kid with moves

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“We talked about it [about marriage]. I think, both me and Marzia, kinda feel like when we want to, we will, but we’re still young…we’re still beautiful. What’s the rush? You keep seeing these young couples getting married way too soon, you know, and it all goes to the shitter. You want that to happen? Is that what you want? Don’t think so….so until then…shut the fuck up” [x]

I’m happy for you, I really am… But that doesn’t mean that I don’t wish that I could change your mind and make you want to be with me again. I can’t change your mind and the more I think about it, the more I wonder why I want to so damn bad.
—  Okay

N̡ͫ̚e̊̊͒̆v̨̔̌ͬͧ̎̋ͣȇ̌̓̃ͦ̌̂ȓ̄͘-̐̃Ė͋͂ͩ̓͛͏n̽̎̃̈̃ͫ́dͮͮͮͯ̅̀ͪi̅͗ͤ̆̉̍͝n̈́̀̉ḡ ͐́ͦ͋N̛ĩ̓̉͋̓̌ǵ̏̾ͬh̴̔ͯ̿ͭt̂̊m̈́̏ͪ͐ͥ̚â̶̊̂͆̿ͪrͦ̂̃ͬ́̄̈e̵͆̊̎

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GRIMM | 6.12

I thought I lost you once already tonight. Be careful.

AU where Bruce doesn’t recover from his amnesia for a long while but the kids move back home. Daily life turns into “Dad can’t know we’re superheroes.”
Points for when he gets up for a midnight snack and Tim and Jason are walking past covered in bandages.
“What the hell happened?”
“Wrestling match.”
Bonus: “Why does my ten year old son have a katana?”
“Collector’s item, very rare.”
“It has blood on it.”

The dub of episode 12 was wonderful, but one line really stood out to me, as a summary of the unique format of the Yuri on Ice story and how it plays with the usual happy ending cliches. (It was in the sub as well, and it caught my eye there as well but something about hearing it made it a lot more interesting.)

“No tale is more compelling, than one that never ends.”

In context, it’s about JJ and Seung Gil Lee, two skaters who are in the prime of their career and whose subtle interactions with each other will continue long past the Grand Prix Final. After all, the Grand Prix is just the start of the skating season. There is so much left to do, and so many stories to be told on the sidelines of the greater Victor/Yuri arc. 

And the thing about skating is that it never stops. Individual skaters work through their careers, but then they coach or choreograph or inspire other younger skaters, who step into their places and continue refining the art. It’s a neverending story, one that only gets greater over time. There’s so much love for the immortality of the ice- the infinite and eternal possibility of greater things in the future- in the writing. No ends, no neatly tied up resolutions. Everything keeps going, and that perpetual motion is beautiful. 

Look at the story we get told with Yuri on Ice. It starts with two skaters in a standstill, trying to figure out how to move forward with their lives. Their victory is not winning a gold medal or getting married and having babies, it’s continuing with their careers, continuing to contribute to the eternal story. They don’t get to settle down, they get to be immortal.

Even if we get a season two, I don’t think we’ll ever get a cut and dried ending, where everyone waltzes into the sunset. That would be a betrayal of the story they’re trying to tell. It isn’t about finding happiness, it’s about progress, about inspiring each other to be better skaters and attaining happiness in the process. 

Maybe one of the main characters will retire, but certainly not permanently. There will always be the next generation in the wings to be tutored, a surprise comeback to be made. One more competition, one more year, one more medal or routine, all the way into forever. 

Not only is that sort of open ended storytelling uniquely poignant, it’s also perfect for a show that endeavors not just to tell a love story but to tell the story of an entire sport. Nothing ever stops, there is no final goal to reach, only an ever evolving conglomerate of beauty that every athlete contributes to. A happy ending for Yuri on Ice is an anti-ending, one forever that promises a more glorious future just around the corner.