king frederik viii

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Representatives at the coronation of Nicholas II, Emperor of Russia

1) Representatives of Bavaria: They are arranged in a group with four seated and three standing behind them. Prince Louis of Bavaria (1845-1921), later King Ludwig III, is sitting at the centre of the group holding a hat with a feather plume on his lap. They are all wearing ceremonial military uniform and are holding swords.

2) Representatives of the Grand Duchy of Baden: They are arranged in a group with four seated and two standing behind them to the left. They are wearing ceremonial military uniform and are holding swords.

3) Representatives of Denmark: They are arranged in a group with three seated and three standing behind them. Crown Prince Frederik, later King Frederik VIII (1843-1912) is sitting at the centre of the group facing partly to the right. They are all wearing ceremonial military uniform.

4) Representatives of the Grand Duchy of Hesse and by Rhine: There are ten men arranged in a group with four seated and six standing in a row behind them. Ernst Ludwig, Grand Duke of Hesse and by Rhine (1868-1937) is sitting second from the left. All are wearing ceremonial military uniform or formal dress.

5) Representatives of France: They are standing in a group on a stone staircase with an open door behind them. All are wearing ceremonial military uniform.

6) Representatives of Romania: They are arranged in a group with Prince Ferdinand of Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen (1865-1927), later King Ferdinand I of Romania, sitting at the centre. All are wearing ceremonial military uniform.

7) Representatives of the United States of America: They are arranged in a group with three women at the centre wearing formal dresses. General McCook, the military envoy, is standing to the far left and there are two men to the far right. All are wearing ceremonial military uniform.

8) Representatives of the United States of America: Clifton Rodes Breckinridge (1846-1932), the Minister to Russia, is seated in the middle of the group. His wife is sitting beside him to the left and Mrs Peirce is sitting to the right. Five men are standing in a row behind them with Admiral Selfridge (1836-1924), the naval envoy, standing second from the right wearing naval uniform.

9) Representatives of the Netherlands: Seated at the centre of the group is a woman wearing a formal dress with a young girl standing beside her to the left. There is a man seated to the left and two men seated to the right. Six men are standing in a row behind. All of the men are wearing ceremonial military dress.

10) Representatives of Japan: There are nine men arranged in a group with five seated and four standing behind. Yamagata Aritomo (1838-1922), the Ambassador Extrodinary, is sitting at the centre of the group. All are wearing ceremonial military uniform or formal dress.

11) Representatives of Turkey: There are six men arranged in a group with four seated and two standing. Mr Zia-Pascha, the Ambassador Extrodinary, is sitting second from the right. They are all wearing military uniform or formal dress and several are wearing a fez.

12) Representatives of China: There are twenty-two men standing in a group with Li-Hung-Tchang (1823-1901), the Ambassador Extraordinary, seated at the front of the group to the right. They are wearing a mix of traditional Chinese costume and western military uniforms.

13) Representatives of Siam: Prince Shira of Siam is sitting to the left with a small table in front of him. There are two attendants beside him to the right, one seated and one standing. They are all wearing ceremonial military uniform. 

14) Representatives of Württemberg: There are five men arranged in a group with three seated and two standing behind. Albrecht, Duke of Württemberg (1865-1939) is sitting at the centre of the group. They are all wearing ceremonial military uniform. 

15) Representatives of Mexico: Don Manuel Iturbe, the Envoy Extraordinary, is sitting to the left wearing a heavily embroidered jacket and a sash. Two men are standing to the right, also wearing formal dress.

16) Representatives of the Emirate of Bukhara: There are six men arranged in a group with five sitting in a row and one standing behind. Emir Seid-Abdoul-Akhad-Khan (1859-1911) is sitting at the centre of the group. They are all wearing traditional costume or military uniform.

17) Representatives of the nobility: There is a large group of men gathered in front of a stone building which has three arches supported by columns, a balcony and windows in the gothic style. All are wearing military uniform. 

18) The suite of Nicholas II: There are sixty-five men arranged in a long group with the front row seated. All are wearing ceremonial military uniform and many are carrying swords.

19) Correspondents and artists

European Heritage is Monarchy, not Democracy

Various European monarchs prior to WWI:

Standing, from left to right: King Haakan VII of Norway, King Ferdinand of Bulgaria, King Manoel of Portugal, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, King George I of Greece, King Albert of the Belgians. Seated, from left to right: King Alfonso XIII of Spain, King George V of England, King Frederik VIII of Denmark.

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♕  My Favourite TiarasPrincess Dagmar’s Floral Tiara

This tiara belonged to Princess Dagmar of Denmark, the daughter of King Frederik VIII. The tiara returned to the main royal family at her death, because, despite the fact that she and her husband had children, she choose to leave the tiara to King Frederik IV, her nephew. King Frederik gave the tiara to his daughter, Margrethe. Queen Margrethe didn’t use it that much and she even loaned it, once, to her mother in law, Renee. In 2008, she loaned this piece to Marie Cavallier, the second wife of her son, Prince Joaquim. Marie wore the tiara, for the first time, on her wedding day and has used it since then. This piece it’s the only tiara from the royal family that Princess Marie has access to.

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The Pearl Poiré Tiara

The Pearl Poiré Tiara was commissioned by King Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia around 1825. It was a wedding gift for his daughter Louise who was marrying Prince Frederik of the Netherlands. It is made with a framework of diamond arches with 18 large poiré (drop) pearls suspended from the arches. 

Princess Louise left the tiara to her daughter, Queen Louise of Sweden and Norway (1828-1871). She passed it on to her daughter, again named Louise (1851-1926), who married King Frederik VIII of Denmark in 1869. Queen Louise received some other pearl and diamond pieces as wedding presents that worked so well with the Poiré Tiara that they became an assembled parure. She received a demi-parure, consisting of an impressive necklace, brooch, and earrings, from the Khedive of Kgypt, and a brooch from her grandmother. 

When Queen Louise died in 1926 she left the assembled parure to the Danish Royal Property Trust. The trust guarantees that the pieces pass from monarch to monarch, and cannot be sold or given away. In essence they are state property for the sole use of the Queen, with a few exceptions. Currently Queen Margrethe uses the Pearl Parure as her “big gun”. Using them for events like the New Years Banquet, Coronations, and Jubilee’s. 

The Wedding of Princess Fedora of Denmark with her cousin Prince Christian of Schaumburg-Lippe. September 9, 1937

Fedora was grandaughter of King Frederik VIII of Denmark through her father, Prince Harald of Denmark and also, niece of Kaiserin Augusta Viktoria of Prussia through her mother, Helena Adelheid, who was daughter of Caroline Mathilde of Schleswig-Holstein.

Christian was son of the tragic Princess Louise of Denmark , eldest daughter of King Frederik VIII

(Curious note that Christian , before Fedora, was shortly engaged with Princess Irene of Greece, who, we all know, married afterward Prince Aimone of Savoia, Duca di Aosta)

Princess Thyra’s Sapphire Tiara

Set in gold and silver and dating from latter half of the 1800s, it includes small diamond designs between five large scrolling diamond elements, each with a sapphire at the center. The sapphires can be swapped out for turquoise stones. The tiara belonged to Princess Thyra of Denmark (1880-1945), who was the daughter of King Frederik VIII and Queen Louise. Thyra never married and had no children, and she left the tiara to her niece, Princess Caroline-Mathilde of Denmark (1912-1995).

Caroline-Mathilde was married to Knud, Hereditary Prince of Denmark, the second son of King Christian X and Queen Alexandrine. (Had history gone differently, Knud could have been the King of Denmark one day. He was next in line to his older brother, Frederik IX, who had only daughters at a time when women couldn’t inherit the throne. But the law was changed in 1953, and a young future Queen Margrethe and her sisters jumped ahead of him in line.) The couple had three children, and this tiara went to their only daughter, Princess Elisabeth. Princess Elisabeth is still in the line of succession for the Danish throne, and she sometimes attends official engagements. When a tiara is required, this is her constant favorite.

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♛ Royal Tiara Challenge ♛ 

Day 3 - Favorite Tiara from Denmark  

The Danish Ruby Parure: The Danish Ruby Parure’s history starts back at the time of Napoleon Bonaparte. Bonaparte wanted the grandest coronation in 1804 before he became Emperor of the French so he went as far as to give money to his marshals so that they could buy their wives the more dramatic jewels he envisioned for his the ladies attending the coronation to wear. One of Napoleon’s marshals, Jean Baptiste Bernadotte, bought a ruby and diamond wreath tiara for his wife Desiree Clary. The couple later became King Carl XIV Johan and Queen Desideria of Sweden. 

The tiara made the journey to Denmark with a Swedish Princess who later became Queen Consort of Denmark, Queen Louise, when she married King Frederik VIII in 1869. Louise received the tiara from Queen Desideria’s daughter-in-law, Queen Josephine of Sweden, because the main colors of the tiara are red and white, the colors of Denmark’s flag. Louise then passed the tiara down to her son’s bride, Queen Alexandrine of Denmark. 

Now, for one of the most well known parts of the parure’s story. Queen Alexandrine gave the tiara to her son’s bride, Princess Ingrid of Denmark aka Queen Ingrid of Denmark in 1935. Queen Ingrid was the one who created the extravagant Danish Ruby Parure we know today, beforehand the tiara was more of a wreath than tiara. Ingrid exclusively wore the tiara throughout her life and loaned it to her daughter, Princess Benedikte, once when Benedikte put a play together on Queen Desideria. 

After her death in 2000, Queen Ingrid passed the Danish Ruby Parure down to her grandson, Crown Prince Frederik to ensure that the future Crown Princess of Denmark would have a dramatic set of jewels to wear. Frederik’s wife Crown Princess Mary is now the current and only wearer of the parure. She first donned the jewels in 2004 for two of her and Frederik’s pre-wedding events. Mary typically wears the ruby parure for larger events (state banquets, the annual New Years Court gala, etc.) and took it out of Denmark for the first time to wear it to the wedding of Crown Princess Victoria of Sweden in 2010. Like Ingrid, Mary altered the tiara to her tastes in 2010 by rearranging the leaves on the tiara to make a more compact design and altered the frame to her head shape. Mary also decided to have jeweler, Marianne Dulong, create a matching ring and hairpins with the leftover pieces, which the Crown Princess is seen wearing frequently.