kaphar

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 Titus Kaphar’s “Drawing the Blinds” and “Asphalt and Chalk” at Jack Shainman Gallery

Artist Addresses Racial Injustice, From 1700s Europe To Present Day America

In “Behind the Myth of Benevolence” a portrait of a silver-haired man is peeled back like a fallen drape, revealing behind it a nude depiction of a black woman, gazing at the viewer. In “Stripes,” a similarly stuffy portrait of a white man is cut into strips, many of which are nailed to the surrounding wall, exposing the wooden frame beneath. The image is both mischievous and violent, a ghostly hoax and a work of sadism. 
Titus Kaphar appropriates the visual language of American and European history painting and in doing so, takes the Eurocentric view of world history to task while illuminating injustice. The New York-based artist currently has two solo shows on view at Jack Shainman Gallery’s separate locations in Manhattan. His dual exhibition touches upon the human rights abuses of the colonial era as well as the current fight for racial equality in the US. Haunting yet visually alluring, Kaphar’s work tells stories of the African diaspora through imagery with a visceral, emotional impact.

The first part of the exhibition, “Drawing the Blinds,” presents a series of altered portraits of European nobility. Kaphar shreds canvases, obscures figures, and peels away layers to reveal hidden images. The artist couples his depictions of white aristocracy with portraits of black subjects in servile positions. His depictions of noblemen, who look like the subjects of portraits we’d unquestioningly encounter in a museum, become sinister when Kaphar juxtaposes them with evidence of the brutal exploitation that enabled such opulence to exist.

Via: hifructose

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MUST-READ: Titus Kaphar Talks Criminal Justice, His TIME Painting, and First Show at Jack Shainman

Titus Kaphar is having a big year. The artist, who splits his time between New York and Connecticut, has his first solo museum exhibition in the New York, titled “The Jerome Project,” currently on view at the Studio Museum in Harlem through March. Fortuitously, the show drew the attention of TIMEmagazine’s art director, who saw it and commissioned Mr. Kaphar to do a painting for the magazine inspired by the events in Ferguson, Missouri that have kicked off protests nation-wide. On Wednesday, Creative Capital announced that the artist was one of its 2015 awardees, set to receive funding to continue work on the “The Jerome Project.” And next week he will open his first solo show with Jack Shainman gallery, filling both its Chelsea locations. 

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just opened:

Drawing the Blinds
 Titus Kaphar

Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 W20th St., NYC

Through the manipulation of seemingly classical and canonical imagery, Kaphar introduces us to an alternate history that runs concurrent to the dominant narrative. Truths emerge to reveal the fiction and revisionism inherent in history painting and the visual representation of a moment or memory. Kaphar cuts, slashes, erases, layers and peels back the surface of his paintings. Each method is specific to the subject and meant to ignite and recharge the image, often that of the underrepresented body.  - thru Feb 21

"Through the manipulation of seemingly classical and canonical imagery, Titus Kaphar introduces us to an alternate history that runs concurrent to the dominate narrative. Truths emerge to reveal the fiction and revisionism inherent in history painting and the visual representation of a moment or memory. Kaphar cuts, slashes, erases, layers and peels back the surface of his paintings. Each method is specific to the subject and meant to ignite and recharge the image, often that of the underrepresented body."

Titus Kaphar was born in 1976 in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He currently lives and works between New York and Connecticut. His artworks interact with the history of art by appropriating its styles and mediums.

Drawing the Blinds, Titus Kaphar, Jack Shainman Gallery, Jan. 15 - Feb. 21, 2015

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ZERO HOUR is a creative interruption. 

Each issue is dedicated to visually exploring a single theme, person, place or time through the work of different artists from around the globe.

ISSUE 01:  WE PROTEST.  WE SAY THEIR NAMES.  WE CREATE.

FEATURED ARTISTS: DANNY LYON, JENNY HOLZER, MEKHI BALDWIN, MOJO WANG, BARBARA WALKER, ROBERT HODGES, GLEN LIGON, SEYMOUR CHWAST, ERNEST C. WITHERS, FAHAMOU PECOU, TITUS KAPHAR, MELEKO MOKGOSI, MICHAEL MURPHY, ABRAHAM OGHOBASE, HARANDANE DICKO, LOUIS DRAPER