kanji of the year

third year captain tsukki???
  • jersey #1
  • when ennoshita announced tsukki to be the new captain, nobody had opposed
  • even kageyama agreed that tsukki was the best choice after seeing him lead blocks since the shiratorizawa match and also other plays in their second year
  • everyone was excited because they want to see what the literal saltshaker will do to raise team morale and encourage team spirit
  • he will be the type of captain that is super logical and speak solely of facts and truths that he can see for himself
  • this made his pre-game speech/catchphrase (its “if i’ve seen us ace it so many times during practices, then we can do it again here”) so much more reassuring 
  • whenerver he compliments a kouhai, said kouhai develops a crush on tsukki because how can anyone not when someone as stoick as tsukki looks you in the eye and compliments you sincerely
  • can bring up the team’s confidence just by saying things like “nice serve” or “nice toss” because they know there is no sugarcoating
  • calls out kageyama whenever his tosses starts being too king-like (because that tends to happen whenever kags is exhausted and/or anxious) and calms him down with a snarky remark
  • “king, watch your tosses” “what???” “this is not middle school alright” “sorry i wi-” “i have been blessed. the king have bestowed onto me his holy apology. i can now spike with the strength of a lion an-” “shut up tsukki” “don’t call me that”
  • he will become a captain that is similar to both kuroo and oikawa
  • his scheming-captain abilities are apparent since all he is thinking about during matches is how to subtly pressure his opponents into making their own mistakes
  • kuroo being a huge dorky boyfriendsenpai when he finds out about tsukki’s captaincy and keeps going on about how tsukki learnt from the best (aka him)
  • but tsukki says that he oikawa’s captaincy is his ideal style and that he learn from observing oikawa back in his first year
  • it’s not exactly a lie since he really does aspire to be a captain loved and looked up to by his teammates that can easily scare his opponents
  • and just like oikawa, he knows when and where to use his team’s plays so that it will be the most useful against opponents
  • is now known as the clever blocker among the prefecture and setters are always trying new plays to trick his blocking
  • can stop his rowdy juniors’ and kagehina’s antics with just one look
  • tbh, he can easily scare his kouhais with his smirks and he is delighted about it
  • arranging combined training camps with date tech and seijou (held at seijou because damn that school is huge) because tsukki, koganegawa, and kunimi (the respective captains) still remained in contact
  • karasuno still attends the tokyo training camp in the summer and many younger blockers goes to him for blocking tips
  • arranging practice matches with his brother’s neighbourhood team because he thinks it is good practice for karasuno
  • despite him putting on a scary front, he is still easily bullied (especially by the other third years) into treating the team dinner once in a while
  • also not afraid to call out on any kagehina pda during practice
  • “shrimpy stop eye-fucking our sweet tobio in front of innocent tadashi” “yamaguchi is doing it to yachi too and you’re just jealous because kuro-” *hinata gets hit in the face by a ball*
  • and yams “accidentally” missed his serve and hit hinata twice. yachi smirks. 


third year first years: part 1 | part 2 | service-specialist!yams

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Kougi’s April Fool’s drawing
Source: @kougiw
Support the artist by liking/retweeting the original art or following

T/N: so I think that panel is supposed to be Riko reaching into her big front pocket and pulling out an envelope, like Doraemon’s 4D pocket. And the only reason I think this is because Kougi is a pretty big Doraemon fan. 

Kanji: 年

Meaning: year

Reading: とし、ネン (toshi, nen)

Will rendaku apply sometimes? No, the readings stay the same

About the kanji: One way to remember this kanji is seeing as a graph of what the meaning of year is: the revolution of a planet around a star. The orange stroke ノ is just the the relation between the planet and the star. The second part in red 丁 could be seen as the axis/position of the sun. Lastly, the white lines and the mirroed version of “ユ” is the actual orbit of the planet. Next time you do this kanji, just remember each piece and try imagining you’re describing the actual meaning of the character!

Words using this kanji:

年代 (ねんだい): era

年月 ( としつき):   months and years

年鑑 ( ねんれい ): yearbook

年中 ( ねんじゅう ): throughout the year

Example sentence:

新年もよい年でありますように。

shinnen mo yoi toshi de arimasu you ni

May the new year bring you happiness!

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3rd year koganegawa & some fellow 3rd year!first years

(worry not… the adidas hair will make a comeback…)

So I was looking at the persona casts’ ages at around the time P5 would be taking place and I’m crying.
K, so on the wiki, people have gaged Rise to be about 21 by the end of the game (cause she’s apparently developed a sex appeal after hitting 20. It’s in game during a commercial thingy I’m pre sure. Can’t recall 100% when off the top of my head though), so this has the game taking place at least 4 years after all the P4 shenanigans. This puts our yaso-second year babies at about 21-22, and Nao and Kanji at about 20-21
With this in mind, the port island-second years are 24, third years are 25, anD KEN MY SMOL SON IS
E I G H T E E N.
(Again, this is with the belief that the game falls in line with the 2016/2017 year)
THEN - here’s where it hits - this means that the main babes from P2IS (Tatsu, Ei, etc) are 35, Naoya/Earring Babe’s crew from P1 are in and around 37-38, Maya is 40, Katsuya is 42…
You guys I started crying my faves aren’t teenagers anymore I shouldn’t be emotional about this dammit

The Truth About Learning Japanese

(I’m going to start with a random side note: If I ever get a book deal to write Japanese primer, I’m going to call it I Eat Cake Everyday: A Complete Guide to Japanese with Stupid Sentences.)

It’s been a while since we’ve just talked, so I wanted to just take a moment to do that.

I think every Japanese platform at one point write an article about “the deep truth” of learning Japanese, claiming to give you the golden key that you need to become fluent in only 6 months or 1 year or whatever. 

The argument for those kinds of posts isn’t hard to understand: People are fundamentally similar. If people are fundamentally similar, it is very likely that works for me will will work for you. Thus, if this works for me, it will work for you. This does work for me. Therefore, it will work for you (most likely.)

This is why all articles start with something like, “I guarantee you that I’m no genius. [Insert daily task that the writer struggles with on a daily basis.] I’m just a regular person that tried out a few things until I found a winning formula.”

I, personally, want to do my own take on this kind of article. I won’t offer a golden key, but I’ll talk about learning Japanese.


1. Japanese is Coded in the Most Inefficient Writing System in the World

Kanji, the logographs that are the bane of all Japanese-learner’s existence, comes from China. Kanji itself, 漢字, means “Chinese characters.” Kanji were invented to suit the needs of the Chinese language (from way back when, before Mandarin/Standard Chinese was a thing.) Japanese, on the other hand, is a language isolate, and it is not related to Chinese. So the use of these Chinese characters has over time been used in different ways for different words and with different readings- for Kanji tend to have multiple readings, sometimes being just 2 and at other times 8. 

In Eastern Asia, the use of Chinese characters was widespread. It was used in Korea, in Vietnam, in Japan, to some varying extent in Malaysia, and the territories these nations conquered.

Korea developed an ingenious writing system called Hangeul, which now has all but totally substituted Chinese characters. Vietnam adopted the Roman alphabet with many diacritics. Japanese, well, Japanese developed two writing systems based on morae. These two writing systems could be used to write out the entirety of Japanese. Kanji is not really necessary. Further, there is no evidence to suggest that there are so many homophones such that even with context one could not make head or tails out of what was being said. 

So, Japanese does have a potential unique writing system that is easy to learn (it’s easier than Hangeul in my opinion), but it does not use it exclusively because of cultural reasons. Kanji is just hardwired into the culture.

But here’s where my personal opinion and advice come in: If you have to choose between loving Kanji and hating it, hate it. Don’t romanticize it. Don’t go “above and beyond” what you have to know because of your love for Kanji. Just learn what you have to learn, and leave it at that.

“How many Kanji must someone learn?” The official common use Kanji list (the Jōyō Kanji) lists 2,136 Kanji. How many readings are among these Kanji? Somewhere around 3,869. There are also some variations on Kanji that one should keep in mind and some Kanji that one sees only in names, so add around 400 Kanji to the official list and about 400 new readings.

“How many Kanji must I learn for my first year of Japanese?” All of them. That’s my honest advice. Don’t aim to learn only a few Kanji. If you’re going to learn Kanji, learn them all. Think in that mindset. As soon as you decide you want to learn Japanese, work on Kanji. Before you enter a classroom and learn your first few greetings and whatnot, make sure you know all the common use Kanji, or at least that you’re well on your way to knowing all the Kanji.


2. Language Learning is an Intensive Process

Learning a language is a process that scientists haven’t quite been able to describe accurately. We do know, nevertheless, that it’s a heck of a lot different from learning chemistry or carpentry or bicycling. 

In the Western world, there is this idea that one can learn a language in a classroom, normally as a subject period, with periods lasting somewhere from 50 to 70 minutes. Here’s the truth: it doesn’t work very well. (There are historic reasons for this way of learning a language, but we can talk about that some other time.) The success rates of language acquisition in classrooms is ridiculously low. This does not mean that language classes are bad: but it means that it just isn’t enough.

There are many reasons why learning a language in and of itself may be hard. It’d take forever to talk about all of them. 

But let’s talk a bit about lexicons. A lexicon, here, refers to the dictionary in your brain where you store the words you know. If you’re monolingual- you have a standard dictionary in your brain with a word and definitions. If you were raised bilingual, then you have one lexicon with two words and definitions. That is to say, if you’re an English-Spanish speaker, then you have “cat” and “gato” in the same space in your brain and you know that what applies to one applies to the other. Then, depending on your fluency and use, you may have two supplementary dictionaries where you store all the information about words that don’t exist in the other language and idioms and expressions and things like that. 

Now, if you’re an English speaker and, say, you want to learn German, part of what you’ll learn to do is to process your English lexicon entries into German. What that means is that you learn to engineer English words into German. “Father” turns into “Vater,” “to drink” turns into “trinken,” “Love” turns into “Liebe,” etc. So the words that have no relation with English (the non-cognates), turn into a supplementary lexicon and everything else is put through a mental processor. 

Because the brain can do this is the reason why many people in Europe can speak many languages. The fact that someone can speak Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, Italian, and French is not terribly impressive. The overlap in words (and in grammar) is so immense that what you’re doing is processing one language into another and you’re guaranteed an astonishing success rate.

Japanese, however, is different because it’s a language isolate. You can’t process one language into another. You have to learn words one by one. That takes time. It takes repetition. Memorization is as much an active process as it is a subconscious process. When people talk about the benefits of “immersion,” what they’re talking about most of the time is putting your brain into survival mode, i.e. either you learn all these words (and grammar stuff) or else you will not be able to survive and thus you will die. That is one way of doing it, and if you do not choose this path you have to commit some serious time to this. I believe that if one knows around 5,000 of the most frequently used words in any given language, one is guaranteed to know at least 95% of all the words one will hear/read in a day (given that one doesn’t go read a super technical manual on how to calibrate a nuclear reactor or something like that.) So, the question becomes how will you memorize 5,000 words? How long will that take? If one learns 10 a day, then it’s 500 days, and if one learns 50 a day, it’s 100 days. 

The tradeoff when it comes to speed is that the faster you learn something, the faster you forget. (When you relearn something, it should be faster nevertheless.) So how much time will you commit to learning a language? How will you follow that up? These are important questions.


3. Japanese Media is Considerably Insular

Japan isn’t like the United States. The United States wants every nation to know what music it likes, what fashion it wears, what it believes ideologically and socially, etc. The U.S. is everywhere.

South Korea, recently, is everywhere. K-Pop, K-Dramas, K-SNL, K-Beauty. If you want to know what Korea is up to, it’s pretty easy to find out. They want you know! 

Japan… eh. Japan is pretty good at making anime available globally. People know about Dragon Ball and Sailor Moon and the Mighty Atom and all that. When it comes to dramas and movies and tv shows, they’re not quite interested in that. Ages ago I wrote a post on the misconception of “Whacky Japanese Game Shows,” where I basically explained that most of those shows aren’t game shows but segments on variety shows, the only person in my mind having totally insane game shows being Beat Takeshi.

Okay, fine, what does this mean? This means two important things. First, one’s expose to the language outside of going to Japan or talking to Japanese people will be based highly on anime, which is fine but there are other styles of expressing oneself. One needs a bit of variety. If one goes the information/news route, then one is exposing oneself to something very formal and literary, but dull. Second, it means that when people teach Japanese, they’re going to assume that one wants to speak Japanese for business purposes. This sounds strange to say, but let me put it like this: Japanese is an important part of the world economy and STEM and anime, on the other hand, is not a sufficiently large part of Japanese culture so that the Japanese can figure you want to learn Japanese for that sole purpose. If you want to speak Japanese, then it must be for business purposes (and we’ll consider academics to be within business.) So you learn Japanese through the perspective of honorific and respectful language. This isn’t a bad thing either, but the desire to make you sound nice will often lead to lies about how Japanese actually works at a grammatical level.

(On the other hand, in South Korea the K-Pop/K-Drama boom is such a big deal that people around the world start learning Korean in hopes of auditioning for the big production companies in hopes of becoming actors, singers, dancers, and hosts.)

So here’s my advice: Once you have your feet wet with Japanese, once you know your Kanji and you know how to analyze a sentence (even if the lexicon isn’t all there yet), look at something that isn’t anime. I recommend movies, a lot of which are quite nice. Okuribito (Departures) was a great movie. An (Red Bean Paste) is a more recent film that was wonderful. Look up some movies. Sit down, and watch them. Watch it with subtitles, so you know what the movie’s about. But watch it a second time and a third time without subtitles. Try to see if you can make out a few sentences, read a few signs that appear in the background, take note of expressions or words you keep hearing. No, you won’t be able to understand the whole film all of a sudden, but it’s something new and something good and the more Japanese you learn, the more you will be able to return to the film and make out. Eventually, you will be able to listen to a sentence, pause the film, and look up the words you don’t know.


4. Learning Japanese Doesn’t Happen with One Method Alone

This is rather obvious, but it’s worth finishing this off with. There is an abundance of book series, CDs, cassettes, and even online resources (our own included.)

A language is greater than any method, than any curriculum, than any teacher. No one source has all the answers. One has to be encouraged from day one to look at many resources.

A library is a language learner’s best friend. Why? Because books can be expensive, and you will probably not need all the resources you dabble into for a long time. So, when you begin learning Japanese, look at the entire Japanese section, order a few famous books through InterLibrary Loan, if you have access to that, and sit down and just read the books, as if they were novels. Don’t memorize a thing. Don’t do the exercises. Just figure out their style, their aims, their perspective. Do read the footnotes! The more footnotes a book has, the more useful it tends to be in the long run. Information that isn’t relevant in Lesson 1 may be absolutely vital in Lesson 10. 

Check out some old books if you can. The way people learn a language today is not the same way they learned it 50 or 100 years ago. The most useful Italian grammar book I ever read was written in the 1800′s. Japanese books published before World War II may have some slightly outdated things, such as the /we/ and /wi/ morae, but they will be good for most of everything else. I’m personally dying to get library privileges again somewhere to be able to look into these, so if I find some good book titles I’ll let you know.

Because a lot of language instruction was, until recently, modeled after the way Greek and Latin was taught, reading some of our own material gets you familiar with the lingo, should you heed my advice. So people like to talk about cases and declensions and conjugations and moods and all that. The works of William George Aston are some of the most important books on Japanese historically. So, if you can find originals of those, please do read them.


So yeah, food for thought

2

kogasaku for @snepdragon​! (๑ơ ₃ ơ)

Kanji: 末, 未, and 本 (let’s climb a tree!)

I’ve got three kanji today, each made from the kanji for tree 木 with an extra line added!

…And yes, I do know exactly how you feel when you see 未 and 末.

Luckily, they actually kind of make sense! If you imagine yourself climbing a tree 木, the extra line always shows where you are.

For 本 (origin), you’re at the roots, the source of the tree. 本 is a common kanji that’s picked up some extra meanings through the years; it can also mean “book” (I guess you use books as sources of information?) or a counter for long skinny things (as in one “stick of” something–I guess roots ARE long and skinny).

  • 日本 (にほん) Japan (日=“sun”, “source of the sun” = “Land of the Rising Sun”)
  • 本物 (ほんもの) the real thing, the original one (物 thing)
  • 本屋 (ほんや) bookstore (-屋 store)
  • 一本 (いっぽん) one (of something long and skinny, 一 “one”)

For 未 (not yet), the biggest line is in the middle. That’s where you are–you haven’t reached the top of the tree yet.

  • 未来 (みらい) future (“hasn’t come yet" 来= come)
  • 未知 (みち) unknown (知 "know”)
  • 未成年 (みせいねん) minor, underage (“hasn’t become of age yet” 成 become, 年 year)

For 末 (end), the big line is way out at the very ends of the branches. You’ve reached the “end” of the tree now.

  • 週末 (しゅうまつ) weekend (週 week)
  • 結末 (けつまつ) conclusion (結 tie together)
  • 末っ子 (すえっこ) youngest child (子 child)

And if it’s any consolation, I don’t know of any words that are identical except that one has 未 and the other has 末, so you’ll at least have the rest of the word to help you out if you’ve got an ambiguous font style.

IS that any consolation? I PROMISE THEY LOOK WAY DIFFERENT TO ME NOW, THE HUMAN BRAIN IS AN AMAZING THING AND YOURS WILL FIGURE IT OUT EVENTUALLY.

4

Yuzuru makes sure he teases Nobu even on news XD

成長(Seichou) - a word Yuzu uses at the frequency only second to ‘kuyashii’, means growth. Based on that word, he used the kanji「成」for his kanji of the year, which implies ‘growth’ and can be read sei/naru/nari, so he just made a little joke right there with 信成(Nobunari) :3

time

過去 (kako) - the past
昨年 (sakunen) - last year
先月 (sengetsu) - last month
先週 (senshuu) - last week
昨日 (kinou) - yesterday
今年 (kotoshi) - this year
今月 (kongetsu) - this month
今週 (konshuu) - this week
今日 (kyou) - today
今 (ima) - now
現在 (genzai) - the present
明日 (ashita) - tomorrow
来週 (raishuu) - next week
来月 (raigetsu) - next month
来年 (rainen) - next year
未来 (mirai) - the future

fabuloustiger  asked:

what the fuck man that kogane post nearly killed me dude you can´t do this damn ( read as your art so great after seeing so much of it I thought I might be prepared but no I am still blown away every time thank you for your precious self doing this)

you’re so sweet, stop