king alexander the great

Elagabalus: The Transgender Roman Emperor

Reign: 8 June 218 – 11 March 222

Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus was 14 years old when he became Roman Emperor. He is known to history as Elagabalus because he was from birth the high priest of the androgynous sun deity Elagabal. Elagabalus is recorded as having been one of the most infamous and degenerate figures in Roman history.

Elagabalus married and divorced five women but his most stable relationship seems to have been his chariot driver, a blond slave from Caria name Hierocles, whom he referred to as his husband. He married a man name Zoticus, an athlete from Smyrna, in a pubic ceremony at Rome.

When he was married to Hierocles, Elagabalus would dress like a woman and allow himself to be caught in the act of adultery by his husband, who would then beat him as husbands were then allowed to beat their wives.

Elagabalus would paint his eyes, epilate his hair and wear wigs before prostituting himself in taverns, brothels, and even in the imperial palace: 

“Finally, he set aside a room in the palace and there committed his indecencies, always standing nude at the door of the room, as the harlots do, and shaking the curtain which hung from gold rings, while in a soft and melting voice he solicited the passers-by. There were, of course, men who had been specially instructed to play their part. For, as in other matters, so in this business, too, he had numerous agents who sought out those who could best please him by the size of their penis. He would collect money from his patrons and give himself airs over his gains; he would also dispute with his associates in this shameful occupation, claiming that he had more lovers than they and took in more money.”

He was described as having been “delighted to be called the mistress, the wife, the queen of Hierocles” and was reported to have offered vast sums of money to any physician who could equip him with female genitalia.

One of his palace orgies was the scene of an inadvertent massacre when so many flower petals were showered upon the banquet guests that dozens of people suffocated to death as they reclined on their couches.

He was known to harness teams of naked women to his chariot and whip them as they pulled him around the palace grounds.

On his head, he wore a crown in the shape of a tiara, glittering with gold and precious stones.

He preferred to spend his days in the company of the palace women, singing, dancing and weaving.

The soldiers were revolted at the sight of him. With his face made up more elaborately than a modest woman, he was effeminately dressed up in golden necklaces and soft clothes, dancing for everyone to see.

At the age of 18, in March 222 AD, Rome’s soldiers finally rebelled against their Emperor. After slaughtering his minions and tearing out their vital organs, they then fell upon Elagabalus as he hid cowering in a latrine. After killing him, they dragged his body through the streets by a hook and attempted to stuff it into a sewer. When it proved too big, they threw him into the River Tiber.

Alexander The Great in front of the tomb of Achilles.

This painting in the Louvre Museum is a work of Hubert Robert (1733 -1808) done around 1754.

The subject taken from the Greek rhetorician Claudius Aelianius or Aelian (Varia Historia, XII, 7), writing in the second century CE, and shows the Macedonian king having the tomb of Achilles opened in order to pay a homage to the Greek hero of the Trojan War.

Achilles’ relationship with Patroclus is a key aspect of his myth. Its exact nature has been a subject of dispute in both the classical period and modern times. Thus in 5th-century BCE Athens, the relationship was commonly interpreted as pederastic. Nowadays some see it as a love relationship of an egalitarian homosexual couple. It is the same case as the relationship between Alexander the Great and Hephaestion. The relationship between the Macedonian king and his dearest and closest friend and confidant, lasted their whole lives, and was compared, by others as well as themselves, to that of Achilles and Patroclus. Hephaestion and Alexander grew up in a time and place where homosexual affairs were seen as perfectly normal. Roman and later writers, taking the Athenian pattern as their example, have tended to assume either, that their sexual relationship belonged to their adolescence, after which they left it behind, or that one of them was older, the lover (erastes) and the other was the beloved (eromenos). Claudius Aelianus takes the latter view when he uses just such an expression when describing the visit to Troy: “Alexander laid a garland on Achilles’ tomb and Hephaestion on Patroclus’, indicating that he was Alexander’s eromenos, as Patroclus was of Achilles.” No other circumstance shows better the nature and length of their relationship than Alexander’s overwhelming grief at Hephaestion’s death. The many and varied ways, both spontaneous and planned, by which Alexander poured out his grief are overwhelming. In the context of the nature of their relationship however, one stands out as remarkable. Lucius Flavius Arrianus “Xenophon” (Arrian of Nicomedia, ca. 86 – 160), in his work Ἀλεξάνδρου ἀνάβασις says that Alexander “… flung himself on the body of his friend and lay there nearly all day long in tears, and refused to be parted from him until he was dragged away by force by his Companions.

This painting by Robert (known as Robert des Ruines) is close to Panini, who was his teacher during his long stay of 11 years in Rome, and it is considered to be one of the first productions of the French artist in that city. In the painting by the French vedutista, an architectural fantasy, we see a pyramid similar to that of Caius Cestius in Rome, the ruins of a temple with Ionic columns inspired by the temple of Saturn in the Roman Forum and a round temple, after the Roman temple of Vesta, or the temple of the Sybile in Tivoli. The statue standing at the left-hand side of the canvas is the so-called Antinous of the Belvedere, or Antinous Admirandus, the famous statue in the Pio-Clementino Museum of the Vatican. This statue, correctly identified as a Hermes in the 19th century, was long taken to be a depiction of the beautiful Bythinian lover of Emperor Hadrian, one of the great “eromenos-erastes” relationship of the antiquity.

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Beautiful Ancient Coin with the Image of Alexander the Great

This is a silver tetradrachm from the Thracian Kingdom under the rule of Lysimachus. It was struck sometime after the death of Lysimachus in 281 BC at an undetermined mint. The obverse shows the head of Alexander the Great wearing a diadem and the horns of Ammon. The reverse shows Athena Nikephoros seated. There are two monograms, one of which is in a wreath and the inscription BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY.

Lysimachus (r. 323-281 BC) was a Macedonian officer and diadochus (i.e. “successor”) of Alexander the Great, who became a basileus (“King”) in 306 BC, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedon. Read more about Lysimachus here.

Never gon’ be president now! Never thought I’d see the day where I was drawing pictures of the First Secretary of the US Treasury and King George III, but the Hamilton soundtrack has forced my hand. I have the honour to be your Obedient Servant, M dot Barr’.

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HISTORY EDITS: Alexander the Great (July 356 BC - June 323 BC)

Alexander III of Macedon, commonly known as Alexander the Great, was king of Macedon and a member of the Argead dynasty. He was born in Pella in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II at the age of twenty. He spent most of his ruling years on military campaigns, and created one of the largest empires of the ancient world by the age of thirty, stretching from Greece to northwestern India. He was undefeated in battle until his death in Babylon in 323 BC. 

I’ve been reading this book, and is basically about history- Right now Im on the greeks, and they have a WHOLE chapter of Homer and the Illiad (Its killing me slowly, they said there was proof of the heroes being ACTUAL PEOPLE and not only characters, be still my patroclus heart) and I just wanted to point out that the greeks were far more accepting than us in terms of sexuality, but the book caused so much controversy because, apparently, you couldn’t be a hero and have a guy as your partner (remember all those history books were my babies were called platonic bros). Then, Alexander The Great, a FUCKING KING AND A CONQUEROR AND A BADASS, fucking claims himself as the direct descendant of Achilles and says, well, guess what, you didnt approve of patrochilles, so here you have me FUCKING SPENDING MILLIONS OF GOLD IN A FEAST AND THE FUCKING PYRE OF MY FUCKING BEST FRIEND AND LOVER WHO HAPPENS TO BE A GUY, and almost tattoes on his chest “gay4Hefestion” and I still dont understand why Alexander isn’t a great bisexual icon, he deserves reconition.

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Ancient Coin with the Image of the Persian God Baaltars

This silver stater was struck around 379 to 374 BC under the rule of the Persian satrap Phanabazos II at Tarsos (Tarsus) in Cilicia. The obverse bears the image of Baaltars seated and holding a lotus tipped scepter with ‘BLTRZ’ inscribed behind. The reverse shows a bearded and helmeted male head (possibly Ares) with the inscription  'FRNBZW HLK’.  Stunning natural iridescent toning. Extremely Fine.

Baaltars (combination of “Baal” and “Tarsus”) was a deity of the Persian Empire, the Baal or Zeus of the city of Tarsus. His depiction appears on coins of the Persian kings or satraps of Cilicia at Tarsus before Alexander the Great in the 5th and 4th century BC and also on the coins of the early Seleucids.

"Kings" ask game
  • Since so many people liked the “Queens” ask game, I decided to do the “Kings” ask game as well (yes, I know, I included emperors too).
  • Henry VIII.: most overrated ruler?
  • Alexander III of Russia: favorite historical person from your country?
  • Louis XIV: favorite crown jewels?
  • Frederick the Great: 3 things you love about your favorite ruler?
  • Philip II of Spain: favorite biography?
  • Richard III.: most interesting mystery in history?
  • Alexander the Great: favorite pharaoh?
  • Franz Joseph I. : favorite palace/castle?
  • Louis XVI: myth about your favorite ruler?
  • Gustav II Adolf: one question you would ask your favorite ruler?
  • Nicholas II of Russia: the most beautiful ruler?
  • James V of Scotland: favorite coat of arms?
  • Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor: favorite ruler with the same zodiac as you?
  • Frederick VI of Denmark: favorite era?
  • Maximilian I of Mexico: favorite royal house?
  • Genghis Khan: three facts about your favorite ruler?
  • George VI: favorite history blog on tumblr?

Facts about Demosthenes for your (and by your I mean my) extended metaphor purposes:

  • Was friends with actors who helped him improve his oratorical performances
  • Born with a speech impediment, he had to design exercises to train his voice.  These included:
    • speaking with rocks in his mouth
    • reciting speeches while running
    • speaking over the roar of the ocean
  • Became famous for his speeches against the invading Macedonian King, Phillip II, (Alexander the Great’s father)
  • Was admired by Alexander the Great, therefore not killed.
  • he tried to lead a popular uprising among the conquered Athenians, and when his capture was imminent, committed suicide by taking poison he’d hidden in a pen.
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Tomb of Thessalonike of Macedon

Vergina, Greece

300 BCE


Thessalonike (352 or 345 – 295 BC) was a Macedonian princess, the daughter of king Philip II of Macedon by his Thessalian wife or concubine, Nicesipolis, from Pherae. History links her to three of the most powerful men in Macedon—daughter of King Philip II, half sister of Alexander the Great and wife of Cassander.

Alexander, Aaron and the Great Revolution of 1776 (Prologue)

“Lafayette is fun
King George is crazy
Peggy is plain
Mulligan is fierce
Hamilton is a slut
Maria is hot
Jefferson is old-school
Eliza is good
Phillip is young
And Laurens isn’t here.”

(Based off Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812)

♡ LGBT+ Playlist ♡

♡ Jenny: The Studio Killers ♡
♡ She keeps me warm: Mary Lambert ♡
♡ Secrets: Mary Lambert ♡
♡ Girls like Girls: ♡
♡ Girls/Girls/Boys: Panic at the Disco ♡
♡ Born This Way: Lady Gaga ♡
♡ I U She: Peaches ♡
♡ Gay bar: electric six ♡
Troye sivan gasoline
♡ Handsome Man: Matt Alber ♡
♡ Chad King of a Great World: Hold Eachother ♡
♡ Olly Alexander: Years and Years ♡
♡ Frank Ocean: Forest Gump ♡
♡ Fuckin Perfect: Pink ♡
♡ Stay With Me: Sam Smith ♡
♡ Sara Bareilles: Brave ♡
♡ Same Love: Macklemore and Ryan Lewis♡

♡ Sometimes it’s difficult to find lgbt+ celebrities and artists when they have no mass media coverage! Other than a few obvious ones on the list I went digging around youtube and the internet to make a lovely little playlist for my 500+ followers. Thanks you guys, and here’s to you! ♡