keatinge's

All right, it’s Misfit Appreciation Day 2017, and we’re finally at the 1990s for the entry here.

When a lot of people talk about the 1990s, it’s usually with scorn, often making accusations of every comic being loaded with over-muscled men, women with impossible body types, pupil-less eyes, shoulder pads, big knives and bigger guns. And I’m here to tell you that’s like assuming you know what the 1970s was like because you watched a bunch of blackploitation movies. While there were a ton of bad books, there were plenty of awesome and amazing books from that decade. Just off the top of my mind, Kingdom Come, Mike Allred’s Madman (as well as his series Red Rocket 7), League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Hellboy, Preacher, Sandman Mystery Theatre, Johnny the Homicidal Maniac… I wanna count Maus in there, but I can’t remember if it started in the early 90s or late 80s and I’m too lazy to do a Google search. And honestly… Whether they were great books or not, the Knightfall and Death of Superman stories were a LOT of fun to read. The Birds of Prey started around this time as well. Valiant’s Unity Crossover early on was amazing to read at that time… And that’s just the stuff I remember off the top of my mind. And there were a ton of comics that started off questionable that turned into something amazing. Witchblade turned into Switch (which I’m still waiting on issue #5, Stjepan Sejic!) Glory, which was kinda crappy turned into the amazing comic by Joe Keatinge. And then there’s Prophet… Which is all sorts of amazing, considering how bad that book was.

The 90s gave us some pretty amazing things. Yeah, there still was rampant sexism and stupid violence. But there was some very great comics and ideas that still influence very positive things to this day in comics.

Such as the Batman Adventures, and a special one-shot it had that, for me, is the greatest comic of all time: Batman: Mad Love

The use of shading and strong line work. Story panel layouts and “camera work”. Strong dialogue and even stronger storytelling. Characterization so developed that even if you didn’t watch the show, you knew what was going on and who the characters were. We all know how great the show was, but this was the first time i’ve seen a comic book fully make me feel like I was reading an episode of the series. (So much so that I actually prefer the comic book to the episode!) That book was THE most influential comic to me EVER. I would probably have given up being a cartoonist long ago, if not for that book. It’s probably more responsible for me being the artist I am, more than anything else.

So it’s only fitting that Misfit’s entry into the 1990s be based on the comic book series that created… Well… Created me. :)

   “There are worlds beyond our own. Worlds where a time traveler wanders through a metropolis devastated by an assassination across space-time. Timelines quake as the brilliant scientist’s warning goes unheeded. Affecting all who lived, live, or were ever meant to. Even the godlike, even the angelic. These ripples cross through endless possibilities, on infinite earths.”

RINGSIDE #12

STORY: JOE KEATINGE
ART: NICK BARBER & SIMON GOUGH
COVER: IBRAHIM MOUSTAFA
SEPTEMBER 27 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $3.99
“SHOOT,” Part Two
The Minotaur has risen again. Daniel Knossos is torn between saving the love he once lost and the future he’s long desired.

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TECH JACKET #2 – drawn by kharyrandolph, colored by Dave McCaig, lettered by Rus Wooten and written by this dude typing this right here is now out in comic book stores today courtesy of imagecomics’ Skybound.

Listen, this book is largely Khary drawing a bunch of cool shit in space. That’s well worth the price of admission alone.

After being beaten for wearing a dress, this queer man fought back with an empowering fashion shoot

25-year-old Isaac Keatinge, who identifies as queer, was wearing a dress and walking in the Newtown neighborhood of Sydney, Australia, in April when he was verbally and physically attacked by three men. Now, Keating is taking back the power with a photoshoot in the Australian magazine Heaps Gay. He also spoke to the magazine about his community’s response to the attack and why he’s hopeful for the future. (Warning: Graphic photo)

RINGSIDE #11

STORY: JOE KEATINGE
ART / COVER: NICK BARBER & SIMON GOUGH
AUGUST 30 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $3.99
NEW STORY ARC. “SHOOT,” Part One. The critically acclaimed ensemble drama interweaving the bombastic world of professional wrestling, the lives of those broken by it, and the gritty underworld cashing in on their demise returns for its third act. Retired veteran wrestler Daniel Knossos has seemingly turned against the one person he’s ever loved. Up-and-coming wrestler Reynolds loses everything before he ever had it. And just when everything seems to be at its worst, the Minotaur returns.

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Coming MARCH 2016 from Image Comics!

RINGSIDE #5
STORY: JOE KEATINGE
ART / COVER: NICK BARBER & SIMON GOUGH
MARCH 23 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $3.99
END OF STORY ARC
Our first arc comes to its brutal, bloody end.
RINGSIDE WILL RETURN JUNE 2016 

SHUTTER #19
STORY: JOE KEATINGE
ART / COVER: LEILA DEL DUCA & OWEN GIENI
MARCH 9 / 32 PAGES / FC / M / $3.99
“ALL ROADS” Part Two
The Kristopher siblings’ secret past threatens their present.

RINGSIDE is yet another over-sized cover-to-cover comic book, much like issue one. It wasn’t the initial plan, but it’s working out well. Nick’s already doing the best work of his run thus far on an issue which reveals a whole lot about ole Dan Knossos, further setting up the rest of the series in the process.

SHUTTER features the series’ most experimental structure to date, which is saying something. Three different narratives play out all at once – set across decades – all revealing things about the other, all playing off each other. It can be read in almost any order, but I advise to just read it from beginning to end, then go back however you want to catch all the criss-crossing. Some of the series’ biggest reveals are in this issue, but you need to dig in for them.

More to come.

Sketch of Kate Kristopher from Joe Keatinge and Leila Del Duca’s new image book, Shutter!

Man, I’ve been too busy lately, and it’s been too long since I took a break to draw something just for fun. I read the first issue of Shutter this morning and it’s pretty badass. You should read it. I’ve heard it’s sold out at the distributor level, so you can wait for a second printing, or buy it on Comixology!