kanaka

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Kanaka Maoli, Tino Rangatiratanga, and the Australian Aboriginal flag representing the people of Hawaiʻi, Aotearoa, and Australia’s fight for the right to exist in our ancestral homelands. 

[Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada] argues that ‘any time Hawaiians—or any other native people, for that matter—come out in force to push for more respect for our culture and language or to protect our places from this kind of destruction, we are dismissed as relics of the past, unable to hack it in the modern world with our antiquated traditions and practices.
—  David Malie, Science, Time, and Mauna a Wākea: The Thirty-Meter Telescope’s Capitalist-Colonialist Violence, Part II

What’s difficult about being from Hawaii is that everyone has a postcard view of your home. Hawaii lives vividly in people’s minds as nothing more than a weeklong vacation – a space of escape, fantasy and paradise. But Hawaii is much more than a tropical destination or a pretty movie backdrop — just as Aloha is way more than a greeting.

The ongoing appropriation and commercialization of all things Hawaiian only makes it clearer as to why it is inappropriate for those with no ties to Hawaii, its language, culture and people to invoke the Hawaiian language. This is uniquely true for aloha – a term that has been bastardized and diminished with its continual use.

Most who invoke the term aloha do not know its true meaning. Aloha actually comes from two Hawaiian words: Alo – which means the front of a person, the part of our bodies that we share and take in people. And Ha, which is our breath. When we are in each other’s presence with the front of our bodies, we are exchanging the breath of life. That’s Aloha.

—  Janet Mock

Thanjavur Santhanakrishna Kanaka

(born 1932) Neurosurgeon

T. S. Kanaka was Asia’s first female neurosurgeon. She is the first neurosurgeon in India to perform chronic electrode implants in the brain—having performed deep brain stimulation as early as in 1975. Kanaka served in the Indian Army as a commissioned officer, as professor at multiple medical colleges, and she set a world record for greatest number of blood donations (which has since been broken). She retired in 1990, but continues to act as a surgical consultant.

Number 220 in an ongoing series celebrating remarkable women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

“Aquaman is especially cool,” says Momoa, “because, being a Kanaka Maoli—being Hawaiian—our Gods are Kanaloa and Maui, and the Earth is 71 percent water, so I get to represent that. And I’m someone who gets to represent all the islanders, not some blond-haired superhero. It’s cool that there’s a brown-skinned superhero.”

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In 1893, armed U.S. naval forces helped American sugar plantation owners illegally overthrow Hawaii’s constitutional monarchy. One hundred years later, the U.S. apologized and admitted in a resolution that Native Hawaiians had never relinquished their claims to sovereignty. Today, many Native Hawaiians continue to yearn for independence. One activist, Bumpy Kanahele, has even created his own village as a model for Hawaiian sovereignty. AJ+’s Dena Takruri reports on the Hawaiian fight for sovereignty.

I think I heard about this place a long time ago? I heard there was a lot of issues with the Sovereignty land because it works like a reservation/community that shouldn’t be applied to Hawaii because it’s not even apart of USA? I don’t know much, but I remember that… A great story nonetheless!! 

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I am so over people thinking that Leis look like this: 

A lei takes hard time and vigorous work. We (Hawaiians) wake up at the crack of dawn to gather whats needed to make the lei that we want. It can take hours or days to make the leis and Hawaiian’s make leis with only good intentions and love because they believe that if you make a lei with malicious intent it will come out into the lei. There is many different ways to make leis and we also make leis from shells and feathers. It isn’t only Hawai'i that makes leis but throughout Polynesia fellow Polynesians make leis in their own style. 

To call the above image a lei is disrespectful to my culture and I want that shit to stop. That isn’t a lei, the images in the photoset are leis. 

The film [Niʻihau movie] “is particularly problematic in an age of Trumpian political warmongering with North Korea, with Hawaii as a potential nuclear target, and a potential ground zero for nuclear annihilation, especially if China gets involved.

This kind of careless, insensitive decision-making ― including the casting [decision] ― does not consider the real-world impacts on Native Hawaiians, Hawaii residents, and other peoples of color when we are not made visible as real people with a full range of human experiences and emotions.

Rather we are characters for white people to try on and mimic in their quest to fulfill their own ignorant, arrogant, incorrect fantasies about Native Hawaiians and other peoples of color.

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~~MY (THEY/THEIR) TRANS STORY~

I’m nb trans, and aporogender more specifically. Being fat and having big boobs in addition to dressing the way I want essentially means that I never pass in any situation. I have been told to just loose weight or bind so that some people will be more willing to respect my identity. I want my body to stay the way it is. Bodies don’t have gender identities, people do. Clothes don’t have gender identities, people do. My gender identity is valid regardless of what I look like or how I dress. Sorry, not sorry for being someone who takes more conscious effort to respect, the way I am and acknowledging that has been the defining thing that keeps me from ending my life.

OTHER IMPORTANT THINGS:

white/white-passing trans folx: can we please share more tpoc and especially dark trans black women? Also let’s not fetishize them. Let’s not talk about how attractive they are to us. They don’t exist for us to have something beautiful to behold.

Nonfat trans folx: please represent fat trans folx. Not just cute fat or sporty fat. Like actually go through the tags and rep all fat trans folx.

Able bodied trans folx: let us represent any disabled/mobility challenged trans folx. They are fucking valid and rarely if ever get representation. Also let’s not talk about what inspirations they are. Their life struggles are not there to make you feel better.

Financially stable trans folx: We need to represent poor trans folx. Money gives us access to soooo much that can help alleviate some of our pain or at least make it somewhat easier to manage.

TLDR: trans folx, represent other trans folx that are marginalized in ways you aren’t. While trans representation is abysmal enough, trans folx who are white and thin and able bodied and have financial stability are the vast majority of the kind of representation our community does get. Let’s do better.

*I definitely didn’t mention all the different levels of marginalization or marginalized identities within the trans community. Feel free to add to this, correct any mistakes I have made, etc.

** for those trans folx who are not wanting or not able to participate, you are in my thoughts today. You are not alone.

***I will go through the tag as much as I can, but also feel free to submit or tag me in things to make sure I reblog them.

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 There are endless costume ideas to choose from, so why would you choose costumes that enforce racist stereotypes? (Part 1) 

 For example, instead of dressing up in costumes that enforce stereotypes, can be neo-colonialistic, and fetishize racial/ethnic groups, dress up as something not racist, like Yoshi, a lava lamp, the Black Angry Bird, or a steel blue crayon.

 Dressing up as other ethnicities enforces harmful stereotypes. More so, sexualized racial costumes result in racial fetishization, which helps lead to higher rates of rape and human trafficking. Dressing up as other ethnicities is racist. Using the culture of others as a costume is racist. Let’s #endracistcostumes