kenyan designers

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Some progress on Dracula’s bioactive set up. Gonna leave the plants to get a good head start and make sure the soil is draining nicely and stuff before I introduce him.  The big rocks are in contact with the drainage layer to make sure he can’t burrow under them and get himself squished somehow, terrarium is lit with an Arcadia jungle dawn LED- heard really good things about these for promoting plant growth.   

End of Mitumba (second Hand) Clothing in Kenya

(Photo: personal.psu.edu)

For those who don’t have a lot of money to splurge on expensive clothes and shoes, they always come in very handy as they are affordable. For those who love some unique style, they come in a variety of unique pieces. For those who love fashion, they are very chic -in fact the only way you can ever get the chance to rock an International designer outfit or shoes that you would normally NOT be able to afford…they are IT! Yes…I’m talking about second hand clothes and shoes also famously known as ‘mitumbas‘.

These could very soon be non-existent. Why?…

Second hand clothing and shoes will be banned from entering the country should proposals in an industrialization bill go through come January next year.

The Bill, which has already been approved by Cabinet and now before Parliament, is meant to protect the textile and leather industries.

Industrialisation Permanent Secretary Karanja Kibicho says this is a move by government to create a market for local traders and manufacturers.

“These are used clothes meant to help the poor but are used as a trading tool. We are trying to strengthen the issue of counterfeit and standards especially at the points of entry. We know it is a tall order because the players are not small guys,” he said.

When you look at all the benefits of second hand clothes bring with them and not forgetting the fact that they are a source of employment to thousands….Would you survive without your mitumba clothes and shoes?

The second-hand clothes market popularly known as ‘mitumba’ employs thousands of people most of whom consist of the youth.

The Sessional Paper, which has already been approved by the Cabinet and now before Parliament, is meant to protect the textile and leather industries. Industrialisation Permanent Secretary Karanja Kibicho says this is a move by government to create a market for local traders and manufacturers.

“These are used clothes meant to help the poor but are used as a trading tool. We are trying to strengthen the issue of counterfeit and standards especially at the points of entry. We know it is a tall order because the players are not small guys,” he said.

In his Budget Policy Statement in June, Finance Minister Njeru Githae directed the Kenya Revenue Authority to revert to the lower charge per container of imported second hand clothes to Sh1.1 million on a 20-foot container. The second-hand clothes market popularly known as ‘mitumba’ employs thousands of people most of whom are youths. The industrialisation policy also seeks to ban the export of leather and place a two percent levy on imported leather products, clothes and shoes that will go to supporting local traders.