kickoff coverage

Some of The Greatest Sports Photos of All Time

Jacques Plante - Canadiens at Rangers, Dec. 18, 1957

Montreal Canadiens goalie Jacques Plante surveys the ice without a mask during a game between the Canadiens and the New York Rangers at Madison Square Garden. Plante was the first NHL goalie to wear a goaltender mask on an everyday basis, a practice he started during the 1959-60 season.

Muhammad Ali and Cleveland Williams - Nov. 14, 1966

Ali knocks out Cleveland ‘Big Cat’ Williams in three rounds at the Houston Astrodome to defend his heavyweight title in November 1966. The bout drew a record indoor crowd of 35,460.

Dennis Rodman - Pacers at Bulls, March 7, 1997

Chicago Bulls power forward Dennis Rodman goes horizontal for a loose ball during a game against the Pacers at the United Center in Chicago, Ill. Rodman won his sixth rebounding title during the 1996-97 season averaging 16.1 total rebounds a game.

Greg Olson - World Series Game 1, Oct. 19, 1991

Atlanta Braves catcher Greg Olson goes head over heels after tagging Minnesota left fielder Dan Gladden out at home during Game 1 of the 1991 World Series. The Twins would win Game 1, 5-2, and go on to win the Series in seven games

Pittsburgh Pirates Fans - 1960 World Series, Oct. 13, 1960

University of Pittsburgh students cheer as they look down on Forbes Field from the top of their campus’s Cathedral of Learning as the Pirates are winning their first World Series in 35 years against the Yankees. In Game 7, Bill Mazeroski hit the first walk-off home run in World Series history, a shot over the left-field fence that gave the Pirates a 10-9 win.

Mike Tyson and Evander - Holyfield Heavyweight Bout, June 28, 1997

Mike Tyson bites the ear of Evander Holyfield during their 1997 heavyweight fight. Tyson’s boxing license was temporarily revoked for the incident and he was fined $3 million

Julien Leparoux and Sanibel Storm - Keeneland Race Course, April 28, 2006

Jockey Julien Leparoux tries to hold on to the bridle as he is catapulted off Sanibel Storm, which hit the rail during the stretch run. The jockey and horse were both uninjured.

Tommie Smith and John Carlos - Summer Olympics, Oct. 16, 1968

American sprinters Tommie Smith (center) and John Carlos (right) raise their black-gloved fists on the Olympic medal podium in Mexico City to signify Black Power. Smith, the gold medalist in the 200-meter race, and Carlos, the bronze medalist, were kicked out of the Games for their overtly political statement.

Carmen Basilio and Tony DeMarco - Nov. 30, 1955

Carmen Basilio (right) celebrates with his cornermen after knocking out Tony DeMarco (left) in the 12th round for the world welterweight title.

Ervin Kovacs - Paralympic Games, Sept. 21, 2004

Hungary swimmer Ervin Kovacs starts the 200-meter freestyle SM5 at the Paralympic Games. Kovacs took the silver medal in the race, finishing behind only China’s Junquan He.

Pete Rose - Reds vs. Cubs, August 1975

Cincinnati’s Pete Rose dives into third base in a game with the Cubs at Wrigley Field. Baseball’s all-time hits leader, Rose was 4-for-9 and drew eight walks during the series with Chicago.

Joe Namath - Bills at Jets, Dec. 8, 1974

New York Jets quarterback Joe Namath listens on the sidelines during a messy New York Jets-Buffalo Bills Game. The Jets would win 20-10 behind Namath’s 131 yards and two passing touchdowns.

Maxwell Fornah and Victor Musa - Sierra Leone, April 6, 2006

The members of the Single Leg Amputee Sports Club of Sierra Leone chase for the ball in Freetown. A brutal civil war left more than 6,000 amputees in Sierra Leone.

Bobby Orr - Stanley Cup finals Game 4, May 10, 1970

Boston Bruins defenseman Bobby Orr celebrates his Cup-winning goal during overtime of Game 4 of the Stanley Cup finals against the St. Louis Blues. Orr would win MVP honors, and the victory was Boston’s first Cup in 29 years

Bob Beamon - Summer Olympics, Oct. 18, 1968

U.S. track and field athlete Bob Beamon flies through the air during his world record long jump of 8.9 meters at the 1968 Summer Olympics in Mexico City. Beamon’s jump, which inspired a new adjective for spectacular feats ('Beamonesque’), stood as the world record for 23 years.

Bobby Martin - Belmont High at Colonel White High, Sept. 24, 2005

Three-foot, 112-pound Bobby Martin played on punt and kickoff coverage and was the backup varsity noseguard for Dayton’s Colonel White High. Born without legs, he can’t wear prosthetics because he has no thighs to affix them to.

Muhammad Ali and Sonny Liston - May 25, 1965

In their heavyweight title rematch Ali defeated Liston by knockout in the first round. Ali would hold the heavyweight title until 1967, when he was stripped of it for refusing to be drafted into the Army.

Brandi Chastain - Women’s World Cup, July 10, 1999

U.S. women’s soccer player Brandi Chastain exults after kicking the World Cup-winning penalty kick in the 1999 Women’s World Cup final.

Michael Jordan - All-Star Weekend, Feb. 6, 1988

Air Jordan takes off from the free throw line and soars to a perfect score of 50 to defeat Dominique Wilkins in the finals of the Slam Dunk Contest. It was the second straight title for the Bulls star, and the '88 contest is widely considered the best ever because of the duel between Jordan and Wilkins.

Referee Jack Vaughn - Eagles at Bears, Dec. 31, 1988

Referee Jack Vaughn tries to follow a field goal attempt from Eagles placekicker Luis Zendejas during the Fog Bowl, a 1988 NFC divisional playoff game between the Eagles and the Bears in Chicago, Ill. A heavy sheet of fog rolled over Soldier Field during the second quarter, cutting visibility to around 10-20 yards for the remainder of the game.

Casey Sanders and Julius Peppers - Chapel Hill, N.C., March 4, 2001

Casey Sanders of Duke (20) tries to stop North Carolina’s Julius Peppers at the Dean E. Smith Center. No. 2 Duke defeated No. 4 North Carolina 95-81.

OMGCP Football AU

Alright so here’s my Football AU for @zimmerbittle and their anon (that I honestly spent too much time thinking about and probably got way too technical with but I’m a football nerd so lol):

  • Jack is the quarterback, obviously.  It’s the most visible position on the field, and it’s also the position that’s under the most pressure.  Jack was being recruited to play D-I football since he was in middle school, that was until his OD, at which point the only offers he got were from Football Championship Subdivision teams (FCS), which was how he ended up at Samwell.
  • So given Bitty’s size, the obvious choice is to put him at kicker, but that’s not what I see.  I think he would be more of a player in the mold of Maurice Jones-Drew/Danny Woodhead/Darren Sproles.  Short, but fast as hell, shifty as fuck, with good hands out of the backfield and surprising power between the tackles.  Only problem is, he’s a terrible pass blocker.  Any time he sees those big defensive ends coming his way, he just whiffs.  He’s giving up way too many sacks, which is how they end up on the practice field at 5AM working on blocking.
  • Ransom and Holster, being d-men, are the team’s defensive ends, in the vein of Dwight Freeney/Robert Mathis when they were both in Indianapolis: great pass rushers with a habit of meeting each other at the other team’s QB.
  • Johnson is the nose tackle (Samwell plays a 3-4 defense).  The NT is often the most important part of a 3-4 defense, and is also almost always overlooked.
  • Shitty is Jack’s go to receiver.  He’s a wideout, and he mostly plays in the slot.  He’s very much a Wes Welker-type receiver, making a lot of short catches and tough grabs over the middle.
  • Dex and Nursey are both defensive backs.  Nursey is a corner, and he’s great at tight bump and run coverage, but tends to be too chill about playing off coverage, letting guys blow past him too easily, leaving Dex, the free safety, to chase them down to keep big plays from happening.
  • Chowder is the kicker.  He’s strangely super enthusiastic about it, but he’s also really fucking clutch.  It’s like he’s got ice in his veins.  One time, during his freshman year, he kicked a 55-yard field goal as time expired to give Samwell the 22-21 win, at it would’ve been good from at least 65 yards.  Also, he’s actually surprisingly good at kickoff coverage.  Where most kickers shy away from sticking their noses in and making tackles, Chowder actually loves it.  He’s a key part of Samwell’s kickoff coverage team, and he catches a lot of guys off guard because nobody expects the kicker to be running at them full speed.

This is as far as I’ve gotten, but if y’all want me to keep this going, I totally will (bc like I said, football nerd).

PEYTON MANNING SETS NFL RECORD WITH 51 TD’S ON THE SEASON - Peyton Manning has broken Tom Brady’s NFL record for most touchdown passes in a season with 51.

Denver’s Manning did it on a 25-yard pass to Julius Thomas with 4:28 remaining in the game Sunday against the Texans. Just 2 ½ minutes earlier, he tied the mark with a 20-yard pass to Eric Decker.

Manning made the throw to Thomas and walked toward the end zone, where his teammates patted him on the head. He then took off his helmet and walking to the sideline and pumped his fist once. His teammates came out to greet him and he gave dozens of high-fives as he grinned and walked to the bench.

Decker somehow got the ball after the touchdown and tucked it in the side of his jersey, where it remained as he walked off the field.

Manning entered the game with 47 TDs and his first touchdown came on a 36-yard pass to Demaryius Thomas in the second quarter. The second one was a 10-yard throw to Decker early in the fourth period.

Brady set the record, which previously belonged to Manning, in 2007. Manning had established the record by throwing 49 touchdown passes in 2004.

Surrounded by the best targets he’s ever had, operating a turbocharged assault with a body that’s much less a question mark, Manning is putting up record numbers like he did in that remarkable 2004 season.

That year, Marvin Harrison, Reggie Wayne and Brandon Stokley all topped 1,000 yards receiving. Manning established NFL records with 49 touchdown throws and a 121.1 passer rating, marks since surpassed by Brady and Aaron Rodgers (122.5).

Manning was the NFL’s 2012 Comeback Player of the Year, showing he was every bit as good as before. He’s having his best season at age 37, just two years removed from the four neck surgeries that weakened his right triceps and threatened his career. He hadn’t missed a start with the Colts before 2011.

Last week, Houston interim coach Wade Phillips said Manning’s season was “just the best year ever of any quarterback.”

Manning began 2013 by becoming the first quarterback since 1969 to throw for seven touchdowns in a game. Earlier this month he broke an NFL record he held with Brett Favre for most playoff appearances when he qualified for his 13th trip to the postseason.

Although he could set several more standards this season, Manning has insisted his only concern is the Broncos’ win-loss record. He wants desperately to gain home-field advantage and the top seed in the AFC playoffs again.

Manning finished Sunday’s game with a career-high 5,211 yards passing. He is 266 from surpassing the single-season record for yards passing set by Drew Brees in 2011.

Manning threw 37 touchdown passes last year, which broke a franchise record of 27 set by John Elway in 1997 and tied by Jake Plummer in 2004. (Photo: Associated Press)

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-KICKOFF COVERAGE’S: HISTORY OF THE 32 IN 32-

-NEW YORK GIANTS-

2007

GIANTS KEEP THE ‘72 DOLPHINS HAPPY AS THEY BEAT THE 18-0 PATRIOTS IN SUPERBOWL XLII:

2007 Playoffs: As the fifth seed the Giants road to the Super Bowl was away from Giants Stadium, and for them that was a good thing, as they had not lost on the road since Week 1, while they posted a 3-5 record at home on the way to a 10-6 record.

The Giants and Tampa Bay Buccaneers approached their Wild Card match up in different directions, as the Giants played the final week of the season to win, the Buccaneers played not to get hurt and rested many of their starters. In a battle of differing philosophies it appeared Coach Tom Coughlin’s decision to play hard the final week paid off, as the Bucs appeared out of sync, despite a Touchdown on the first possession.

The Bucs would not score again, until late in the fourth quarter as the Giants controlled the game and continued their road winning streak with a 24-14 win. The win set up a rematch with the Dallas Cowboys, at the site of the Week 1 loss. In the regular season the Cowboys had easily beaten the Giants twice, as the Giants defense seemed to have no answer for Tony Romo.

However, Romo found love since the Giants last played the Cowboys, and while the Giants were focused on football the Cowboys, almost laughing off the Giants as insignificant vacationed during their first round playoff bye, with Tony Romo taking a much publicized trip to Mexico with girlfriend Jessica Simpson.

From the start it was easy to tell that this game would be different for the Giants as their defense pressured Romo all day, as the game went into halftime tied 14-14, with Eli Manning connecting with Amani Toomer for two big touchdown passes; (a 52-yarder in the first quarter and a short four yard pass with seven seconds left in the first half).

In the second half the Giants defense got even tougher harassing and rushing Romo who had a disappointing game completing just 50% of his passes, while keeping Terrell Owens under control. The Giants battling defense would final get paid off, as Brandon Jacobs’ one yard Touchdown plunge gave them a 21-17 lead in the fourth quarter. From there it would be all defense as Romo attempted to lead a game winning Touchdown drive in the final minute, as R.W. McQuarters clinched victory for the Giants by stepping in front of Terry Glenn for an interception in the endzone.

The win sent the Giants to the NFC Championship Game where they faced the Green Bay Packers, and sub zero temperatures. However, it was not the Giants who looked cold on the Frozen Tundra of Lambeau Field it was the Packers as the Giants defense continued to pressure and harass Quarterbacks as they hit Brett Favre all day.

The lone blemish against the Giants defense came in the second quarter as they allowed Favre to find Donald Driver on a 90-yard Touchdown Pass, which gave the Packers a 10-6 halftime lead. In the second half the Giants would take control as they took the lead on another Touchdown plunge from Brandon Jacobs. After the Packers retook the lead the Giants recovered behind rookie Running Back Ahmed Bradshaw who had a chunk of his helmet chip off on a scoring drive that game the Giants a 20-17 lead. The Giants defense continued to harass Favre in the fourth quarter as he was picked off by R.W. McQuarters.

However, McQuarters during the run back fumbled the ball giving the Packers the ball back which allowed them to tie game 20-20. The Giants would have two chances to win the game before the end of regulation, but Lawrence Tynes missed two field goal attempts. However, the Giants defense continued to shutdown Brett Favre who appeared to be badly affected by the cold, while Eli Manning remained cool under pressure in the third coldest game in NFL history. One Giant who looked worst for ware as they game went to overtime was Coach Tom Coughlin whose face looked to be going through the early stages of frost bite.

Overtime would not last long as Corey Webster picked off Favre to set up a third try for Tynes, who made the third time a charm as the Giants advanced to Super Bowl XLII with a dramatic 47-yard Field Goal that won the game 23-20.

Super Bowl XLII: Once again the Giants stood in the way of history for the New England Patriots, who were attempting to join the 1972 Miami Dolphins as the only team to have a Perfect Season. For the 10-6 Giants it was as if they were just at the coronation for the team labeled by ESPN “The Greatest Football Team of All-Time.”

The Patriots had even trademarked the phrase 19-0. It was going to be cakewalk for the Patriots who entered the game as 12-point favorites. As for the Giants it had been a great run, Tom Coughlin had won over the team and his critics, Eli Manning had proven he was a good leader, and was not a bust, and Michael Strahan, who was playing in his final game had one more chance to win an elusive Super Bowl ring.

Much like the early days of September expectations were low for the Giants, as fans merely wanted a good showing, truly not expecting a win. However, the Giants had a secret in the Week 17 meeting they were able to find weaknesses in the Patriots stellar offense and entered the game with a quiet confidence as they arrived in Glendale, AZ wearing black as a funeral for the Patriots perfection.

The pressure was far from the Giants sideline, as they were playing with the house’s money. Getting the ball first the Giants took a page out of their Super Bowl XXV victory as they kept the Patriots offense off the field, holding the ball for the game’s first ten minutes. However, the Giants would only manage a 32-yard Field Goal by Lawrence Tynes.

The Pats would not take long to answer back scoring a Touchdown on their first possession as Laurence Maroney scored from one yard out on the first play of the second quarter. That would be the last points scored for the next two quarters as the Giants defense kept the team in the game by keeping the Patriots under wraps, by pressuring MVP Tom Brady like he had not been pressured all season.

The pressure came from all directions as Justin Tuck seemed to be on Brady’s back every play. In the fourth quarter the Giants offense began to find a grove as Eli Manning connected on a 45-yard pass to Rookie Tight End Kevin Boss, who established himself as a go to receiver during the playoff run, while playing for an injured Jeremy Shockey.

A few plays later Manning connected with David Tyree to give the Giants a 10-7 lead. As the playoffs continued to be filled with unsung heroes for the Giants, as it was the first Touchdown scored by Tyree all season. The Giants defense would continue their harassment of Tom Brady, but the Pats MVP who had won the Super Bowl three times, continued his dazzling fourth quarter career giving the Patriots 14-10 lead with 2:42 left in the game. The game and the season would rest in Eli Manning’s hand, as his brother Peyton Super Bowl XLI’s MVP watched, from the stands, it would be Eli’s time to prove all his critics wrong. The drive started slow for the Giants as Manning’s first two passes landed incomplete.

Needing a big play to keep the drive alive hit Amani Toomer to set up a fourth down and one play, which would be converted by Brandon Jacobs. After a five yard scramble and another incomplete pass the Giants faced another key third down at their own 44-yard line. The Patriots defense would bring the pressure and appeared to have Manning sacked, but Eli escaped and found David Tyree for a 32-yard pass into Patriots territory.

The escape from Eli Manning was amazing, but the catch itself was even more spectacular as Tyree battling All-Pro Rodney Harrison pinned the ball to the back of his helmet to make the competition. It was reviewed by the officials, and ruled a catch, as suddenly it seemed something special was in the air. However, time was short and the Giants still needed 24 yards to win the game. After misfires on the next two plays it was another third down pass this time to Rookie Steve Smith that kept the drive alive. The next play would bring pay dirt as Manning found Plaxico Burress who was playing injured in the end zone for a Touchdown that gave the Giants a 17-14 lead with 39 seconds remaining. With Brady needing to heave the ball down the field the Giants defense continued to apply the pressure throwing the NFL MVP who set a single season record for touchdown passes for a ten yard loss, as another Rookie Jay Alford broke up the middle.

With 19 seconds left the Pats now were stuck deep in their own territory as two prayers landed safely on the ground securing the Giants improbable Super Bowl win. For his clutch drive Eli Manning was named the Super Bowl MVP. Three days later the Giants returned to New York as they were given the ticker tape parade the city had refused to give them for their two other championships, while returning to the Meadowlands later that day to celebrate with their loyal fans in New Jersey, while somewhere in Miami the 1972 Dolphins popped champagne celebrating that they remained the only perfect team in NFL history.

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-WASHINGTON REDSKINS-

Nov. 27, 2007

Taylor Tragedy: Redskins Pro Bowl safety Sean Taylor dies one day after he is shot by an intruder in his Miami home. Taylor’s death devastates coaches and teammates. Meantime, fans create a memorial outside the Redskins Park facility honoring Taylor’s memory.

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-KICKOFF COVERAGE’S: HISTORY OF THE 32 IN 32-

-ST. LOUIS RAMS-

2000

The Rams win three playoff games in January, 49-37 over Minnesota in the NFC divisional round, Jan. 16, and 11-6 over Tampa Bay in the NFC Championship. Kurt’s Warner’s 31-yard pass to Ricky Proehl with 4:44 remaining brought the Rams from behind against Tampa Bay., Jan. 24. The Rams defeated Tennessee 23-16 in Super Bowl XXXIV at Atlanta on a 74-yard pass play, Warner to Isaac Bruce, with 1:54 remaining. The victory was not clinched until LB Mike Jones made a touchdown-saving tackle at the one-yard line on the last play, Jan. 31. Eight Rams, Warner, Marshall Faulk, Isaac Bruce, Orlando Pace, Kevin Carter, D'Marco Farr, Adam Timmerman, and Todd Lyght, are selected to the NFC Pro Bowl squad. Dick Vermeil retires and is replaced by assistant coach Mike Martz as head coach, Feb. 2.

The Rams tie for the NFC West title with 10-6 record but lose in first round of playoffs at New Orleans after a season in which two top players, QB Kurt Warner and RB Marshall Faulk, miss a combined total of eight games with injuries. Faulk scores 26 touchdowns in 14 games and is a unanimous choice for NFL Player of the Year. Warner, Faulk, Bruce and Pace are selected to the Pro Bowl. All but Pace withdrew because of the effects of injury. Torry Holt replaced Bruce and led the NFC with 7 catches for 123 yards and a touchdown.