king alexander the great

Never gon’ be president now! Never thought I’d see the day where I was drawing pictures of the First Secretary of the US Treasury and King George III, but the Hamilton soundtrack has forced my hand. I have the honour to be your Obedient Servant, M dot Barr’.

Alexander The Great in front of the tomb of Achilles.

This painting in the Louvre Museum is a work of Hubert Robert (1733 -1808) done around 1754.

The subject taken from the Greek rhetorician Claudius Aelianius or Aelian (Varia Historia, XII, 7), writing in the second century CE, and shows the Macedonian king having the tomb of Achilles opened in order to pay a homage to the Greek hero of the Trojan War.

Achilles’ relationship with Patroclus is a key aspect of his myth. Its exact nature has been a subject of dispute in both the classical period and modern times. Thus in 5th-century BCE Athens, the relationship was commonly interpreted as pederastic. Nowadays some see it as a love relationship of an egalitarian homosexual couple. It is the same case as the relationship between Alexander the Great and Hephaestion. The relationship between the Macedonian king and his dearest and closest friend and confidant, lasted their whole lives, and was compared, by others as well as themselves, to that of Achilles and Patroclus. Hephaestion and Alexander grew up in a time and place where homosexual affairs were seen as perfectly normal. Roman and later writers, taking the Athenian pattern as their example, have tended to assume either, that their sexual relationship belonged to their adolescence, after which they left it behind, or that one of them was older, the lover (erastes) and the other was the beloved (eromenos). Claudius Aelianus takes the latter view when he uses just such an expression when describing the visit to Troy: “Alexander laid a garland on Achilles’ tomb and Hephaestion on Patroclus’, indicating that he was Alexander’s eromenos, as Patroclus was of Achilles.” No other circumstance shows better the nature and length of their relationship than Alexander’s overwhelming grief at Hephaestion’s death. The many and varied ways, both spontaneous and planned, by which Alexander poured out his grief are overwhelming. In the context of the nature of their relationship however, one stands out as remarkable. Lucius Flavius Arrianus “Xenophon” (Arrian of Nicomedia, ca. 86 – 160), in his work Ἀλεξάνδρου ἀνάβασις says that Alexander “… flung himself on the body of his friend and lay there nearly all day long in tears, and refused to be parted from him until he was dragged away by force by his Companions.

This painting by Robert (known as Robert des Ruines) is close to Panini, who was his teacher during his long stay of 11 years in Rome, and it is considered to be one of the first productions of the French artist in that city. In the painting by the French vedutista, an architectural fantasy, we see a pyramid similar to that of Caius Cestius in Rome, the ruins of a temple with Ionic columns inspired by the temple of Saturn in the Roman Forum and a round temple, after the Roman temple of Vesta, or the temple of the Sybile in Tivoli. The statue standing at the left-hand side of the canvas is the so-called Antinous of the Belvedere, or Antinous Admirandus, the famous statue in the Pio-Clementino Museum of the Vatican. This statue, correctly identified as a Hermes in the 19th century, was long taken to be a depiction of the beautiful Bythinian lover of Emperor Hadrian, one of the great “eromenos-erastes” relationship of the antiquity.

Elagabalus: The Transgender Roman Emperor

Reign: 8 June 218 – 11 March 222

Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus was 14 years old when he became Roman Emperor. He is known to history as Elagabalus because he was from birth the high priest of the androgynous sun deity Elagabal. Elagabalus is recorded as having been one of the most infamous and degenerate figures in Roman history.

Elagabalus married and divorced five women but his most stable relationship seems to have been his chariot driver, a blond slave from Caria name Hierocles, whom he referred to as his husband. He married a man name Zoticus, an athlete from Smyrna, in a pubic ceremony at Rome.

When he was married to Hierocles, Elagabalus would dress like a woman and allow himself to be caught in the act of adultery by his husband, who would then beat him as husbands were then allowed to beat their wives.

Elagabalus would paint his eyes, epilate his hair and wear wigs before prostituting himself in taverns, brothels, and even in the imperial palace: 

“Finally, he set aside a room in the palace and there committed his indecencies, always standing nude at the door of the room, as the harlots do, and shaking the curtain which hung from gold rings, while in a soft and melting voice he solicited the passers-by. There were, of course, men who had been specially instructed to play their part. For, as in other matters, so in this business, too, he had numerous agents who sought out those who could best please him by the size of their penis. He would collect money from his patrons and give himself airs over his gains; he would also dispute with his associates in this shameful occupation, claiming that he had more lovers than they and took in more money.”

He was described as having been “delighted to be called the mistress, the wife, the queen of Hierocles” and was reported to have offered vast sums of money to any physician who could equip him with female genitalia.

One of his palace orgies was the scene of an inadvertent massacre when so many flower petals were showered upon the banquet guests that dozens of people suffocated to death as they reclined on their couches.

He was known to harness teams of naked women to his chariot and whip them as they pulled him around the palace grounds.

On his head, he wore a crown in the shape of a tiara, glittering with gold and precious stones.

He preferred to spend his days in the company of the palace women, singing, dancing and weaving.

The soldiers were revolted at the sight of him. With his face made up more elaborately than a modest woman, he was effeminately dressed up in golden necklaces and soft clothes, dancing for everyone to see.

At the age of 18, in March 222 AD, Rome’s soldiers finally rebelled against their Emperor. After slaughtering his minions and tearing out their vital organs, they then fell upon Elagabalus as he hid cowering in a latrine. After killing him, they dragged his body through the streets by a hook and attempted to stuff it into a sewer. When it proved too big, they threw him into the River Tiber.

"Kings" ask game
  • Since so many people liked the “Queens” ask game, I decided to do the “Kings” ask game as well (yes, I know, I included emperors too).
  • Henry VIII.: most overrated ruler?
  • Alexander III of Russia: favorite historical person from your country?
  • Louis XIV: favorite crown jewels?
  • Frederick the Great: 3 things you love about your favorite ruler?
  • Philip II of Spain: favorite biography?
  • Richard III.: most interesting mystery in history?
  • Alexander the Great: favorite pharaoh?
  • Franz Joseph I. : favorite palace/castle?
  • Louis XVI: myth about your favorite ruler?
  • Gustav II Adolf: one question you would ask your favorite ruler?
  • Nicholas II of Russia: the most beautiful ruler?
  • James V of Scotland: favorite coat of arms?
  • Francis II, Holy Roman Emperor: favorite ruler with the same zodiac as you?
  • Frederick VI of Denmark: favorite era?
  • Maximilian I of Mexico: favorite royal house?
  • Genghis Khan: three facts about your favorite ruler?
  • George VI: favorite history blog on tumblr?
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Beautiful Ancient Coin with the Image of Alexander the Great

This is a silver tetradrachm from the Thracian Kingdom under the rule of Lysimachus. It was struck sometime after the death of Lysimachus in 281 BC at an undetermined mint. The obverse shows the head of Alexander the Great wearing a diadem and the horns of Ammon. The reverse shows Athena Nikephoros seated. There are two monograms, one of which is in a wreath and the inscription BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY.

Lysimachus (r. 323-281 BC) was a Macedonian officer and diadochus (i.e. “successor”) of Alexander the Great, who became a basileus (“King”) in 306 BC, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedon. Read more about Lysimachus here.

if oikawa is loosely based off of alexander the great (his nickname, the grand king and his and iwaizumi’s birthdays being on the birth and death of alexander the great respectively), iwaizumi could possibly be loosely based off of hephaestion (alexander the great’s closest/childhood friend, general and bodyguard and sometimes theorized as his lover

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Alexander the Great Wedding Night with Roxanne.

She was an exotic flower, too beautiful, but also too fierce.
She was a rose almost without petals, only with thorns.
And that ferocity was what Alexander loved of her, that hatred she pretended to have.

Every night spent with her meant for him to play his life.
But he ordered his guards to stay away. Then Roxanne attacked the feminine side of Alexander, and reduced it, consumed it.

She was the conqueror, and he her captive, her owner too, her husband, and her lover defeated.

“Give me a son,” he said non-stop. And he dreamed of a strong son with blue eyes, a perfect blend of her masculinity and his femininity.

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Oikawa and Iwaizumi were born on the day of birth and death of Alexander the Great. 
Oikawa is a King, flying for the sun infinitely. Only Death Iwaizumi – can ground a King.

Historical figures that share your zodiac sign

Aries: Charlie Chaplin, Harry Houdini, Clyde Barrow, Johann Sebastian Bach

Taurus: William Shakespeare, Fred Astaire, Sigmund Freud, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Adolf Hitler

Gemini: Marilyn Monroe, Queen Victoria, Josephine Baker, Anne Frank

Cancer: Alexander The Great, King Henry VII, Ernest Hemmingway, Julius Caesar

Leo: Neil Armstrong, Amelia Earhart, Coco Chanel, Orville Wright

Virgo: Queen Elizabeth I, King Louis XIV, Agatha Christie, Roald Dahl

Libra: Bonnie Parker, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mahatma Gandhi, Confucius

Scorpio: Queen Marie Antoinette, Chirstopher Columbus, Marie Curie, Grace Kelly

Sagittarius: Joseph Stalin, Walt Disney, Jane Austen, Billy The Kid

Capricorn: Martin Luther King Jr., Edgar Allan Poe, Isaac Newton, Al Capone

Aquarius: Abraham Lincoln, Charles Dickens, Rosa Parks, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Pisces: George Washington, Albert Einstein, Michelangelo, Wyatt Earp

A royal candid image

From left to right : Prince Valdemar of Denmark, Prince George of Great Britain (future King George V), Princess Marie of Greece, Tsar Alexander III of Russia, Tsaritsa Maria Feodorovna of Russia, Queen Olga of the Hellenes, Prince Nicolaos of Greece and cut in half, Tsarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich of Russia, future Tsar Nicholas II. Early 1890s.

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Can we just talk about this for a moment? One of my favorite bands just dropped a new album and guess what it is a cover of…fucking HAMILTON!!!!! And it sounds pretty damn good. 

Rider (Iskander/Alexander the Great)

The famous king of Macedonia and a military genius known for his conquer of the Persian Empire. It is said that when Iskander was twelve, he tamed an unruly horse known for eating human flesh. The famous scholar Aristotle tutored Iskander in all worldly knowledge.

He and eighty of his closest friends would marry Persian Noblewomen and Iskander believed that a unity could be formed between both cultures and even adopted many Persian traditions. When his closest companion Cleitus became angered by this he denounced him as the rightful king and Iskander grew so angry that he struck down Cleitus. The King would deeply regret this action for the rest of his life.

He would succumb to a fever after attending a private party held by his friend Medius.

He was thirty three.