kathryn howard

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I am not too sure if this has been done before, but here is a book series based on the wives of Henry VIII. I really love these covers as you can tell how much effort the artist has put into them. 

Firstly, we have have the accurate Tudor fashion in the style that the individual wives favoured most and the startling likeness that each lady has to her portrait. 

Secondly, the artist has taken into consideration the image of Henry as we see him gradually age as he moves onto another wife - we see him first as a young, viral man at the beginning of the series to the old, lecher that he became. 

The only thing I would suggest that would have been a great detail would have been to lose the beard when he was married to Anne Boleyn as she detested beards and made Henry shave it off, which was why he (like the petulant child he was) grew it back after her execution and refused to shave it off, possibly to spit her. It also would have been better to make him slightly skinnier whist being with Jane and Anne Boleyn as he only gained weight after Jane died, but then the one with Anne might just be his jacket bulking him up. Another good detail would have been to make Anna von Cleves blonde, instead of light brown, but other than that the depiction of the Tudor King is spot on.

Lastly, I really liked the fact that you had the prominent wife in his life at that particular moment next to him, while the other wives waiting patiently in the shadows for Henry to take notice of them and the fact that those wives are dressed in the fashion of the prominent wife, which I think is a good idea as the Queen would have been the one to lead the fashion that her ladies would follow and then when you see the “shadow” wives feathered in their books, they are dressed in their own favoured fashion.

All in all, a really thoughtful cover design and I only wish that novels now a days would take the time and add the details that really pull the story together, I mean sometimes you can see historical novels, but the woman is wearing the wrong style of fashion for that time period the book is featured in. 

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♔ Q U E E N S and Q U E E N  C O N S O R T S during the Tudor Era.

  • Elizabeth of York (1466-1503) - “Humble and Reverent”.
  • Katherine of Aragon (1485-1536) - “Humble and Loyal”.
  • Anne Boleyn (c.1501-1536) - “The Most Happy”.
  • Jane Seymour (c.1508-1537) - “Bound to Obey and Serve”.
  • Anne of Cleves (1515-1557) - “God Send Me Well to Keep”.
  • Kathryn Howard (c.1521-1542) - “No Other Will But His”.
  • Catherine Parr (1512-1548) - “To Be Useful in All That I Do”.
  • Lady Jane Grey (1537-1554) - According to My Power”.
  • Mary Tudor/Mary I (1516-1558) - “Truth, the Daughter of Time”.
  • Elizabeth Tudor/Elizabeth I (1533-1603) - “Always the Same”.
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Catherine conformed to general contemporary ideals of beauty, which praised women who had “moistness of complexion; and [are] tender, small, pliant and fair of disposition of body.” Contrary to the still-repeated tradition that she was “small, plump and vivacious,” the few surviving specifics about Catherine’s appearance describe her as short and slender. A former courtier subsequently described her as “flourishing in youth, with beauty fresh and pure.”

Young and Damned and Fair: The Life of Catherine Howard, Fifth Wife of King Henry VIII - Gareth Russell

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Today in history - The execution of Kathryn Howard

On 13 February 1542 Kathryn Howard -the fifth consort of Henry VIII and cousin of his second consort Anne Boleyn who also faced the same end- was executed  grounds of treason for committing adultery.  The night before her execution, Catherine is believed to have spent many hours practising how to lay her head upon the block, which had been brought to her at her request.She died with relative composure, but looked pale and terrified, she required assistance to climb the scaffold. She made a speech describing her punishment as “worthy and just” and asked for mercy for her family and prayers for her soul. According to popular folklore, her final words were, “I die a Queen, but I would rather have died the wife of Culpeper”. Catherine was beheaded with a single stroke of the executioner’s axe.Jane Boleyn, Viscountess Rochford, was executed immediately thereafter on Tower Green. Both their bodies were buried in an unmarked grave in the nearby chapel of St. Peter ad Vincula, where the bodies of Catherine’s cousins, Anne and George Boleyn, also lay. Other cousins were also in the crowd, including the Earl of Surrey. Henry did not attend. Catherine’s body was not one of those identified during restorations of the chapel during Queen Victoria’s reign. She is commemorated on a plaque on the west wall dedicated to all those who died in the Tower.Upon hearing news of Catherine’s execution, Francis I of France wrote a letter to Henry, regretting the “lewd and naughty [evil] behaviour of the Queen” and advising him that “the lightness of women cannot bend the honour of men”


listen here

One of Anne’s maids of honour was a very beautiful girl of about eighteen, Katharine, the orphan daughter of Lord Edmund Howard, brother of the Duke of Norfolk, and consequently first cousin of Anne Boleyn. During the first months of his unsatisfying union with Anne, Henry’s eyes must have been cast covetously upon Katharine; for in April 1540 she received a grant from him of a certain felon’s property, and in the following month twenty-three quilts of quilted sarsnet were given to her out of the royal wardrobe.

The Wives of Henry the Eighth and the Parts They Played in History - Martin Hume

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Katherine of Aragon | Anne Boleyn | Jane Seymour | Anne of Cleves | Kathryn Howard | Catherine Parr  | fancast