king r

In King Lear (III:vii) there is a man who is such a minor character that Shakespeare has not given him even a name: he is merely “First Servant.” All the characters around him – Regan, Cornwall, and Edmund – have fine long-term plans. They think they know how the story is going to end, and they are quite wrong. The servant has no such delusions. He has no notion of how the play is going to go. But he understands the present scene. He sees an abomination (the blinding of old Gloucester) taking place. He will not stand it.

His sword is out and pointed at his master’s breast in a moment: then Regan stabs him dead from behind. That is his whole part: eight lines all told. But if it were real life and not a play, that is the part it would be best to have acted.

—  – C.S. Lewis, “The World’s Last Night”

The Heirs of Winterfell 

This started as a series of quick sketches while listening to an audiobook late one night. I’ve been trying to establish a cohesive look for each of the Seven Kingdoms and have been having a difficult time coming up with things that I like. This was me toying around with some viking inspired looks. 

PASS IT ON

OUR FANDOM
WILL NEVER
DIE

6

“Robert wanted to be loved. My brother Tyrion has the same disease. Do you want to be loved, Sansa?”
“Everyone wants to be loved.”
“I see flowering hasn’t made you any brighter,” said Cersei. “Sansa, permit me to share a bit of womanly wisdom with you on this very special day. 

Love is poison. A sweet poison, yes, but it will kill you all the same.

George R. R. Martin, A Clash of Kings.

9

moodboard: brienne of tarth

“Fighting is better than this waiting. You don’t feel so helpless when you fight. You have a sword and a horse, sometimes an axe. When you’re armored it’s hard for anyone to hurt you.”