kingdom of dahomey

Hoodoo- Also called Rootwork. An African-based system of healing and magick primarily using roots and herbs.

Rootworker- A person skilled in the use of herbs and roots to cure illness or cast spells.

Voodoo- A religion that originated in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey (present day Benin) in West Africa and transported to the Caribbean and the Americas by African slaves. The proper name for this religion is Vodun, Which means “Spirit” or “God” in the language of the Ewe/Fon tribe.” 

- McQuillar, T. L. (n.d.). Rootwork: Using the folk magic of Black America for Love, Money, and success.

Fight Like a Girl

Anhotep I, Ancient Egyptian Warrior Princess, Hyksos War, “cleansed Egypt of the Hyksos”.

Queen Boudicca, led the Iceni Rebellion against Rome, 1st century.

Relief of two Roman gladiatrices found at Halicarnassus, Roman Empire

Hua Mulan, Tang Dynasty China, disguised herself as a man to fight in her father’s stead.  Inspired the Disney movie “Mulan”.

The Trung Sisters, 1st Century Vietnam, rebelled against the Chinese Empire.

Joan of Arc, the Hundred Years War. Led the French to victory against the English.

Tomoe Gozen, 12th-13th century Samurai.  The woodblock print below depicts her beheading the Samurai Moroshige of Musashi at the Battle of Awazu.

Matilda of Tuscany, Middle Ages, Investiture Conflict, personal bodyguard of the Pope.

The Isabella de Carazzi and Diambra de Pettinella Duel, circa 1552.

Julie d'Aubigny, 17th century swordsmen and opera singer. Considered one of the greatest duelists in history.

Mary Read and Anne Bonney, 17th/18th century pirates.

Elizabeth “Lady Bare Knuckles Stokes, popular bareknuckle boxer in Britain, early 18th century. Fought both men and women, was also noted for her skill with the broadsword and cudgel.

Hannah Snell, Royal Marine, Seven Years War, disguised herself as a man.

Deborah Sampson, American Revolution, disguised herself as a man. Removed a musket ball from her thigh with a knife.

The “Petticoat Duel” between Almeria Braddock and Mrs. Elphinstone, circa 1792.

Nadezhda Andreyevna Durova,  most heavily decorated soldier in the Russian Cavalry during the Napoleonic Wars.

Pine Leaf, Crow Nation War Chief, 19th century

Harriet Tubman, American Civil War, spy, army scout, and co-commander of Union forces during the Combahee River Raid.

Loretta Valsaquez, American Civil War, Confederacy. Disguised herself as a man.

Frances Lousia Clayton, disguised herself as a man to fight with her husband, Union Army, American Civil War.

Cathay Williams, 38th Infantry (Buffalo Soldiers) during the late 19th century. Disguised herself as a man.

“Stagecoach” Mary Fields, Old West icon, once shot a man in the bum in a gunfight after he called her a nigger.

The Dahomey Amazon’s, West Africa 19th century.  The most feared warriors of the Kingdom of Dahomey.  Their favorite pastime was to decapitate their captured enemies.

Princess Pauline Metternich and Countess Kielmannsegg Duel of 1892

One of many “Soldateras” during the Mexican Revolution

Captain Flora Sandes, World War I, English woman who fought in the Serbian Army.  Won the Serbia’s highest honor (the Order of the Karađorđe’s Star) after leading her company on a successful assault despite being wounded by a grenade and in a bout of hand to hand combat.

Edith Gerrud, the Jiu Jitsu Suffragist

Spanish Civil War.

Lydia Litvyak, Soviet Air Force, World War II: First female fighter ace, first kill scored by a woman, highest scoring female fighter pilot with 16 kills. Heroine of the Soviet Union.

Nancy Wake, World War II, commanded a 7,000 man resistance group in France. Was tortured by the Gestapo for 4 days and never talked.  On the flip side she was known for interrogating enemy spies and getting them to talk, then executing them.

The 46th Taman Guards Night Bomber Group, a Soviet all female bomber group during World War II.  Nicknamed “The Night Witches” by the Germans because of their stealthy bombing tactics.

Partisan Fighter, World War II

Lyudmilla Pavlichenko, Soviet Sniper during World War II, deadliest female sniper with 309 kills. Heroine of the Soviet Union.

Mariya Oktyabrskaya, Soviet tank driver during World War II, Heroine of the Soviet Union.

Capt. Kim Campbell, US Air Force, A10 Warthog pilot during the Iraq War, the pictures speak for themselves.

Rukhsana Kausar, defended her family from a band of terrorists with an axe and a captured assault rifle.

6

From 1625 to 1900, 12 kings succeeded one another at the head of the powerful Kingdom of Abomey. (You might know it as the Kingdom of Dahomey.) Each king, upon ascension, built himself a new palace to demonstrate his power and magnificence. Each one was constructed in a similar style with the same materials. Spread out over 99 acres, the palaces are decorated with bas-reliefs which document the accomplishments and events during the reign of each king.With the exception of King Akaba, who had his own separate enclosure, they all had their palaces built within the same walled area.  The Royal Palaces of Abomey is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Benin. 

2

The Adopted Goddaughter of Queen Victoria: Sara Forbes Bonetta 

Sara was originally named Aina and was born in 1843 into the West African Egbado clan. When she was a young child, Sara’s village was raided by soldiers from the kingdom of Dahomey. After both of her parents were killed in the raid, the five-year-old Sara was captured as a slave and was possibly intended as a human sacrifice. But Captain Frederick Forbes of the Royal Navy took notice of the little girl and persuaded King Gehzo of the Dahomey to offer Sara as a gift to the English Queen Victoria.It was then that she was given her name of Sara Forbes Bonetta. Forbes, the last name of the Captain; and Bonetta, the name of the Captain’s ship. 

Queen Victoria was delighted by Sara and found her very intelligent. It was at this time that Victoria adopted Sara as her goddaughter and arranged for her to be comfortably brought up in the British middle class. Although Sara was sent to school in Africa for a short while, she grew homesick and returned to finish her education in England. In 1862, she was present at the wedding of Victoria’s daughter Alice. In the same year, Sara married James Pinson Labulo Davies, an African merchant and businessman. 

Sara and Davies returned to Africa, specifically to Lagos,Nigeria, where they would have three children. In 1880, Sara died of tuberculosis on the island of Madeira. A monument was erected to Sara in Lagos by her husband after her death. Today, her descendants still live in Nigeria, Sierra Leone, and England.


When one brings up muslim slavery to liberals/SJW’s, they often act as if it’s a cop out, and that the trans-atlantic slave trade being about race makes it so much worse. While it’s true the muslim slave trade wasn’t racialized to the extent the trans-atlantic slave trade was, it’s utterly false to say race never played a role, since you’d be hard pressed to find muslim thinkers and explorers who said very derogatory things about whites and blacks, and even espoused arab supremacy. All of these existed in the muslim world throughout it’s history, and still do. This also ignores that the trans-atlantic slave trade wasn’t always about race, especially early on, and that various african states europeans traded with were respected and even christianized. And this isn’t even getting into how much they sanitize african slavery, or exempt africans from blame in trading slaves (for a particularly extreme case, look up the kingdom of Dahomey and King Guezo.)

Besides all that, when you look at just how horribly slaves were treated in the muslim world, it actually says something worse about them, in that they acted like this without an extensive racial pretext. Male slaves were often castrated, which is why in spite all of the centuries of slavery in europe and africa, there’s so few local white and black communities in the middle east. It might be said that they would have done even worse if they racialized slavery on a widespread level. Slaves being treated as expendable and less than human has been typical throughout human history, yet liberals/SJW’s act like the racialization of slavery on the part of europeans was a whole different level of evil that nothing else in human history can simply compare to. They ignore the atrocities of the muslim world and their racism, they ignore the complexities of the trans-atlantic slave trade, they ignore the internal conflicts and debates throughout Europe and the Americas on the nature of slavery (which were unique in human history), they ignore (or excuse, or shift blame in regards to the trans-atlantic trade) the role of africans themselves in both slave trades, and they even ignore the other destinations of slaves in the trans-atlantic trade and focus overwhelmingly on America, which saw among the fewest slaves and ultimately had one of the least brutal forms of slavery. They pay no real attention to any other historical context or the actual conditions of different forms of slavery in question- the fact the atlantic trade was (eventually) about race is all that really matters to them.

The obsession with the trans-atlantic slave trade is one of the most powerful propaganda tools liberals have ever mustered (that, and sanitizing islam and the history of the muslim world). They’ve so deeply bastardized and twisted so much of basic human history in so many people’s minds, that the idea africans share much of the blame in the slave trade, or that white people were extensively enslaved by non-europeans (and that large parts of europe were conquered, exploited and colonized for centuries) is alien to many.

anonymous asked:

What your opinion on Women in the Military?

If a woman can meet the standards then I don’t see why not.  Today pretty much every modern military in the world allows women in combat.  The thing that gets me is that many people treat the subject like it’s something new and groundbreaking, like its never been done before. However, throughout history there have been many women who fought and did battle, many of whom were absolute badasses who make UFC heavy weight champions seem like wimpy wet noodles.

Anhotep I, Ancient Egypt, Hyksos War, “cleansed Egypt of the Hyksos”.

Hua Mulan, Tang Dynasty China, disguised herself as a man.  Inspired the Disney movie “Mulan”.

The Trung Sisters, 1st Century Vietnam, rebelled against the Chinese Empire.

Joan of Arc, the Hundred Years War. Led the French to victory against the English.

External image

Tomoe Gozen, lady Samurai during the Genpei War.  The woodblock illustration below is of her decapitating the Samurai Honda no Moroshige of Musashi during the Battle of Awazu.

External image

Matilda of Tuscany, Middle Ages, Investiture Conflict, personal bodyguard of the Pope.

External image

Hannah Snell, Royal Marine, Seven Years War, disguised herself as a man.

External image

Nadezhda Andreyevna Durova,  most heavily decorated soldier in the Russian Cavalry during the Napoleonic Wars. Disguised herself as a man.

External image

Deborah Sampson, American Revolution, disguised herself as a man. Removed a musket ball from her thigh with a knife.

External image

Harriet Tubman, American Civil War, spy, army scout, and co-commander of Union forces during the Combahee River Raid.

External image

Loretta Valsaquez, American Civil War, Confederacy. Disguised herself as a man.

External image

Cathay Williams, 38th Infantry (Buffalo Soldiers) during the late 19th century. Disguised herself as a man.

External image

The Dahomey Amazon’s, West Africa 19th century.  The most feared warriors of the Kingdom of Dahomey.  Their favorite pastime was to decapitate their captured enemies.

External image

One of many “Soldateras” during the Mexican Revolution.

External image

Captain Flora Sandes, World War I, English woman who fought in the Serbian Army.  Won the Serbia’s highest honor (the Order of the Karađorđe’s Star) after leading her company on a successful assault despite being wounded by a grenade and in a bout of hand to hand combat.

External image

Soldiers during the Spanish Civil War.

External image

Lydia Litvyak, Soviet Air Force, World War II: First female fighter ace, first kill scored by a woman, highest scoring female fighter pilot with 16 kills. Heroine of the Soviet Union.

External image

Nancy Wake, World War II, commanded a 7,000 man resistance group in France. Was tortured by the Gestapo for 4 days and never talked.  On the flip side she was known for interrogating enemy spies and getting them to talk, then executing them.

External image

The 46th Taman Guards Night Bomber Group, a Soviet all female bomber group during World War II.  Nicknamed “The Night Witches” by the Germans because of their stealthy bombing tactics.

External image

Lyudmilla Pavlichenko, Soviet Sniper during World War II, deadliest female sniper with 309 kills. Heroine of the Soviet Union.

External image

Mariya Oktyabrskaya, Soviet tank driver during World War II, Heroine of the Soviet Union.

External image

Capt. Kim Campbell, US Air Force, A10 Warthog pilot during the Iraq War, the pictures speak for themselves.

External image

External image

External image

External image

External image