kindness-&-courage

Always be kind and courageous, It’s your that power no one ever can steal away.


( poetryandthemoon )

“Belle is the feminist princess so much better than Cinderella who is a bad role model for girls!”

Oh. Oh really

So she was a bad role model when she:

  • Stood up to her abuser twice
  • Didn’t whine or moan about only getting until midnight at the ball
  • Used the derogatory name her abusers had given her to proudly announce herself to the prince because she wouldn’t let them win
  • Remained kind and courageous through the abuse she endured
  • Worried more about the man who delivered her the news about her father’s death than herself (”that must have been very difficult for you”)
  • Forgave her abuser, because she knew continuing to stay mad would only bring her down.
  • Felt sorry for how her stepsisters because of what they had become due to their mother
  • Had just had her mother’s dress destroyed and the chance of meeting her only friend taken away from her, but still cared for the beggar woman who asked for some milk
  • Didn’t try to hide who she was for the prince
  • Told a man of wealth off for hunting after a stag - “just because its what’s done doesn’t mean its what should be done!”
  • Cared for all her animals

A female character doesn’t just have to punch things and not wear a corset to be a good role model. I love Belle, but don’t dismiss Cinderella when she’s just as good as a role model as Belle!

(also feel free to add what I have missed!)

9

moodboard: neville longbottom 

there are all kinds of courage. it takes a great deal of bravery to stand up to our enemies, but just as much to stand up to our friends. i therefore award ten points to mr neville longbottom.”

@harrypotternetwork & @nevilledefensenet creation event

Differences between popular fanon and IDW G1 canon:

Popular fanon: Optimus was a devoted spiritual leader.

IDW G1 canon: Optimus was an atheist.

Popular fanon: Rodimus was a young yet capable leader.

IDW G1 canon: Rodimus was a man-child.

Popular fanon: Arcee was a people-person with gentle spark.

IDW G1 canon: Arcee was socially awkward and undefeatable warrior.

Popular fanon: Bluestreak was a sweet woobie who needed a hug.

IDW G1 canon: Bluestreak was a traitor.

Popular fanon: You can trust Prowl.

IDW G1 canon: You cannot trust Prowl.

Popular fanon: Jazz was a charming social butterfly that could woo anyone, no matter what species they were.

IDW G1 canon: Have you seen how awkward Jazz was trying to reach out to that girl?

Popular fanon: Orion Pax was a nerdy bookworm with kind heart and hidden courage, hated violence and good at diplomatic.

IDW G1 canon: Orion Pax was a super cop, diplomatic was not his strong suit, and when really, really angry he quick to resort to violence (asked Prowl).

Popular fanon: Sideswipe was a witty prankster and talented merchant.

IDW G1 canon: According to TV Tropes, Sideswipe was a dumb muscle.

Popular fanon: Sunstreaker was the writers’ favourite twin to kill in order to induce angst.

IDW G1 canon: Sunstreaker was Simon Furman’s favourite plaything.

Popular fanon: Ultra Magnus was Optimus’s brother.

IDW G1 canon: Ultra Magnus was a legacy.

Popular fanon: The Dinobots and the Protectobots were Ratchet and Wheeljack’s children.

IDW G1 canon: They were not related.

Popular fanon: Swoop was the Dinobots’ field medic.

IDW G1 canon: The Dinobots used to have a medic and he was not Swoop.

Popular fanon: Perceptor was never wrong no matter what he did (and he was awesome even without a sniper gun).

IDW G1 canon: Perceptor sometimes did something wrong…

Popular fanon: Elita-1 was a badass female leader.

IDW G1 canon: Elita was a badass female leader and evil.

Popular fanon: Jetfire/Skyfire was Starscream’s Morality Pet.

IDW G1 canon: Did they ever interact with each other?

Popular fanon: Wheeljack was the one responsible for inventing bizarre, mind-blowing inventions.

IDW G1 canon: That job fell to Brainstorm.

Popular fanon: Combiners teams were siblings and were a norm in Cybertronian society.

IDW G1 canon: Combiners teams were five or six unrelated bots forced to join together and were considered perversion by some.

Popular fanon: Sideswipe and Sunstreaker were inseparable.

IDW G1 canon: Sideswipe and Sunstreaker had strain relationship.

Popular fanon: Sideswipe and Sunstreaker were known as the Terror Twins.

IDW canon: Arcee and Galvatron were the Terror Twins.

Popular fanon: Ratchet was grumpy and caring.

IDW G1 canon: Ratchet was grumpy and caring.

Emotional Starters

-Send one or two in my askbox and I’ll write a starter where my muse feels….

☀️- Joyful
🌙- Thoughtful
☁️- Gloomy
🌧- Sad
🌦- Hopeful
🌪- Angered
🌈- Proud
💨- Afraid
💥- Disgusted
⚡️- Surprised
🌟- In Love
🌨- Ashamed
🌑- Pitiful
🌝- Envious
❄️- Cruel
☄️- Courageous
✨- Kind
🌤- Shy
💦- Guilt

How to feel like an angel

*Wear white

*Grow your hair long

*Use shimmer lotion or coconut oil to make your skin glow

*Use gold eye makeup

*Clean and declutter your room

*Pray, meditate, listen

*Oil your nails

*Listen to gentle music

*Sing frequently

*Clean your face and let it breathe

*Be brave and compassionate; courageous and kind

*Use rose water liberally

*Help those in need

*Wear perfume with frankincense or vanilla or roses

*Use a wooden comb

*Dance often

The 1 Element Your Flawed Character MUST HAVE

If you’re a reader, you’ve probably experienced this before: you pick up a book, it seems pretty interesting, you nonchalantly decide to read it – “whatever, might be good” – and then … 

A paperback explodes life as you know it.  

Encountering a book like this can give life sudden clarity, it can change the way you look at the world, it can help you overcome something and grow, it can give you new purpose, it can inspire you to change your life, it can transform your future. By the time you’ve finished that book, it has become a part of your life – and will probably remain that way forever. (*Holds up my battered copy of Narnia as evidence*)

This magical experience is pretty much the ultimate goal for a reader. But if you’re a reader AND a writer, the fulfilling moment is inevitably marred by one depressing thought:  

“I’ll never write anything that good.”  

To which I say:

I beg to differ, little discouraging voice. With dedication and persistence, anyone can write a story that will be deeply meaningful to a reader. 

The trick? It needs to be deeply meaningful to the writer first. 

If a writer is going to give a reader a life-altering piece of knowledge, that means the writer already has that knowledge to give. We have all experienced things worthy of a story. We are all characters, journeying through arc after arc, becoming better or worse. From living these stories, we learn and see things more clearly, just as protagonists do. Which means we have something to say, something to write about, something to give. 

But to do so, we have to shoot for art.

The word art seems terribly vague, unattainable, and intimidating. But I don’t think it has to be. By “art” I’m going by the definitions given in two of my favorites quotes about writing (writing is art, so these apply): 

“Art is born when the temporary touches the eternal.” – G K  Chesterton

and

“…It is an art. It is the best of all possible art, a finite picture of the infinite.” – N D Wilson  

Both quotes state the same thing, in different ways. Art is about depicting and communicating something true, something universal, something everlasting about life and humanity, through something tangibly created. A definition which sounds an awful lot like the definition of metaphor: “a thing regarded as representative or symbolic of something else, especially something abstract.” Which sounds a lot like storytelling, because story IS metaphor. It’s life, condensed and magnified, all of its components there for a specific reason – to represent and convey some deeper meaning. So storytelling is naturally suited to being art. Which is good news for writers.

But it can also mean trouble. Storytelling is proven to be one of the most powerful teaching methods there is; a story actually has the power to get into someone’s head and heart and change everything, because to a reader’s mind the events on the page are actually happening. They’re living another life, a life that seeks to prove whatever the author wants to say. So writers have a responsibility to make sure the meaning of their story is true, morally and logically. 

BUT HOW DOES THIS ALL RELATE TO THE MAIN CHARACTER?!

Your main character is flawed, both in ways that only hurt themselves, and in ways that hurt others. These flaws are causing them to ruin their own lives. If they don’t awaken to this unwelcome truth about themselves, they will be lost. What happens to them over the course of the story, as they go after their singular goal, is going to apply pressure to these flaws until someone new – and most of the time, better – is made. The journey will teach them something, and that knowledge will enable them to overcome their weaknesses and forge a better life. 

And I bet you can guess what that story will teach them. That thing that is deeply meaningful for you, so meaningful you want to share it with readers? Yup, that’s what your main character is going to learn.

It’s going to be the SOLUTION to their inner problems. When it comes to characters, the meaning can be wrestled into three parts, adding up into one concise sentence. 

1) To achieve *a better state of being*

2) One must *moral and mental requirement*

3) Or else *the inner stakes*

To see how this works, let’s look at a fairy tale, the most straightforward example of this concept: 

Let’s see Cinderella (the live-action 2015 version). 

The meaning of the movie is summed up in this scene, and the story seeks to prove it throughout: 

“Have courage and be kind… It has power, more than you know. And magic.”

The story revolves around this notion, and everything seeks to represent it and prove it, in true Fairy Tale fashion.  

So in one line, that Ella’s arc proves: To achieve victory over abusers, one must hold onto their courage, kindness, and goodness no matter what – or else succumb and turn into someone like them. 

Exemplified in her last words to her stepmother, that truly defeat her forevermore:

So! Constructing these sentences can help give our flawed characters a destination to motor towards. Which makes writing their arcs much easier. And maybe we can construct a character arc and story that will become one of those magical reading experiences for a reader. And then, maybe one day, we’ll get letters from our reader, telling us exactly what our stories gave them and how it has saved their life in some small way (or maybe not so small way.) 

If finding a book like this is ultimate goal of a reader, I think getting a letter like that is the ultimate goal for a writer. 

Well, there’s my motivation. Time to go figure out what the heck I want my book to say. 

7

Being gay is not a virtue. It’s not a flaw, but it’s not a virtue. Attributes that you may develop out of being gay, like empathetic or couragous or kind of… Selfish… May result in being gay but the thing itself is not a talent or a virtue. It’s not something you can actually cultivate. So therefor, it actually hasn’t got more value than being straight does. So we have to look at who we are as people and how we can support everybody.  

sometimes i see posts on my dash about that night louis performed just hold on for the first time at the x factor and i usually scroll past them very quickly because if i start really looking at them my eyes get all watery and my heart breaks every time a little more. today i’ve decided to really look at one of them and i honestly still can’t believe what kind of strength and courage louis had that night. it blows me away and i just wanna say how proud i am of him and of everything he does. he deserves all the good things in the world and i’m still waiting for karma to finally catch up and give him all the sweet sweet happiness he deserves.

I think one of my favourite things about “Steven Universe”, and one of the things I find most touching and personally affirming, is the relationship between Rose Quartz and Greg.

I mean, here’s Rose, who’s represented as this powerful, intelligent, charismatic, beautiful woman, respected as both a warrior and a leader.  She travels to Earth and decides to spend her life there, and in 6000 years, the human she decides is most interesting, most engaging, most beautiful…is Greg.  

Greg is a doofus.  He’s bald.  He’s fat.  He’s a slob with no sense of style or grooming.  He’s practically homeless.  He’s a failed rock and roll star whose dreams of fame and fortune ended with him running a small town car wash and living in the back of an ancient van. In any other show, he would be the loser of the cast, the fuck-up, the somewhat lovable, helpless goofball who can’t be counted on for anything.

But Rose thought he was beautiful.

It’s something of a sitcom parody; the dimwitted, ugly, slovenly husband with the beautiful, intelligent wife.  Fred and Wilma, Archie and Edith, Peter and Lois, Homer and Marge.  But Rose and Greg’s relationship isn’t like that.  Even in my favourite of those relationships, that of Marge and Homer, Homer is presented as more than a bit of a jerk.  Oh, he’s a fundamentally decent man who genuinely loves his family and treasures his wife, but he’s also selfish, thoughtless, more than occasionally neglectful, lazy, and self-centered.  And more than that, in those shows, the husband is really the main character.  Most of the wife’s role is reacting to his antics.  But that’s not Rose and Greg’s story.

Greg is a good man.  Not just a decent guy under the jerky exterior, but a truly and fundamentally good man.  He stands up to his misogynist buddy.  He adores and encourages his son in every way.  He is kind and giving to everyone he meets.  He works hard, even though it’s a job that he never wanted and that has taken the place of his dream.  Speaking of that, even though he’s never seen even a lick of the stardom he dreamed of, Greg has never lost sight of his ambitions.  He still plays music, still sings, still performs, still writes albums.  Greg may never make it as a rock star, but he will never stop trying.  This is what Rose saw.  This is what Rose, one of the most powerful and respected warriors and generals of her people, came to love.

In a world where success and worth are measured primarily in material gains and career-based achievements, Greg is a reminder of what’s truly important.  In the show, his failed music career, his chubby build, his sloppy clothes, his poverty…they don’t matter.  What’s emphasised is the true, human beauty of Greg; the warmth, the kindness, the courage, the imagination, the dedication to art and devotion to family.  It’s a reminder to all of us who have been pushed to be “successful”, been hassled about when we were “going to get serious”…that even if we are living in poverty, even if we have no real career, even if we’re not conventionally attractive or haven’t achieved all we’ve wanted to…we still have value.  We still have beauty.  And we are still loved.