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Middle Eastern Al-Ghuls, anyone? I think we’re not getting enough and I mean that very seriously.

They are Middle Eastern a fact of which has been confirmed, and portrayed, in every single comic canon containing them. Their Middle-Eastern ancestry is one of the few things about them that has never changed in comic canon and they’ve have always had features that match that…

Ra’s:

Talia:

Nyssa:

Damian Wayne:

Something of which that has been retained in all of their animated appearances:

They all have very, very, Middle Eastern features: dark hair, tan skin, narrow noses, slightly slanted eyelids. And yet in every live-action adaptation the Al-Ghul family has not been portrayed by Middle Eastern/Arabic actors and in most cases they don’t even look the slightest bit Middle Eastern. Let’s examine this further…

Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight Trilogy:

Out of the four Al-Ghuls we get two of them. Ra’s and Talia. Ra’s makes his appearances in Batman Begins and Dark Knight Rises. Talia makes her only appearance in the last film of the trilogy.

Neither look Middle Eastern in the slightest. Why is that? Because neither actor is Middle Eastern or has Middle Eastern ancestry. Neeson is Irish and played Ra’s with a softened Irish accent. Cotillard is French her father is of Breton ancestry and her mother is of Kabyle ancestry. She portrayed Talia with an accent that was all over the place but never once touched Arab or Middle Eastern. But what about the others?

Arrowverse:

I’m not a big fan of Arrow, and completely stopped watching, because they did a lot of things that I can’t get past. But the show has had three of the four Al-Ghuls: Ra’s, Talia and Nyssa. (Also Nyssa had the most appearances out of them all which makes no sense to me because her comic run was short and she’s pretty unknown.) Anyway, onto the photos…

Ra’s was portrayed by Matt Nable. Nable is from Sydney, Australia. Not much was given on his ancestry.

Nyssa was portrayed by Katrina Law. Law is an actress from South Jersey and not much was given on her ancestry either.

Talia was portrayed by Lexa Doig. Doig is from Toronto, Canada and her mother is Filipina and her father is of Irish and Scottish ancestry.

Even though these actors do look more like their characters do it’s not ok. None of the actors are Arab. The accents they spoke with were vaguely British and Nyssa’s was actually extremely so. (Side characters in Arrow were obviously Middle Eastern and spoke with obvious accents.) And then again this is coming from the show that turned Oliver Queen into Bruce Wayne…

Gotham:

Now I haven’t been watching Gotham anymore neither but I know that has not actually had any of the Al-Ghuls. Officially that is. But I firmly believe that the next episode, These Delicate and Dark Obsessions, will contain their version of Ra’s. In the trailer we see Bruce talking to this man:

And this man, obviously American by his accent, tells Bruce that he’s excited to see him start his training. (Paraphrasing here, of course.) But he also says “I have so much to teach you Bruce.” We all know that Ra’s is one of the many people who trained Bruce. Further analyzing makes me really think that he is indeed their version of Ra’s.

Look at what he’s wearing. Reminds me a lot of Ra’s go-to clothing. Just all black instead of Ra’s go-to jade green. Jade does make an appearance in the trailer when he touches his jade ring to Bruce’s forehead. It also appears that his fortress is in a mountain, or at least underground, perfect place for a Lazarus Pit.

But if this man is indeed Ra’s then that’s another non-Arab version.

Raymond J. Barry is oddly not listed in the episode credits but he was credited in the photo gallery. Not much is in his IMDB bio but he is from Long Island, New York. White-haired, blue-eyed, white man portraying an Arab character is just plain wrong.

How many live-action portrayals is that?

Three.

And none of them are Middle Eastern. They’re all wrong to some degree but having non-Arab actors portray Arab characters is taking it to a whole ‘nother level. It’s disgusting and incredibly racist. Especially when there are perfectly good, and extremely talented, Arab actors out there who can play these characters.

I’m just hoping that if the DCEU movies have any of the Al-Ghuls they cast Middle Eastern actors. Disney is doing it with Aladdin and DC better follow suit!

3

Photographies de Roger Enria, « Les Chasseurs de l’Akfadou : Kabylie 1955-1962 ». Région des At Yeǧǧer et At Ɣerbi, Kabylie (Algérie). 

Photographies by Roger Enria, « The Akfadou Hunters : Kabylia 1955-1962 ». Region of the At Yeǧǧer and At Ɣerbi tribes, Kabylia (Algeria). 

  1. Women coming back from the fountain (tala)
  2. Winter evening around the kanoun
  3. Leaving the house for the field work
  4. A group of women coming back from the fountain (tala)
Lxiṛ d cceṛṛ d atmaten akken i ddukulen ; ar tesseblɛeḍ timeṛẓuga ar d-eg°rint tẓidanin.
— 

Traduction : Le bien et le mal sont frères, ils marchent de compagnie : après avoir avalé les choses amères, viendront ensuite les douces.

Translation : Good and evil are brothers, they walk together : after having swallowed the bitter things, the sweet ones will come.

2

Official Alphabet of the  Amazigh :Tamazight 

The Tifinagh alphabet is thought to have derived from the ancient Amazigh script. The name Tifinagh possibly means ‘the Phoenician letters’, or possibly from the phrase tifin negh, which means 'our invention’.

Amazigh languages,   family of languages in the Afro-Asiatic language phylum. As they are the most homogeneous division within Afro-Asiatic, the Amazigh languages have often been referred to as a single language in the past (especially in the tradition of French scholarship). Amazigh languages are spoken today by some 14 million people, mostly in scattered enclaves found in the Maghrib, a large region of northern Africa between Egypt’s Siwa Oasisand Mauretania. The heaviest concentration of Amazigh speakers is found in Morocco.

Major Amazigh languages include Tashelhiyt (Shilha), Tarifit, Kabyle, Tamazight, and Tamahaq. The family may also include extinct languages such as the Guanche languages of the Canary Islands, Old Libyan (Numidian), and Old Mauretanian, which are known from inscriptions but have not yet been studied thoroughly enough to make any affirmative generalizations about their linguistic characteristics. Another possible member is the language called Iberian, after whose speakers theIberian Peninsula is named. An old consonantal alphabet (tifinagh) has survived among the Tuareg. It relates to the early Libyan inscriptions and the Phoenician quasi-alphabet.

Unlike some members of the Afro-Asiatic phylum, Amazigh languages are not tone languages. They do, however, include emphatic consonants (those formed deeply in the vocal tract), which occur in inherited words (such as  and ) and in the many loanwords from Arabic (such as ). Pharyngeal consonants (those articulated at the back of the vocal tract with the pharynx), such as  and ʿ (“ayn”), are found only in Arabic loanwords. Long consonants are quite common and are due to both gemination (doubling) and assimilation (i.e., when two adjacent but different consonants become identical in pronunciation, as with /b/ + /p/ in the English word “cupboard”).

The sound system is further complicated by the fact that different consonants and vowels may share some of their pronunciations, at times in relation to length. For example, w may be pronounced /w/ or /u/ when it is short but /ggW/, /kk/, or /bbW/ when it is long. There are three full vowels (ai, and u). Groups of consonants are made pronounceable by prothesis or epenthesis (the insertion of a vowel at the beginning or in the middle of a word, respectively). Amazigh languages usually insert the vowel ə (“schwa”), which, however, is described as a full vowel for some varieties such as Southern Amazigh, Figuig, and most recently, for Siwi (in Egypt). These languages also have a system in which some consonants, called “weak radicals,” can be used as vowels depending on where they occur within the word; the weak radicals y and w, for instance, can become the vowels i and u.

anonymous asked:

what's the kabyle myth?

i think i answered a question like this somewhere else but i can’t find it so it’s the myth that the kabyles of algeria are originally a european ppl (french skull-measuring anthropologists declared it so) naturally more amenable to french colonialism and only superficially muslim as opposed to the “fanatic” arab. this went hand in hand with the idea that algeria was roman territory once conquered by arabs and france, as heir to the roman empire, was restoring it to its rightful owners. if there was a revolt in algeria, it was automatically labeled an arab insurrection. if its character was so overwhelmingly kabyle that their participation couldn’t be denied, then it was cause the kabyles had been brainwashed by arab nationalism. when it became intellectually impossible to continue claiming the kabyles were europeans, this “honor” was taken away from them and colonial discourse was modified to the kabyles at least being the implacable foes of arabs. eventually the framework established was that the history of algeria and all north africa really was the history of antagonism between 2 races.

Lorsque les ténèbres engloutissent la clarté avec la hargne et la boulimie de la bêtise, et que l'on assiste amer au greffage morbide de l'identité millénaire, alors le mythe devient réalité. Et ces démons nous agressent à chaque instant. Nous refusons de plier. Le greffon ne veut pas prendre et les bourgeons éclosent plus bas avec la rapidité de la force de la vie qu'on étouffe. Nous n'aurons de paix que lorsque nous vivrons avec nous-mêmes et que nos ancêtres cesseront de se retourner dans leur tombe. La négation nous offusque à en mourir. Les tréfonds de notre âme en sont martyrisés. Matoub Lounes, tu chantes tout haut ce que tes frères ressentent tout bas. Victimes que nous sommes d'un système où le mot liberté veut dire : liberté des uns à disposer des autres. Tu es un baume au cœur outragé. Une preuve vivante de notre inénarrable attachement à rester debout. Le chant vient de ton âme et ta voix gonflée de rancœur et de colère nous réchauffe les os. Nous entrevoyons Taos Amrouche traverser les cieux de notre pays en compagnie d'un guerrier numide. Les tatouages de nos mères deviennent alors vérités absolues. Rien d'autre ne saurait ni ne pourrait nous guider. Lounes, tu nous as rappelés avec bonheur que même lorsque l'on perd son sang, l'atavisme se régénère. Y a-t-il loi de la nature plus belle ? La confiscation de notre liberté par ces gueux qui nous gouvernent a fait de notre peuple un troupeau malade où les meilleurs ont disparu, isolés ou vaincus, et les médiocres ont prit des allures d'astres scintillants. Pleure, ô vestales.
Chante-leur, Lounes, que la démocratie a été le premier goût dans nos bouche, que nous l'avons tétée au sein de nos mères. Chante-leur notre soif de justice et de réparation. Chante, Matoub, chante ! Un poète peut-il mourir ?
—  Lounes MATOUB/Lwennas Meɛṭub/ⵍⵡⴻⵏⵏⴰⵙ ⵎⴻⵄⵜⵓⴱ, “Regard sur l’histoire d’un pays damné” (partie 1, 1991) chanteur, musicien et auteur-compositeur-interprète kabyle engagé, né le 24 janvier 1956 à Taourirt Moussa, Kabylie et assassiné le 25 juin 1998 à Thala Bounane à l’âge de 42 ans.