kelley joe

The Signs as Iconic Deadpool Quotes

These were actually in a comic book.

“Deadpool” [Yellow Box]  (White Box)  “other”

Aries: (This plan that we’re working on..)  [What plan?]  “Operation moves.” (..Yeah. It’s awfully risky.)  [There’s a plan? Why wasn’t I-]  “Need-to-know basis. Sorry, pal.”  [But.. I’m you! That’s- that’s just stupid!]

Taurus: “Spidey! What up, baby boy? Haven’t seen you since Amazing Spider-Man #611!”

Gemini: “Let’s see how you like it when I smack you with an interspatial disorter that will temporarily phase your brain into dimension X!”  “This is an iPod with a piece of masking tape attached to it.”  “It is. Ah, but for a second there, you were really worried!”

Cancer: “Like Han Solo said to Chewbacca in Return of the Jedi, ‘Fly casual.’“ “Actually, I like the three new films better. The special effects are fantastic, and Hayden Christensen is an amazing actor.”  {shoots cronie} {points gun at other cronie} “Say Jar Jar Binks is an abomination! Say it!”  “Jar Jar Binks is an abomination! Jar Jar Binks is an abomination!”

Leo: “So, kick back, and enjoy Deadpool issue thirty-three point one!” [Wait, why is it called “point one”?]  (Who cares? At least this issue, there is a point.)

Virgo: “Why did you that?”  “Because you were gonna do it, and this is my book.” 

Libra: “Well, it’s in the Yellow Pages. You can’t get much realer than that!”  [I’m confused. I thought you couldn’t read anything in dreams.]  (I’m impressed he can read when he’s awake.)

Scorpio: “Oh, hi, kids. Deadpool here. Hate to interrupt the story like this, but our fine artist had the overwhelming urge to draw me in this pin-up shot, even though it’s nowhere in the script. Let’s return to the story while I go teach Michelangelo there the error of his ways.”

Sagittarius: “Is that Richard Nixon?”  “I can’t wait to pound that Dick… Uh. Hey, Doc, do you have a spell to undo what I just said?”

Capricorn: “I only have half a brain!” [be the meat] “What was that?!” (The other half. Ignore it.)

Aquarius: “Yeah, that fight lasted as long as Deathlok’s last comic.”

Pisces: “It’s funny.. I came here with starry-eyed dreams of killing some X-Babies. But now all I can think of is that damn Spider-Man.”

3

THIS SHOW IS SO IMPORTANT.

I know that stupid phrasing gets thrown around often; usually to the chagrin of the word important. But this show truly was important.

It was Janurary of 1972, and a little show named Emergency! made it’s debut on NBC. Created by the masterminds of Jack Webb (Adam-12, Dragnet, Mark VII Limited), and Robert Cinader, the show followed the lives of firemen/paramedics John Gage and Roy DeSoto on their adventures through LA County in Squad 51. The show ran until May 28th of 1977, with six television movies to it’s credit.

To the layman, this seems unimportant. But let me give you an idea of how much this show did for the US. Let’s say, for a moment, that you lived in a small community somewhere in the Midwest in the 1970’s. One day, you’re at home with mum when she suddenly has a heart attack. Right there, in front of you. First and foremost, the general populace at large doesn’t know the signs of a heart attack. In this timeframe, medicine was only something you really considered when you saw your doctor for your physical. It was still somewhat taboo to really talk about injuries and the like. Regardless, you’ve at least witnessed dear old mum pass out, and you call 9-1-1 instinctively. You reach an emergency dispatcher and tell them your mother’s fainted, and you need help immediately. You’ll get that help, right?

Wrong. The dispatcher gives you the number to a company that will send you an ambulance: a private, for-hire company. And when that ambulance arrives? They will likely do very little life-saving interventions for your loved one. In that timeframe, you really didn’t even need first-aid to get on an ambulance; just a really nice set of white clothes and a hearse or a dedicated unit to put lights on and go woo-woo. You did very little in the back to help that patient, other than watch them and reassure them that you’d be at the hospital…soon.

The ambulance that you take for granted now was nothing like the ambulances of 40 years ago. We have evolved as EMS providers; we are able to actually save lives. This show followed only 1 of 10 (that’s right TEN) paramedic/EMS services working in the United States. Let me repeat that: ONE OF TEN SERVICES THAT ACTUALLY HAD EMS IN THE UNITED STATES. This show, which ran a new episode roughly once a month for six years, actually showcased the good that these services were doing. It brought national recognition to the need for better equipped EMS services.

The show also was accredited for being the first show to demonstrate real CPR to the United States; something that was still in it’s infancy, and which we now stress is a necessary way to save someone’s life the sooner they get it when they need it. In the show, you’ll see times when people literally are confused as to why a fire unit shows up to their home, and even tell Johnny and Roy that they don’t need firemen, they need a doctor. Now, we simply call 9-1-1 and when the ambulance shows up, trust blindly that they’ll help.

THIS SHOW WAS SO IMPORTANT. It was the start of America’s recognition into Emergency Medical Services. It was a turning point in the country to demonstrate that early, life-saving interventions could help people in their time of need; the self-same services that are simply taken for granted now.

And the show didn’t just do fire and EMS, either! It showed what it’s truly like to work in a hospital. The show also followed nurse Dixie McCall, doctor Kelley Brackett, and doctor Joe Early after the paramedic duo would bring them a patient. Yes, like most shows of the era, it was very melodramatic…but it did showcase what most of your EMS and hospital providers (and to a lesser extent, firemen) go through on their tours of duty.

The next time you’re bored, I highly stress you to watch this show. Remember the reasons that persons like myself are on ambulances, accepting crappy pay and little recognition. See why we put ourselves in a little slice of hell and remember that we’re not all douchebags.

Thank you.

Joseph Louis Barrow (May 13, 1914 – April 12, 1981), better known as Joe Louis, was an American professional boxer and the World Heavyqeight Champion from 1937 to 1949. He is considered to be one of the greatest heavyweights of all time. Nicknamed the Brown Bomber, Louis helped elevate boxing from a nadir in popularity in the post-Jack Dempsey era by establishing a reputation as an honest, hardworking fighter at a time when the sport was dominated by gambling interests

Joseph Jefferson Jackson (July 16, 1887 – December 5, 1951), nicknamed “Shoeless Joe”, was an American outfielder who played Major League Baseball in the early part of the 20th century. He is remembered for his performance on the field and for his alleged association with the Black Sox Scandal, in which members of the 1919 Chicago White Sox participated in a conspiracy to fix the World Series. As a result of Jackson’s association with the scandal, Kenesaw Mountain Landis, Major League Baseball’s first commissioner, banned Jackson from playing after the 1920 season. Since then, Jackson’s guilt has been disputed, and his expulsion from baseball during the prime of his career made him one of the game’s legendary figures.