kolman helmschmid

Exotic Helmets of the ages

Toothface helm by an unknown Italian artist from the 17th century 

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Frog-mouth helm (or Stechhelm) - It was used by mounted knights between the 14th and 17th centuries. 

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Bascinet from the 14th and 15th century 

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Sallet in the Shape of a Lion’s Head, c. 1475-1480 - The earliest surviving example of a Renaissance armor all'antica. The outer shell of the steel helmet was made of embossed and gilt copper. 

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An oil-painted sallet from Germany, c. 1500 - Worn by lower class men-at-arms. 

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Bird Man Helmet from the early 16th century 

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The Horned Helmet, Innsbruck, Austria, 1511-1514 

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Closed helmet with mask visor, by Kolman Helmschmid in Augsburg, Germany, c. 1515 - Grotesque human mask-like visors were really popular in Germany and Austria in the early 16th century. 

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Grotesque ones from the early 16th century 

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Dark Helmet - From a galaxy far, far away…(wait, how did this get in there!) 

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The Maximilian armour - These early 16th century German plate armours were first made for the Emperor Maximilian I. 

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Burgonet of Guidobaldo II della Rovere, Duke of Urbino, Milan, c. 1532-35 

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The ceremonial and parade helmets of Charles V - Desiderius Helmschmid, c. 1540 

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Desiderius Helmschmid, c. 1540 

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Filippo Negroli, 1533 

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Kolman Helmschmid, c. 1530 

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Filippo and Francesco Negroli, 1545 

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Filippo and Francesco Negroli, 1545 

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Burgonet with Falling Buffe and scenes of battle between the Lapiths and the Centaurs, c. 1555 - Probably made for Henry II of France, but passed as a gift to the Medicis. 

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Burgonet, created in a Venetian workshop in the late 1550s 

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Helmet in the form of a sea conch shell, 1618, Japan 

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A German or Italian Savoyard Helmet, c. 1620-1630 

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A French face-protecting expermiental helmet from the WWI, invented by Dr. Pollack, a medical officer - Based on the M15 Adrian helmet, used by the French Army during the war. 

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Close helmet from Augsburg 1530 

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1500 Burgonet 

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Filippo Negroli burgonet 1532-1535 

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Griffin-shaped Helmet Steel embossed and gilt and silvered italy (Milan or Brescia) about 1550. 

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Musée del armée 

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Burgonet-ja, cc 1530, Real Armería, Madrid 

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Burgonet for parade armor. Desiderius Helmschmid. German (Augsburg) about 1550-1555 CE 

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oops… 

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This shaffron forms part of an important garniture of armor for field and tournament use made for Nicolas “the Black” Radziwill (1515–1565) 

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Helmet Italian 1550 CE 

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A “Garde du Corps” troopers helmet, Germany 1900 

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Helmet in the Classical Style, French Paris probably about 1760-70 

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1529, by Hans Seusenhofer of Innsbruck, Austria, for King Ferdinand I (1503-1564). wolf faced visor 


Grotesque visor 1550 

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Grotesque helmet Innsbruck 1520 - 1530 


Musée de l'Armée 

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Mustached visored helmet 

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Wooden Ekoi mask helmet 

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19th century vintage grotesque helmet 

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Can anybody figure this one out? 

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Please feel free to elaborate on anything you see here. Post one of your own creations or simply add to the list of historical head pieces. I will try to add more information if I have time. 

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1)Filippo Negroli and Brothers, Italian, c. 1510–1579, Armor of Emperor Charles V, Milan, 1539, embossed and gold- and silver-damascened steel; brass and leather, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid.

Because of the decoration over the elbows, shoulders, and helmet, this armor is known as the “Mask Garniture.” (Garnitures are sets of armor with interchangeable parts that adapted the suit for use on horseback or on foot, in tournaments or on the battlefield.) It is the only suit of armor signed and dated by Filippo (in an inscription under the visor) and is thus considered the key work of the Negroli workshop. The exquisite damascening, a technique for inlaying the gold designs, is the work of Filippo’s talented seventeen-year-old brother, Francesco.

2)Philip II and the Royal Armory

The Royal Armory was created by Charles V’s son, Philip II, whose long reign as king of Spain lasted from 1556 to 1598. His wills stipulated that his collection could not be dispersed after his death, but should instead be handed down to his descendents. Philip’s great respect for his father and for the material and symbolic value of the emperor’s armor led him to purchase Charles’ collection, which had been slated for sale to pay off outstanding debts at the time of his death in 1558. Armor made for subsequent monarchs was later added to those two core collections.

Unlike arsenals, which keep weapons and armor to equip an army for battle, the Royal Armory includes trophies of war as well as armor received as diplomatic gifts or worn in pageants, parades, and tournaments. The process of decorating such armor, often by embossing or hammering the steel from the reverse to create designs in relief, weakened the metal. The armor is consequently more propagandistic than utilitarian, serving to impress viewers with its opulence and imagery extolling the wearer’s power, valor, and chivalry.

3)(left) Italian, 16th Century, Helmet (Burgonet) of Philip II, Milan, c. 1560–1565 embossed, gold- and silver-damascened steel, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid

(right) Kolman Helmschmid, German, c. 1470–1532, Helmet (Burgonet) of Emperor Charles V, Augsburg, c. 1530, etched, embossed, and gold-damascened steel; fabric and leather, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid.

4)Italian, 16th Century, Helmet (Burgonet) of Philip II, Northern Italy, c. 1560–1565, gold- and silver-damascened steel, fabric, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid.

Ancient wars were a popular subject for Renaissance parade armor, as on this shield and burgonet (an open-faced helmet) depicting scenes from the Trojan War. The left side of the helmet shows the Judgment of Paris, the Trojan prince who declared Aphrodite the most beautiful goddess after she promised him Helen, wife of the king of Sparta. On the right side, Trojans tear down part of their city walls to make way for the huge Trojan horse in which Greek warriors were hidden. Paris’ abduction of Helen and the Greeks’ departure for Troy appear in the center of the shield.

5)Filippo and Francesco Negroli, Italian, c. 1510–1579 and c. 1522–1600, Helmet (Burgonet) of Emperor Charles V, Milan, 1545,embossed and gold-damascened steel, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid.

This masterpiece of the Negroli workshop was made from a single sheet of steel that was hammered out from the underside in a technique known as embossing or repoussée (French for “pushed out”). A Turkish soldier with bound arms arches over the top of the helmet, while two female figures personifying Fame and Victory grasp his mustache. The scene symbolizes victory over Islam and Charles’ role as defender of the Christian faith. The inscription compares him to “Invincible Caesar.”

Portions of a Costume Armour (c. 1525) Kolman Helmschmid  (German, Augsburg, 1471–1532)
This armor reproduces in steel the extravagant puffed and slashed costume of the German Landsknechte (mercenary infantry troops). The matching pieces are preserved in the Musée de l'Armée, Paris. Coming from the Radziwill armory in Nesvizh in present-day Belarus, this armor may have been made for Jerzy Herkules Radziwill (1480–1541), a powerful Polish nobleman.

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Armor with a tonlet, or flaring skirt, was designed for combat on foot within an enclosed field, a tournament sport in which swordsmen were awarded points according to the quantity and location of the blows they dealt. Decorated with a hunting scene showing a bear, deer, and wild boar chased by hounds, this ensemble has been known as the “Hunt Tonlet” armor since the sixteenth century.

Kolman Helmschmid, German, c. 1470–1532, Armor of Emperor Charles V, Augsburg, c. 1525, etched and gilt steel, leather, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid

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Ancient wars were a popular subject for Renaissance parade armor, as on this shield and burgonet (an open-faced helmet) depicting scenes from the Trojan War. The left side of the helmet shows the Judgment of Paris, the Trojan prince who declared Aphrodite the most beautiful goddess after she promised him Helen, wife of the king of Sparta. On the right side, Trojans tear down part of their city walls to make way for the huge Trojan horse in which Greek warriors were hidden. Paris’ abduction of Helen and the Greeks’ departure for Troy appear in the center of the shield.

Italian, 16th Century, Helmet (Burgonet) of Philip II, Northern Italy, c. 1560–1565, gold- and silver-damascened steel, fabric, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid

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Close helmet with mask visor, ca. 1515
Attributed to Kolman Helmschmid (German, 1471–1532)
Augsburg, Germany
Steel, embossed, etched, and gilt

Metropolitan Museum of Art:

Helmets fitted with masklike visors were a popular German and Austrian fashion about 1510 to 1540. With their visors forged and embossed as humorous or grotesque human masks, such helmets were often worn in tournaments held during the exuberant pre-Lenten (Shrovetide) festivals, celebrations somewhat akin to the modern Mardi Gras. Substitute visors of more conventional type were often provided for everyday use.

Maximilian’s equestrian armor portraying feats of strength by Hercules and Samson, also presents him as the successor to heroes of antiquity.

Attributed to Kolman Helmschmid, German, 1470–1532, Equestrian Armor of Maximilian I, Augsburg, c. 1517–1518, openwork, embossed, etched, and gilt steel; fabric and leather, Patrimonio Nacional, Real Armería, Madrid