keys in the house

Quick thoughts on Paige…

Depsite her never being my favorite, I am so happy for her.

Alberto Del Rio (aka fuck that guy) destroyed her mentally. It was such an abusive relationship, and she recoiled from everyone/everything she knew.

Her injury sidelined her for sure, but he was a major part of WWE wanting nothing to do with her for so long–since he was always whispering in her ear.

I truly hope she is done with him; and for good. I hope she thrives in life in every way possible because as a person, she deserves it.

Welcome back to your house, Paige.

We left a key under the mat.

Stanley’s Choice (Part 2)

A/N: This is my first ever imagine/fic series, so please don’t hate me if it’s really bad! Also, the Losers are aged up to about 16 years old. 

Pairing: Stan Uris x Reader (Romantic, kinda) + Richie Tozier x Reader (Platonic/Romantic-ish)

Warnings: not that i know of???

Summary: After staying friends for 3 years, the Losers’ Club all go to the Homecoming dance together. However, when you arrive, you’re surprised to find someone else with the boy you had been in love with since you were 13.


His hand wrapped around yours as he handed you that tape. How could he just pretend that everything was okay? That what he did - was doing - didn’t break your heart? That you could just pick up where you left - 

“I’m sorry,” he whispered. You wanted to look at him, but you couldn’t. The fear of him seeing you cry overcame you, and you just couldn’t. Without saying a word to him, you pulled your hand away shakily, and walked into your house. 

That night, you left your blinds open, hoping to maybe catch a glimpse of him in his room, reading, bird watching, things you used to do together through the windows. Maybe you could say what you wanted to then; pour your heart out. But all you saw was the faint glow of his lamp through those dark curtains you hated so much. 

“Y/N! Careful, you almost completely knocked me over!” Patricia said, waking you up from your thoughts. She was headed towards the table, probably going to ask Stan to slow dance with her. To your song. 

“Oh, shit, sorry, I just got a little distracted,” you murmured. Pretty much everyone was on the dance floor except Eddie and Stan. Beverly and Bill were in each other’s arms, Ben and Kay swayed awkwardly to the song, and even  Mike found someone to dance with. You looked for Richie, the one person you thought could save you from this situation, but you found him already sitting next to Eddie, deep into a conversation about something stupid, you were sure. 

Patricia followed your gaze. “You and Richie aren’t going to slow dance together? After all those songs, this is the one you aren’t going to dance to?” 

“Well, yeah,” you chuckled awkwardly. “We’re just friends. Really close friends.” 

“Oh.. Well, I’m trying to bring Stan over so we could dance. If only I could get to him! These people keep getting in the way,” she responded. Strangely, when she said it, you weren’t offended. You were certain if anyone else did, it would feel like a personal attack to you, but Patricia wasn’t that type of person. Maybe that’s why Stan asked her instead of you. “I told him to just meet me when a slow song comes along, since he didn’t want to dance to all those other songs, but you know Stan.” 

Not knowing how to respond, you just nodded. You both pushed through the tons of people standing between you and the table, and when you finally made it, the song ended. At least there was that. They weren’t going to be dancing to your song. 

“Damn it!” Patricia said in frustration. “You should’ve just met me on the dance floor.” 

“Next song, Patty,” Stan replied quietly. “I promise I’ll go for the next one.” 

The next slow song came eventually, and you looked on as Patricia whipped Stan away to the dance floor. You were watching them intently, but unconsciously, until Richie nudged you. “You need something to wipe that nasty ass drool off your chin?” 

“Shit, do you think they noticed?” you said nervously. 

He shook his head. Then made a face that almost looked like he was thinking. “Actually.. I don’t think Patricia noticed. Stan probably did. He notices every fucking thing about you. It’s annoying.” 

“Stop fucking around with me, Rich. I don’t like that shit.” He opened his mouth as if he wanted to say something but you cut him off. “No. We’re done talking about this.” 

Surprisingly, Richie didn’t argue. Throughout the rest of the dance, you and Richie just sat at your table in silence. 

When it was time to leave, you and Mike were deciding who to give rides to because you had all planned on going to your place, since your parents were gone for the weekend. 

“My car has 8 seats, so I can take 8 people,” you said. You could have technically taken everyone to your house, but Ben told you that he wanted to bring Kay along so the Losers could get to know her. 

“Well, who do you think is riding with you?” Mike asked.

While you and Mike were talking it over, you felt someone tapping your shoulder. When you turned around, you found yourself staring at Stan. “Y/N… I know I didn’t ask you guys ahead of time, but is it okay if Patty comes along too? She says her parents aren’t home and she’s too-” 

“Yeah. Sure. It’s fine,” you said, before turning back around. “Okay, so Bev, Bill, and Richie are riding with me then? Ben, Kay, Eddie, Patty, and Stan can ride with Mike.”

“Y/N, I don’t have enough seats. I only have room for four people in my car,” Mike said. You would have asked Eddie to ride with you, but you felt bad at the fact that Mike would be stuck in the car with couples. While you were trying to come up with what to do, you heard Patricia speak up.

“We’ll ride with you.” 

And so they did. The car ride to your house was filled with awkward tension. You shot Beverly the occasional nervous glance, had short, almost telepathic conversations, before focusing on driving again. When you got to your place, you parked in the driveway, but left just enough space for Mike, who arrived about a minute later. Richie knew where you kept your keys, so naturally, he was the first one in your house, and everyone followed after, leaving you and Beverly outside. 

“I know you like him, but how is this so awkward all of a sudden? I mean, it wasn’t like this yesterday, or last week, or anytime before that. Why is it so bad tonight?” she asked. 

The next morning, you decided you were going to finally tell him what was on your mind right before . You walked over to his house, you knocked, but as soon as he opened the door, you found yourself frozen. It’s as if the words drove you to this deserted island, then left you there stranded. 

“Y/N, hey-”

“Bill says he wants to hang out at the quarry today, do you wanna bike together?” you asked casually. On the way to the quarry, you talked to Stan about anything and everything - except for what you really wanted to talk about. You thought, when HE brings it up, that’s when I’ll say what I need to say, but each time he made an attempt to do so, you would shoot it down. Quickly. That’s how most of your interactions went after that day. The other times he would try to bring it up you would just ignore it. Eventually, he just stopped bringing it up, and you two just acted like nothing ever happened. 

Why were you such a coward? 


SORRY IF THIS IS BAD AGAIN!!!! LMK IF I SHOULD JUST KEEP DOING THIS or lIKE IF YOU WANT ME TO DO ANOTHER THING?? 

Ridiculous yet effective ways to deal with Executive Dysfunction

Dealing with executive dysfunction and ADHD becomes so much easier when you stop trying to do things the way you feel like you should be able to do them (like everyone else) and start finding ways that actually work for you, no matter how “silly” or “unnecessary” they seem.

For years my floor was constantly covered in laundry. Clean laundry got mixed in with dirty and I had to wash things twice, just making more work for myself. Now I just have 3 laundry bins: dirty (wash it later), clean (put it away later), and mystery (figure it out later). Sure, theoretically I could sort my clothes into dirty or clean as soon as I take them off and put them away straight out of the dryer, but realistically that’s never going to be a sustainable strategy for me.

How many garbage bins do you need in a bedroom? One? WRONG! The correct answer is one within arms reach at all times. Which for me is three. Because am I really going to get up to blow my nose when I’m hyperfocusing? NO. In allergy season I even have an empty kleenex box for “used tissues I can use again.” Kinda gross? Yeah. But less gross than a snowy winter landscape of dusty germs on my desk.

I used to be late all the time because I couldn’t find my house key. But it costs $2.50 and 3 minutes to copy a key, so now there’s one in my backpack, my purse, my gym bag, my wallet, my desk, and hanging on my door. Problem solved.

I’m like a ninja for getting pout the door past reminder notes without noticing. If I really don’t want to forget something, I make a physical barrier in front of my door. A sticky note is a lot easier to walk past than a two foot high cardboard box with my wallet on top of it.

Executive dysfunction is always going to cause challenges, but often half the struggle is trying to cope by pretending not to have executive dysfunction, instead of finding actual solutions.

3

Anonym schrieb an meru90 :can i suggest kagehinayachi with the haunted house meme since its halloween soon :^) !!???

i did more than u asked for dear anon but i had way too much fun (ref under cut)

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A YEAR WITHOUT A PRESIDENT

It seems like forever, but it was just one year ago that Donald Trump was elected president. So what have we learned about the presidency and who is running the country? 

1. The first big thing we’ve learned is that Trump is not really the president of the United States – because he’s not governing.

A president who’s governing doesn’t blast his Attorney General for doing his duty and recusing himself from an FBI investigation of the president.

A president who’s governing doesn’t leave the top echelons of departments and agencies empty for almost a year.

He doesn’t publicly tell his Secretary of State he’s wasting time trying to open relations with North Korea. Any president with the slightest interest in governing would already know and approve of what his Secretary of State was doing.

He doesn’t fire half his key White House staff in the first nine months, creating utter chaos.

A president who is governing works with his cabinet and staff to develop policy. He doesn’t just tweet new public policy out of the blue – for example, that transgender people can’t serve in the military. His Secretary of Defense is likely to have some thoughts on the matter – and if not consulted might decide to ignore the tweet.

He doesn’t just decide to withdraw from the Paris Accord without any reason or analysis.

A president who is governing works with Congress. He doesn’t just punt to Congress hard decisions – as he did with DACA, the Iran nuclear deal, insurance subsidies under the Affordable Care Act, and details of his tax plan.

He doesn’t tell a crowd of supporters that he’s ended the Clean Power Plan – “Did you see what I did to that? Boom, gone” – when any such repeal requires a legal process, and must then withstand court challenges.

Instead of governing, Donald Trump has been insulting, throwing tantrums, and getting even:

Equating white supremacists with people who protest against them. Questioning the patriotism of NFL players who are peacefully protesting police violence and racism.

Making nasty remarks about journalists, about his predecessor as president, his political opponent in the last election, national heroes like Congressman John Lewis and Senator John McCain, even the mayor of San Juan Puerto Rico.

Or he’s busy lying and then covering up the lies. Claiming he would have won the popular vote if millions hadn’t voted fraudulently for his opponent – without a shred of evidence to support his claim, and then setting up a fraudulent commission to find the evidence.

Or firing the head of the FBI who wouldn’t promise to be more loyal to him than to the American public.

A president’s job is to govern. Trump doesn’t know how to govern, or apparently doesn’t care. So, logically, he’s not President.

2. The second thing we’ve learned is that Trump’s influence is waning.  

Since he lost the popular vote, his approval ratings have dropped even further. One year in, Trump is the least popular president in history with only 37 percent of Americans behind him.

Most Republicans still approve of him, but that may not be for long.

He couldn’t get his pick elected to a Senate primary in Alabama, a state bulging with Trump voters.

Republican senators refused to go along with his repeal of the Affordable Care Act. And they’re taking increased interest in Russia’s interference in the 2016 election.

Business leaders deserted him over his remarks over Charlottesville. They vacated his business advisory councils.

NFL owners have turned on him over his remarks about players. Tom Brady, who once called Trump “a good friend,” now calls him “divisive” and “wrong.”

There’s no question he’s violated the Constitution. There are at least three grounds for impeachment – his violation of the emoluments clause of the Constitution by raking in money from foreign governments, his obstruction of justice by firing the head of the FBI, and his failure to faithfully execute the law by not implementing the Affordable Care Act. And a fourth if he or his aides colluded with Russia in the 2016 election.

But both houses of Congress would have to vote for his removal, which won’t happen unless Democrats win control in 2018 or Republicans in Congress decide Trump is a political liability.

3. The third big thing we’ve learned is where the governing of the country is actually occurring.

Much is being done by lobbyists for big business, who now swarm over the Trump administration like honey bees over a hedgerow of hollyhocks.

But the real leadership of America is coming from outside the Trump administration.

Leadership on the environment is now coming from California – whose rules every automaker and many other corporations have to meet in order to sell in a state that’s home to one out of eight Americans.

Leadership on civil rights is coming from the federal courts, which have struck down three different versions of Trump’s travel ban, told states their voter ID laws are unconstitutional, and pushed police departments to stop profiling and harassing minorities.

Leadership on the economy is coming from the Federal Reserve Board, whose decisions on interest rates are more important than ever now that the country lacks a fiscal policy guided by the White House.

Most of the rest of leadership in America is now coming from the grassroots – from people all over the country who are determined to reclaim our democracy and make the economy work for the many rather than the few.

They stopped Congress from repealing the Affordable Care Act.

They’re fighting Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’s plan to spend taxpayer money on for-profit schools and colleges that cheat their students.

They’re fighting EPA director Scott Pruitt’s crusade against climate science.

And Attorney General Jeff Sessions’s attempts to tear down the wall between church and state.

They’re fighting against the biggest tax cut for the wealthy in American history – that will be paid for by draconian cuts in services and dangerous levels of federal debt.

They’re fighting against the bigotry, racism, and xenophobia that Trump has unleashed.

And they’re fighting for a Congress that, starting with next year’s midterm elections, will reverse everything Trump is doing to America.

But their most important effort – your effort, our effort – is not just resisting Trump. It’s laying the groundwork for a new politics in America, a new era of decency and social justice, a reassertion of the common good.

Millions are already mobilizing and organizing. It’s the one good thing that’s happened since Election Day last year – the silver lining on the dark Trump cloud.

If you’re not yet part of it, join up.

When Andrew got the Maserati to replace the car that the Ravens fans trashed, he didn’t put Nicky on the insurance policy or give him a key. Neil paid for part of the car. Andrew and Neil bought a car together. They weren’t even hooking up yet.

  • Izuku: Bad News - Uraraka locked her keys inside her house.
  • Izuku: Good News - We didn’t have to wait around for a locksmith.
  • Izuku: Bad News - Uraraka finds it very concerning that I know how to pick locks, and tried to unlock my Tragic Backstory™. I was too embarrassed to admit that the reason I learned was because, at thirteen, I figured that was the kind of skill that would impress hot people.
  • Izuku: Good News - A hot person saw me do it.
  • Izuku: Bad News - It was Todoroki, and since he’s already seen me fall out of several trees, cry because I saw a fawn that was just too damn small, and knows I can ride a unicycle, he’ll never think I’m cool no matter what I do. It’s too late. He knows