king tutankhamun

Research shows that that these characteristics ran in the family, and that Tutankhamun’s parents were definitely siblings. (In ancient Egypt it was believed that incest kept the bloodline pure.) He also may have suffered from inherited temporal lobe epilepsy, which could be why he and his relatives were known for having religious visions. Source

Thirteen bracelets were found on the forearms of the mummy of King Tutankhamun. Seven on the right arm, and six on the left. Several of the bracelets included scarabs separated by motifs such as uraei and ankhs some have a large amuletic udjat eye or another central element. The bracelets were made of gold, multi coloured glass, faïence, and semiprecious stones. (MMA Burton photo TAA1382)

King Tut's Blade Made of Meteorite

King Tut was buried with a dagger made of an iron that literally came from space, says a new study into the composition of the iron blade from the sarcophagus of the boy king.

Using non-invasive, portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, a team of Italian and Egyptian researchers confirmed that the iron of the dagger placed on the right thigh of King Tut’s mummified body has meteoric origin.

The team, which include researchers from Milan Polytechnic, Pisa University and the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, detailed their results in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science.

The weapon, now on display at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, was described in 1925 by Howard Carter, who three years before had discovered the treasure-packed tomb, as “a highly ornamented gold dagger with crystal knob.” Read more.

abc.net.au
King Tutankhamun buried with dagger made of space iron
King Tutankhamun, the boy king of Egypt, was buried with a dagger made of iron from space.

King Tutankhamun, the boy king of Egypt, was buried with a dagger made of iron from space, a new study has found.

The weapon, placed on the right thigh of the mummified body, came from iron of meteoric origins, a team of Italian and Egyptians researchers has confirmed.

The team used a non-invasive X-ray technique to confirm the composition of the iron without damaging it, according to the study published in the journal of Meteoritics and Planetary Science.

“Meteoritic iron is clearly indicated by the presence of a high percentage of nickel,” the study’s main author Daniela Comelli told Discovery News.

Iron meteorites are mostly made of iron and nickel, with small quantities of cobalt, phosphorus, sulfur and carbon.

Artefacts produced with iron ore quarrying will show 4 per cent nickel at most, however the dagger found in the tomb was composed of nearly 11 per cent nickel.

The cobalt traces found in the iron dagger further confirmed the meteoric origin, Associate Professor Comelli said.

“The nickel and cobalt ratio in the dagger blade is consistent with that of iron meteorites that have preserved the primitive chondritic ratio during planetary differentiation in the early solar system,” she said.

Continue Reading.

Thirteen bracelets were found on the forearms of the mummy of King Tutankhamun. Seven on the right arm, and six on the left. Several of the bracelets included scarabs separated by motifs such as uraei and ankhs some have a large amuletic udjat eye or another central element. The bracelets were made of gold, multi coloured glass, faïence, and semiprecious stones. (MMA Burton photo TAA1382)