khunrath

Heinrich Khunrath, Ampitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae (Hamburg, 1595). The figure of the hermaphrodite as a metaphor for the dualistic nature of the universe. The black peacock labelled “AZOTH” leads us deeper into Hermetic territory. Azoth was the hypothesized universal solvent, the “ultimate substance” which could transform all elements. Here it seems to be used to convey the union of male and female (and of all elements) which would allow the corporeal human form to transcend to a divine plane (note the symbol of the trinity above the peacock feathers, which resemble diagrams of the celestial spheres). Read more.

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Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, was discovered today in 1655!

These accompanying alchemical etchings are from the Amphitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae by Heinrich Khunrath, which was first published in Hamburg, Germany in 1595.  

"You should have and recognize all the residue of the whole of nature and the whole Macrocosmos, and the microcosm, and you yourself."  

"The First Stage of the Great Work," better-known as the "Alchemist’s Laboratory." The drawing of the laboratory is credited to architectural painter Hans Vredeman de Vries (1527–1604) and shows Heinrich Khunrath in his laboratory.

Khunrath’s encounters with John Dee and Thölde and Paracelsian beliefs led him to develop a Christianized natural magic, seeking to find the secret prima materia that would lead man into eternal wisdom. The Christianized view that Khunrath took was framed around his commitment to Lutheran theology. He also held that experience and observation were essential to practical alchemical research, as would a natural philosopher.

Alchemist’s Laboratory IN: ‘Amphitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae’ by Heinrich Khunrath, 1595.
[A]n alchemical classic, the best known of Heinrich Khunrath’s works. The work is infused with a strange combination of Christianity and magic, illustrated with elaborate, hand-colored, engraved plates heightened with gold and silver. The tension between spirituality and experiment, and the rich symbolism of Khunrath’s writings and their engravings brought condemnation of the book by the Sorbonne in 1625, and now attracts attention from scholars.”
О КНИГЕ:http://specialcollections.library.wisc.edu/khunrath/index.html

Just like mint and coral, rustic has been kind of a big deal lately (at least from what I’ve seen among LDS fellow brides). While I wouldn’t let Aunt Jen touch burlap with a ten-foot-pole for our wedding, it doesn’t mean it can’t be done well! It just depends on your theme. Anyway I think she snuck some in there and it looked totally great. :) These kraft invitations are ones I made for a good friend who saw some rustic invitations with an oak tree on Etsy, and wanted something similar. I found an oak tree off which to base the design under the public domain and added a cutout of the couple standing under the tree. The Temple insert includes a cutout of the Salt Lake Temple and another insert includes the couple’s website information with a heart-shaped QR code. 

Font choice: The script is Parisienne, a Google font. Apparently, it was inspired by a 1960’s brassiere ad! I love Google fonts and the licensing [not] involved! The other typeface here is Justus, a digitization by someone named Khunrath of a font originally created centuries ago by one of the founders of the “modern” didone typefaces. Says Khunrath:

"This typeface is a recreation of the font cut by Justus Erich Walbaum around 1800. Didone is a clean lines and fine lines. This is a free version available to everyone. In any case, credit should be kept in its original author: Justus Erich Walbaum. And since Mr. Walbaum died more than 100 years, the source can be regarded as public domain." 

I can’t find Khunrath’s website or figure out who he really is, so, thank you! Somehow, an 1800 Didone typeface + 1960’s bra ad script + kraft paper + oak tree = 2015 rustic themed wedding invite.

Πολύπλευρον και πολύπλοκον αναδύεται το πολυειδές μήνυμα του πλατωνικού “Παρμενίδου”. Ο Πλάτων εμφανίζει, κατά συγγνωστόν ετεροχρονισμόν, συνάντησιν του έφηβου Σωκράτους με τοη ηλικιωμένον Παρμενίδην, επισκέπτην εις Αθήνας των εορτών των Παναθηναίων.
Εν περιλήψει, η διαδρομή των περιλαμβανομένων εις τον συγκεκριμένον διάλογον, διέρχεται διά μέσου των αυστηρών μυστηριακών απαγορεύσεων, όσον αφορά εις την διασάφησιν των επί μέρους θέσεων, της ιεράς, διά τους Έλληνας μύστας, Ορφικοπυθαγορείου Παραδόσεως.
Περιληπτικώς, ο διάλογος “Παρμενίδης” εξελίσσεται ως μία τελικώς αντιπαράθεσις μεταξύ Ορφικοπυθαγορείου φιλοσοφικού κοσμολογικού δυισμού, - τον προσδιοριζόμενον εκ των δύο, εν προκειμένω Ορφικοπυθαγορείων φιλοσοφικών κοσμολογικών όρων “εν” και “πολλά” - , αφ’ ενός μεν και αφ’ ετέρου, Ελεατικού φιλοσοφικού κοσμολογικού μονισμού, ως προσδιορίζει τούτον η εκ μέρους του Παρμενίδου, τέκνου της Ελέας, υποστηριζομένη θέσις ότι, ο κόσμος δεν συνεκροτήθη, ούτε και συγκροτείται εκ δυο κοσμογονικών ουσιώνμ αλλ’ αντιθέτως, ότι ο κόσμος σύγκειται εκ μιας ουσίας, η οποία, ως “εν” συγκροτεί το υπο του Παρμενίδου προσδιοριζόμενον “εν”.
Λυπηρόν και περίεργον το γεγονός ότι ο Παρμενίδης απέκτησε τας πρώτας του - απορριφθείσας υπό του ιδίου κατόπιν - γνώσεις εκ του Πυθαγορείου Αμεινίου. Προφανώς ο Πυθαγορισμός, ως φιλοσοφικός κοσμολογικός δυισμός, δεν τον κατέκτησε.

Περί του Πλατωνικού Διαλόγου “Παρμενίδης”

ΣΠΥΡΟΔΗΜΟΥ Γ.ΑΝΕΜΟΓΙΆΝΝΗ - ΣΙΝΑΝΙΔΗ
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Κοσμολογική απεικόνιση του αλχημιστικού Έργου με τη μορφή του βολβού του οφθαλμού. Από την κόρη, το κοσμογονικό χάος των τεσσάρων στοιχείων, αναδύεται η σφαιρική λίθος, ο ανανεωμένος, μικρότερος κόσμος.Τα χέρια που τη σηκώνουν ψηλά είναι “τα δύο μείζονα μέρη του Έργου, η λύσις του σώματος (Solve) και η στερέωσις του πνεύματος (coagula).Κόκκινο και άσπρο νερό αναβλύζει από το rebis,τη διπλή όψη της ύλης,για να σχηματίσει το υαλώδες σώμα του κοσμικού οφθαλμού, τη θάλασσα του χωροχρόνου.
Το πτηνό συμβολίζει τις φάσεις του Έργου.Αποτελείται από κοράκι (αποσύνθεση), κύκνο (albedo), παπαγάλο (φάση των ζωηρών χρωμάτων) και φοίνικα (rubedo).

Στην περίπτωση αυτή η πυθαγόρεια τετρακτύς σχηματίζει το οπτικό νεύρο.

H. Khunrath,Amphitheatrum sapientiae aeternae, 1602

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Khunrath’s brushes with John Dee and Thölde and Paracelsian beliefs led him to develop a Christianized natural magic, seeking to find the secret prima materia that would lead man into eternal wisdom. The Christianized view that Khunrath took was framed around his commitment to Lutheran theology. He also held that experience and observation were essential to practical alchemical research, as would a natural philosopher.

His most famous work on alchemy is the Amphitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae (Amphitheater of Eternal Wisdom), a work on the mystical aspects of that art, which contains the oft-seen engraving entitled “The First Stage of the Great Work”, better-known as the “Alchemist’s Laboratory”. The book was first published at Hamburg in 1595, with four circular elaborate, hand-colored, engraved plates heightened with gold and silver which Khunrath designed and were engraved by Paullus van der Doort. The book was then made more widely available in an expanded edition with the addition of other plates published posthumously in Hanau in 1609. Amphitheatrum Sapientiae Aeternae is an alchemical classic, combining both Christianity and magic. In it, Khunrath showed himself to be an adept of spiritual alchemy and illustrated the many-staged and intricate path to spiritual perfection. Khunrath’s work was important in Lutheran circles.

source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinrich_Khunrath

"What good are torches, light or glasses if the people do not want to see?" Another one of my favorites. I really think this one speaks for itself, heavily and sadly symbolizing the majority of Earth’s population. From a book by Heinrich Khunrath, a German physician, philosopher and alchemist who lived from 1560 - 1605. #Alchemy #Symbolism #Occult #Magic #Theurgy #Mysticism #Theosophy #Rosicrucianism #Philosophy by inhocsignovinceslvx https://instagram.com/p/0bYtxqCNft/