kiryuu touga

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I wanted to make one for the whole student council but idk couldn’t think of one for Saionji or Nanami but hey three out of the five isn’t bad LOL. Anyways, enjoy and happy new years!

(Miki’s is my favorite, I can’t stop laughing at it).

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少女革命ウテナ画集 The hard core of UTENA, 2013

Some thoughts about Touga in the series vs. the movie have been sitting in the back of my mind for a while. He’s not a character I see discussed a lot, so I don’t know if other people have wrote about this before or not.

I’ve seen a lot of people make a distinction about series!Touga and movie!Touga, and while everyone’s show and movie characters have obvious differences, I think at the core they are all the same people with the same basic issues. Touga, at first glance, seems to be the most different out of all of them. I think we’d all consider movie!Touga a better guy than series!Touga. He’s certainly more sympathetic, being dead and all. Movie!Touga doesn’t manipulate Utena or abuse Nanami, and he seems to be an all-around decent guy.

However, I think his story is the same in both continuities. In the series, he realizes he loves Utena, but his attempts to save her fail because the only thing he knows how to do is replicate the same patriarchal behaviors that he wants to save her from (ie, dominating her and making her his girlfriend). In the movie, he dies trying to rescue a girl from drowning. In both cases, it’s the expectations of masculinity, of “princely-ness,” that cause his downfall. Movie!Touga has to try and save the drowning damsel in distress, because that’s what princes do. Series!Touga replicates the abuse performed by his role model, because that’s presented to him as the way to manliness and power.

This isn’t to say we should sympathize with series!Touga the way we might with movie!Touga, but I think the similarities are important. They’re two sides of the same coin, and together are a strong argument for the ways in which masculinity and sexism hurt men.