karen-jacobs

This is How Sargent Choice Rolls (Sushi)!

By Bianca Tamburello, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

Sargent Choice Vegetarian Brown Rice Sushi was back by popular demand at Karen Jacob’s test kitchen last week!  At previous test kitchen nights, I was often told that this is the most awaited recipe of the semester and a SC favorite.

Sargent Choice is lucky enough to have their own sushi expert, Karen Jacobs, who revealed her secrets to assembling the perfect roll. Sushi is a recipe that I have always intended on trying in my own kitchen, but I must admit, the rolling and raw fish intimidated me.

Before arriving at the test kitchen, I had already convinced myself that my sushi roll would fall apart and I would walk all the way back to my dorm as a sad sushi-less college student. But I actually did it: I successfully rolled my own sushi roll on my first try!

I know that I’m not the only cook who has shied away from making her own sushi in the past, so I’m going to bust some common myths right now:

Myth #1: Sushi rolling mats are essential for sushi rolling.

Sushi rolling mats are wonderful tools for rolling, but they are NOT essential for sushi making.  Use the nori sheets as both an ingredient and a rolling mat. As we demonstrated at the test kitchen, spread the rice on the end of the nori, pile your vegetables on top and start to roll. Using this technique, the nori will surround the rice and hold the vegetables together.

However, if you prefer the rice on the outside of the roll and the nori on the inside, you may consider buying a sushi mat.

Myth #2: Brown rice is not sticky enough to hold sushi rolls together.

I must admit I have bought brown rice sushi that fell apart because the brown rice was not sticky enough.  Karen Jacobs advises that the right amount of rice vinegar is the key for proper adherence, regardless of the type of rice. As directed in the recipe below, 2 tablespoons of rice vinegar for every 2/3rds of brown rice makes the brown rice just as sticky as white rice.

Myth #3: Sushi making ingredients are expensive.

This is where being a vegetarian for a night is very advantageous. Making vegetarian sushi instead of the traditional fish sushi cuts down on costs and relieves the pressure of finding an often-expensive, trust-worthy fish market. So save yourself the money and worry by packing your sushi with fresh vegetables and tofu, believe me you will not be disappointed!

First, we cooked the brown rice according to the directions on the package. As you may notice from the pictures, we did not add soy sauce to our brown rice. Soy sauce can be added by preference and is not necessary for proper binding of the rice. However, the rice vinegar is very important for the binding and the secret to neatly rolled sushi, so be sure not to skimp on the rice vinegar. The rice was transferred to another bowl where it was cooled and tossed occasionally.

Another trick to avoid the unraveling of your sushi roll is periodically dabbing your fingers with water and moistening the ends of the nori. Once the rice was prepared, we dabbed our fingers in a small cup of water and carefully spread out about 1 ¾-inch border of brown rice onto the nori. Next, we added the cucumbers, carrots, avocado slices, tofu and sprouts.

Everyone has different preferences for vegetables, so feel free to get creative! There is virtually no vegetable that cannot be rolled into a sushi roll. We even tested making sweet potato sushi at the test kitchen. We found that the sweet potato gave the roll a perfect hint of sweetness.

Finally, we dabbed the bare side of the nori with water and rolled the rice and vegetable end of the nori toward the opposite end, as we firmly held the filling in place. At the end of the roll, we dabbed the ends of the nori once again to seal the roll. We let the sushi sit for about 5 minutes, dampened a knife with water and then cut each roll into 6 pieces.

Sushi is not only delicious, but makes for a fun activity to do with friends and neighbors. Try hosting a sushi-making night and make it a competition as to who can make the most creative roll.

Sargent Choice Vegetarian Brown Rice Sushi

Yield 2 servings, 6 rolls each

Ingredients

2/3 cup dry short-grain brown rice
1-cup water
1-teaspoon water
2 teaspoons light soy sauce
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
1-teaspoon wasabi powder
2 (8 ¼ by 7 ¼ -inch) sheets roasted nori (dried layer)
½ Kirby cucumber, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/16-inch thick matchsticks
½ medium carrot, cut into 1/16-inch-thick matchsticks
½ small California avocado, peeled and cut into thin slices
¾ ounces radish sprouts, roots trimmed
6 ounces firm tofu, cut into several long pieces

Directions

1.       Prepare brown rice as directed with 1 teaspoon soy sauce

2.       While rice is standing, stir together vinegar and remaining teaspoon soy sauce

3.       Transfer rice to a wide, nonmetal bowl and sprinkle with vinegar mixture. Toss gently with a large spoon to combine. Cool rice, tossing occasionally, for about 15 minutes.

4.       Stir together wasabi and teaspoon of water to form a stiff paste. Let stand for at least 15 minutes to allow flavors to develop.

5.       Arrange 1 sheet of nori shiny-side down on a sushi mat lengthwise. With damp fingers, gently press half the rice onto the nori with a 1 ¾-inch border on the farthest edge.

6.       Starting 1-inch from the side nearest you, arrange half the cucumber matchsticks, carrot matchsticks, avocado slices, and tofu pieces in an even strip horizontally across the rice (You may need to cut pieces to fit). Repeat with half the radish sprouts, letting some sprout tops to extend beyond the edge.

7.       Roll the bottom edge of mat toward the top edge while holding the filling in place and pressing firmly to seal roll. Let stand for 5 minutes with the seam down and cut crosswise into 6 pieces with a wet knife.

8.       Repeat steps 5-7 with the second sheet of nori.

1 Serving Calories 250 Fat 10 g Saturated Fat 1.5 g Protein 12 g Carbohydrates 28 g Fiber 6 g

Snack Time: Spicy Roasted Chickpeas, Edamame Hummus, and Home-Made Pita Chips

By Bianca Tamburello, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

At the most recent SC KJ Test Kitchen, we made our own Edamame Hummus along with Spicy Roasted Chickpeas and Home-made Pita Chips. Hummus and pita bread is one of my favorite healthy snacks. I always keep some in my microfridge at school and also at home. I’ll often smear some hummus on a slice of pita for a quick to-go snack or store it in a small container to throw in my bag.

The edamame hummus was a nice change from the more common chickpea hummus. Although this delicious snack combination has three parts, each step is quite easy!

Spicy Roasted Chickpeas

We simply strained the chickpeas, tossed them with olive oil and roasted them in the oven. After they cooled, we seasoned them to our liking with salt, pepper and cumin.

Edamame Hummus

We blended the edamame, tofu, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice in the food processor until smooth. Again, we seasoned to taste.

Spiced Pita Chips

First, we prepared vinaigrette of olive oil, cumin, coriander, pepper and salt. Then, we cut the pita bread into smaller chip-size pieces and tossed them in the vinaigrette. Next, we spread them onto a pan and toasted them in the oven.

The toasty seasoned pita chips were seasoned to perfection and were wonderful for scooping the edamame hummus and piling a few roasted chickpeas on top.

My favorite part of this snack trio is the edamame hummus. The blended silken tofu and edamame loads this hummus with protein that will keep you fuller longer.

The edamame hummus had a smooth thick texture similar to the consistency of a dip rather than the texture of chickpea hummus. The pita and hummus was a wonderful combination but I am also excited to make my own batch to pair with carrots and celery!

Snack Night: Spicy Roasted Chickpeas, Edamame Hummus, and Home-made Pita Chips

Spicy Roasted Chickpeas:

15-ounce chickpeas, canned
1 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp chunky sea salt
2 tsp garam masala spice (or similar spice)

Directions:

1.Heat the oven to 400 degrees F.

2.Pour the chickpeas into a colander and drain and rinse well under running water.

3.Toss the chickpeas with olive oil and spread on a large cookie sheet.

4.Roast for 30-40 minutes or until brown and crispy.

5.Be sure to turn and stir every ten minutes so they do not burn

Edamame Hummus:

2 cups shelled edamame, cooked (frozen or fresh)
1 cup silken tofu, drained
½ teaspoon salt, adjust to taste
Pinch of white pepper, adjust to taste
1 ½ teaspoons ground cumin
3 cloves garlic, minced (about 1 tbsp)
¼ cup olive oil
1/3 cup fresh lemon juice

Directions:

1. Set 1 Tbs of the edamame aside for garnish.

2. Place the rest of the edamame along with the tofu, salt, pepper, cumin, garlic, oil, and lemon juice, in a food processor and process until very smooth, about 2 minutes.

3. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Refrigerate and serve with spiced pita chips. Garnish with reserved edamame and a sprinkle of cumin.

Spiced Pita Chips:

¼ cup olive oil
2 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
½ tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp garlic powder
½ tsp freshly ground black pepper
½ tsp salt
6 whole wheat pita breads, but into 8 wedges each

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

2. Combine the oil and spices in a large bowl.

3. Add the pita wedges and toss to coat

4. Spread the wedges in a single layer on two baking sheets and bake, tossing once until the pitas are brown and crisp, about 15 minutes. Let cool completely before serving.

Show Me the Latkes!

By Bianca Tamburello, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

The fear of finals along with excitement for winter break rolled into Karen Jacobs’ Sargent Choice Test Kitchen this week.

I was so excited to celebrate my first Hanukah with Karen and my second family at the test kitchen. In honor of the celebration, Karen taught us how to make her family latke recipe.  The first bite of the crispy fried potato pancakes persuaded me to add this recipe to my own holiday recipe book.

Food plays a large role in holiday tradition and without it holidays would not be the same. Although family recipes are not always the healthiest choices at family gatherings, altered recipes can lose their sentimental value. However, this doesn’t mean there isn’t room to start new family traditions based around healthier recipes. Whether you celebrate Hanukah, or just like the taste of latkes, Sargent Choice has created a healthier version that would make a great addition to your holiday traditions!

I hope you enjoy this Sargent Choice latke recipe made with sweet potatoes!

Happy holidays and have a relaxing break!

Sargent Choice Sweet Potato Latke

Yield 4 servings

 

Ingredients  

4 medium sweet potatoes peeled and grated
1 cup minced onion
4 eggs, lightly beaten
½ cup whole grain matzo meal or whole wheat flour
4 tablespoons light olive oil
¼ teaspoon pepper
1/8 teaspoon salt
2 cups unsweetened applesauce, as garnish

 

Directions

1. Combine grated sweet potatoes, onion, pepper, and eggs. Stir well to combine.

2. Add whole grain matzo meal or whole wheat flour and mix again. Note: Only add enough to make a batter; the mixture should not be too dry or stiff.

3. Heat half the light olive oil over medium-high heat in a large, heavy-bottomed skillet. Drop large spoonfuls of the batter into the skillet, pressing gently with a spatula to flatten each latke. Each latke should be approximately ½ inches away from each other. Fry for 4 to 5minutes until the underside is brown, then flip and cook another 3 to 4 minutes more.

4. Remove latkes to a warm plate and repeat process with remaining oil and batter.

5. Serve immediately with applesauce.

 

 

1 Serving

Calories

360

Fat

15 g

Saturated Fat

2.5 g

Protein

5 g

Carbohydrates

54 g

Fiber

7 g

Iraq: Let’s Not Repeat the Past

By Karen Jacob, WAND, Inc. Board Chair

Iraq War III Has Now Begun” blares the headline for Michael Knights’ Foreign Policy magazine blog post.  My heart breaks. Susan Shaer texts me, “Iraq. Again.”  

In the spring of 2002 as the war machine was cranking up Susan and I participated in a gathering of peace leaders strategizing how to stop the U.S. march to war with Iraq. Fabrications masked as facts were whirling around us. References to the hunt for weapons of mass destruction and retribution for 9/11 were being hurtled about by the Bush administration and their minions. The movement to prevent the war mobilized rapidly and by February 15, 2003 the largest world-wide anti-war protest took place with an estimated 10 million people in 60 countries participating. We all know what happened next despite the effort to prevent the invasion of Iraq. Shock and awe. Again.

The result? Here we are 12 years later and the United Nations is sounding an “extreme alarm” over the human rights disaster that is unfolding in Iraq, with hundreds recently killed, women being raped, and a mass exodus of displaced Iraqis. I ask when will they learn that pouring gas on the fire is not a solution?  

Keep reading

Karen Jacobs’ Sushi Night

By Bianca Tamburello, Dietetics Student, Sargent College

This week we gathered at Karen Jacobs’ SC Test Kitchen for our biannual sushi night! SC Vegetarian Brown Rice Sushi is one of the most beloved SC recipes. It gives us the opportunity to be creative with vegetable combinations, test new ingredients and create personalized dishes.

This week we experimented with the following ingredients and received wonderful reviews.

  • Sweet potatoes
  • Tofu
  • Cucumbers
  • Celery
  • Carrots
  • Avocado
  • Sesame seeds

Here’s how we made our sushi rolls.

Sticky Brown Rice

Before we could begin rolling our sushi, we prepared the sticky brown rice. First, we followed the cooking directions on the bag and added rice vinegar and soy sauce to while it cooked. Later, the brown rice was transferred to a bowl and was tossed with vinegar.

The proper amount of rice vinegar is important for the rice to be sticky enough to bind and hold together a roll. Last semester, Karen advised that 2 Tablespoons of rice vinegar should be tossed with the every 2/3rds a cup of brown rice.

Rolling Away

1.                 We set the nori down with the shiny side face down.

2.                 Spread the brown rice evenly to create a 1 ¾ inch border.

3.                 Next, we chose our ingredients and neatly stacked them on top of the brown rice.

4.                 We gently, yet firmly tucked the edge of the roll in toward the bare side of the nori and continued to roll until it was tightly packaged.

5.                 We dabbed some water on the ends of the nori to help seal the roll

6.                 Finally, we cut our sushi into 6 pieces and enjoyed with soy sauce and wasabi.

Take a look at last semester’s sushi night for more inspiration for your own rolls!

Sargent Choice Vegetarian Brown Rice Sushi

Yield 2 servings, 6 rolls each

Ingredients

2/3 cup dry short-grain brown rice
1-cup water
1-teaspoon water
2 teaspoons light soy sauce
2 tablespoons seasoned rice vinegar
1-teaspoon wasabi powder
2 (8 ¼ by 7 ¼ -inch) sheets roasted nori (dried layer)
½ Kirby cucumber, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/16-inch thick matchsticks
½ medium carrot, cut into 1/16-inch-thick matchsticks
½ small California avocado, peeled and cut into thin slices
¾ ounces radish sprouts, roots trimmed
6 ounces firm tofu, cut into several long pieces

Directions

1.         Prepare brown rice as directed with 1 teaspoon soy sauce

2.       While rice is standing, stir together vinegar and remaining teaspoon soy sauce

3.       Transfer rice to a wide, nonmetal bowl and sprinkle with vinegar mixture. Toss gently with      a large spoon to combine. Cool rice, tossing occasionally, for about 15 minutes.

4.       Stir together wasabi and teaspoon of water to form a stiff paste. Let stand for at least 15 minutes to allow flavors to develop.

5.       Arrange 1 sheet of nori shiny-side down on a sushi mat lengthwise. With damp fingers, gently press half the rice onto the nori with a 1 ¾-inch border on the farthest edge.

6.       Starting 1-inch from the side nearest you, arrange half the cucumber matchsticks, carrot    matchsticks, avocado slices, and tofu pieces in an even strip horizontally across the rice (You may need to cut pieces to fit). Repeat with half the radish sprouts, letting some sprout tops to extend beyond the edge.

7.       Roll the bottom edge of mat toward the top edge while holding the filling in place and pressing firmly to seal roll. Let stand for 5 minutes with the seam down and cut crosswise into 6 pieces with a wet knife.

8.       Repeat steps 5-7 with the second sheet of nori.

1 Serving
Calories250Fat10 gSaturated Fat1.5 gProtein12 gCarbohydrates28 gFiber6 g