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“I feel like everyone is against me, but no one ever makes fun of me, mainly because they think I am a psycho. There is one kid above all others that I want to kill. I want nothing more than to put a hole in his head. The one reason I don’t: hope. That tomorrow will be better. As soon as my hope is gone, people die” -An excerpt from Kip Kinkel’s journal

School/University Shooter Voices
School/University Shooter Voices

Audio recordings of various school or university shooters. Note: Elliot Rodger isn’t necessarily a school/university shooter, as his attack was only on the campus, and three of his victims were stabbed to death, not shot.  Still fits into the theme, in my opinion.

In chronological order: Kip Kinkel (1998) - Dylan Klebold (†1999) - Eric Harris (†1999) - Seung-hui Cho (†2007) - Pekka-Eric Auvinen (†2007) - TJ Lane (2012) - Adam Lanza (†2012) - Elliot Rodger (†2014) - Dylann Roof (2015)

A regular tumblr user, coming across the tcc: om,,g,,, g-guys, I found, ,,, rhe,,serial kil ller,, fandom, ,, they’re all,, murders and school sh,,,ooters

The TCC: lol look at this pic I made of Eric Harris in assless chaps

Kip Kinkel about his parents
Kip Kinkel about his parents

The interrogation of Kip Kinkel on May 21, 1998. I compiled the parts where he talks about his motive to murder his parents (William Kinkel and Faith Zuranski), his relationship to them and what he was feeling when he killed them. For a better understanding of this, he killed his father first, not in a fight, after the fight, when his father was in the kitchen drinking something. When his mother came home, he killed her too. The next day, he shot up his high school.

- Detective: Okay….So was your dad…Did he hit you or anything like that?
Kip Kinkel: No.
Detective: Okay…Was he yelling or out of control or?
Kip Kinkel: I couldn’t, I couldn’t, I had no other choice. God.

- Kip Kinkel: I loved my dad that’s why I had to
Detective: You love him, so that’s why you had to kill him?
Kip Kinkel: Yes.

- Kip Kinkel: Oh my God, my parents were good people, I’m just so fucked up in the head, I don’t know why.

- Detective: Do you say anything to her? 
Kip Kinkel: Yes, I told her I loved her.
Detective: And then you shot her. 
Kip Kinkel: Yes. God damn it, these voices inside my head.

- Kip Kinkel: She was still alive and I said that I loved her and I shot her…I shot her again, so she wouldn’t know that I killed her. I loved my mom.

- Detective: Now you shot your mom to save her the embarrassment and that sort of stuff, right?
Kip Kinkel: Yes.
Detective: Okay. Was that the right thing or the wrong thing to do?
Kip Kinkel: I couldn’t do anything else.

- Kip Kinkel: My dad kept saying how my mom…how embarrassed she was going to be and how horrible I was and I couldn’t let my mom feel like that. I couldn’t do anything else. There’s no other way.

Dr. William Sack on Kip Kinkel
In his psychological evaluation of 15 year old mass shooter Kip Kinkel, Dr. William Sack cited paranoid schizophrenia as a psychological disorder that Kinkel suffered from, as well as a contributive factor to his crimes. He noted that Kinkel also experienced prominent symptoms of depression that often worsened his schizophrenic psychosis as they arose.
Kinkel had evidently been hearing voices consistently since he was twelve years old. He told Dr. Sack that there were 3 different male voices that he heard regularly. One that would insult and berate him, another that encouraged him to kill, and a third that would repeat or respond to the other two voices. Along with his hallucinations, Kip Kinkel also developed delusions that were paranoid in nature. Dr. Sack recorded a total of five main delusions that he observed in Kinkel, all of which made him paranoid. The most noteable delusion was his belief that there was a chip implanted in his brain. This delusion derived from an attempted rationalization of the voices that he’d been hearing since age 12.
Dr. Sack concluded that Kip Kinkel’s schizophrenic tendencies directly influenced his crimes. He felt that the buildup of stress and the development of the psychosis had overwhelmed Kinkel’s self control.
After being convicted of the murder of his parents and those killed in the mass shooting, along with attempted murder of those injured, Kinkel was sentenced to 111 years without parole. He was put on atypical antipsychotics and antidepressants including Olanzapine. Dr. Sack reported a positive response to the medication on his visit ten days into treatment, as Kinkel told him the voices became much less aggressive and persistent.