king park quote

[The Foxes are standing in the foyer, staring at Kevin’s broken racquet]

Kevin: So. Who snapped my racquet? I’m not mad. I just want to know.

Renee: I did. I broke it.

Kevin: No. No, you didn’t. Nicky?

Nicky: Don’t look at me, look at Dan!

Dan: What?! I didn’t break it.

Nicky: Huh. That’s weird. How did you even know it was broken?

Dan: Because it’s on the table in front of us and it’s broken!

Nicky: Suspicious.

Dan: No, it’s not!

Matt: If it matters, probably not… Andrew was the last one to leave the court yesterday.

Andrew: Liar! I didn’t even go on the court last night!

Matt: Oh really? Then what were you doing?

Andrew: I try and sleep while Kevin and Neil have extra practice. Everyone knows that, Matt!

Renee: Alright, let’s not fight. I broke it, let me fix it, Kevin.

Kevin: No. Who broke it?

Aaron: Kevin, Neil’s been awfully quiet…

Neil: Really?!

Aaron: Yeah, really!

[off to the side] Kevin: I broke it. Last night, I failed one of my drills so I snapped it in half. I predict ten minutes from now, they’ll be at each other’s throats with warpaint on their faces and a pig head on a stick. Good. It was getting a little chummy around here.

2

December 1st 1955: Rosa Parks on the bus

On this day in 1955, Rosa Parks, a 42-year-old black seamstress from Alabama, refused to give up her seat on a bus for a white man. A member of the NAACP, Parks was returning home from a long day at work when the bus driver ordered her to give up her seat on the full bus for a white man. No stranger to civil rights activism, she was subsequently arrested for civil disobedience in defying the state’s Jim Crow racial segregation laws. Through this act of defiance, Parks sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott, during which time African-Americans - under the leadership of a young, charismatic reverend called Martin Luther King Jr. - refused to use the city buses, arguing that they should be integrated per the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision. The boycott was successful in forcing Montgomery to end its discriminatory segregation laws, and marked the beginning of the main phase of what is now known as the Civil Rights Movement. From Montgomery, African-Americans across the United States went on to lead sit-ins, freedom rides, and political marches, in an attempt to bring an end to segregation laws which had oppressed their community for so long. These activists were all indebted to Rosa Parks - known as the ‘mother of the Civil Rights Movement’ - for her simple act of defiance, firmly asserting her humanity and her rights as an American citizen. As the movement grew, Parks remained an influential symbol and leader of the movement, which ultimately brought an end to legal segregation and forced Congress to pass the 1964 Civil Rights and 1965 Voting Rights Acts. As for Parks herself, the affair of her arrest and the subsequent boycott caused her to lose her job and made her a victim of harassment and threats. She moved to Detriot and in 1965 began to work in the office of Congressman John Conyers. In 1999, Rosa Parks was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal for her role in transforming American race relations, and upon her death in 2005 she lay in state at the U.S. Capitol. Today, 60 years on, we remember Rosa Parks’s personal bravery, the successes of the movement she inspired, and the steps yet to be taken as the struggle against systemic racism continues.

“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true. I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day…No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in”

60 years ago today

  • King Beast: What’s the situation here?
  • Ben: This is my girlfriend Mal, and this is Mal’s girlfriend Evie…Mal is gay, but she’s straight for me, and she’s gay for Evie, and Evie’s really gay for Mal. And I hate Evie.
  • Mal: It’s not that complicated.
  • King Beast: Oh. Yeah. Sure.