?!?!?!?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

IT’S ONLY NINE USD EVERYONE BUY THIS BOOK BUY IT BUY IT BUY IT I DON’T EVEN KNOW THE AUTHOR BUT HOLY SHIT

Happy New Year, Happy Chanukah, and Happy Kwanzaa,

Meig (who is recovering from the flu)

I meant to fulfill more entries for @a-dinosaur-a-day’s Dinoween challenge, but I ended up being too busy – but I quickly whipped this up for the final day!

Included:
4. Dinosaurs eating ALL THE CANDY
15. Baby dinosaurs being adorably spoopy
17. Velociraptor with JP Raptor Masks
21. Compsognathus stealing candy
24. Pet dinosaurs dressed up in costumes by their humans
30. Yi qi drawn like a bat (in this case, a Honduran white bat)
34. Theropod dressed as a Spoopy Skeleton (poor Frat Boy!)
38. Accurate dinosaurs dressed as Inaccurate ones
40. Black cat Kulindadromeus

Featuring my characters Winifred (JP raptor), Frat Boy (JP Dilo), and Otulissa (top Compsognathus). Other three are random!

HAPPY DINOWEEN! 🎃🎃

Here’s to Kulindaday that @a-dinosaur-a-day has celebrated these past two years, so I thought I would join in and draw a group of Kulindadromeus in a tree eating the leaves, like modern day goats.

Kulindadromeus is probably the hardest dinosaur I’ve drawn- I’m no good at  Neornithischians, I’m more of a therapod, dromeosaur, slightly too birdy paleo-artist type of person

New dinosaur revealed for JW 5 : Fuck Feathers, Kulindadromeus will have knifes instead of feathers and will learn how to use a gun. All of their merchandise has been confirmed to be pink when asked why the marketing manager has this to say “Well this is a small herbivore with no claws or teeth or other weapons used to kill it’s prey obviously only a girl would want it,”

The internet is already complaining that it has knife feathers.

5

Non-binary Therizinosaur (“You can only be a herbivorous sauropod or a carnivorous theropod! That’s how it works.”), genderqueer Apatosaurus, asexual Quetzalcoatlus (”You’ve got to be attracted to someone” #batfacts), pansexual Utahraptor (THE MIGHTY GLOWRAPTOR), agender Dakosaurus and trans Kulindadromeus.

To all who see this, I apologize for my inferior floofing capabilities.

For @a-dinosaur-a-day‘s LGBT dinosaurs meme.

Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus

By José Carlos Cortés on @ryuukibart​, made for his project, The Liberal Dinosaur Fan! Check it out at @liberaldinosaurfan!

NameKulindadromeus zabaikalicus 

Name Meaning: Zabaikal Kulinda Runner 

First Described: 2014 

Described By: Godefroit et al. 

ClassificationDinosauria, Ornithischa, Genasauria, Neornithischia

When this dinosaur was discovered, it rapidly rose to the fourth position in my favorite list - and it’s obvious why. This dinosaur proves pretty clearly that feathers were synapomorphic for both Ornithischia and Saurischia (something I have been suggesting for years due to quills being found on another basal ornithischian, Tianyulong, as well as protofeathers found on Psittacosaurus, and the presence of feather protein genes in the crocodile genome, suggesting that protofeather-esque filaments are a trait of all of archosauria, based on cladistics. Genomes, man. Genomes.) It was found in the Ukureyskaya formation in Russia, which dates back to the middle to late Jurassic, about 169 to 144 million years ago in the Bajocian to Tithonian ages. It is known from a partial skeleton in rock that lead to amazing preservation of both feathers and scales. Now, this fossil was stolen and described as another species, Kulindapteryx, but this is not valid and should be ignored (curse you, BANDits.) 

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulindadromeus#mediaviewer/File:Kulindadromeus_by_Tom_Parker.png

Kulindadromeus was a bipedal runner, about 1.5 meters long, with a short head, short forelimbs, and long hindlimbs and tail. It had scales on the top of its tale and scales branching into feather like structures on the main part of the body. This fuzz all over the body are hair like filaments like stage 1 dino fuzz on Sinosauropteryx, and then another type is longer filaments on the upper arms and thighs like type three feathers, and then unique bundles of ribbon like structures on the upper lower legs that are made from parallel filaments. 

Source: ewilloughby

Kulindadromeus also had three types of scales: overlapping hexagonal scales on the lower shins, non-overlapping scales on the hands ankles and feet, and arched rectangular scales on the tail, forming rows. 

By Sam Stanton on @artisticthingem

According to the science of evolutionary cladistics, the closer two clades are related to one another, the more likely any features shared by those clades was only evolved once, in their last common ancestor. More deviated groups - such as birds and bats - that share a feature evolved them separately. As such, the fact that crocodiles have a dormant feather gene (same protein) implies that the last common ancestor of both crocodiles and birds had feathers - and that’s just from genomics. 


By myself (Meg Dickson) and John Turmelle on @killdeercheer

Now, while this feature may have been lost in many archosaurian species - as fur is lost in many species of mammals - it is important that we now, as paleontologists, switch our line of thought from “scaled until proven otherwise,” to “feathered until proven otherwise.” The discovery of so many feathered or quilled theropods - as well as quite a few quilled and feathered ornithischians, now - only bolsters that claim. This is by far one of the most exciting discoveries of modern paleontology, and I can’t wait to see what more we find out about the connection between dinosaurs, birds, and feathers in the coming years. 

Source: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kulindadromeus

Shout out goes to prehistoric-birds!

Also, the moral of today’s story is NEVER TRUST A BANDIT