just great in general

anonymous asked:

Ok, but how are Patrick's legs so amazing? I mean he looks great in general but his legs are just PERFECT

“I was fat with sick calves” - Patrick Stump

That about sums him up.

As to how, well he’s just Patrick.  Practically perfect in every way.

anonymous asked:

one thing i really admire about the way you draw kira (particularly melon boy kira) is how you make his eyes look really catlike!! i was just thinking about that and how nice it looks. your art in general is just great to look at tbh :)

thank you! i can be a bit inconsistent at times, but generally speaking, the angrier he is, the more likely i am to draw him with cat eyes (or just straight up killer queen’s eyes, though i reserve those more for just ‘killing instinct’ in general, not just when he’s pissed).

hey look it’s your daily reminder that it costs $0 to be kind and respectful to broadway performers

2

time to dance // panic! at the disco

anonymous asked:

buck if the avengers were animals what animals would they be???? thank you

i assume you mean based on personality, and not which avengers have been turned into which animals lately.
what has happened to my life that that is even a question i have to ask??

anyway, steve would be a dog. everyone is right on the money on that one; hed be big, fluffy, loyal as hell, appetite the size of rhode island and love to play fetch. and also have the bite power to sever a mans hand if he was so inclined. you would trust him with a baby but also to eat the face off anyone who threatened that baby. well. maybe not EAT. he does have SOME standards. theoretically.

tony would be a raven. reputation associated with death, but personality of a class clown–likes pranks, messing with people, and trying new stuff. dedicated to family and intelligent as hell. chatty. tool user. did you know ravens can people-talk? if they couldnt, im sure tony would figure out how anyways.

nat would be a swan. beautiful, graceful, but at the top of the do-not-fuck-with list in most animals books. mates for life and more loyal than you would think, with a take no shit and no prisoners attitude. i have a healthy terror of swans, as does any sane human being.

clint would also be a dog, but not like steve. hed be one of those scrappy little terrier mutts that descend from a working breed that are supposed to do things like kill rats. just as loyal and smart and fun-loving as the big guys, but makes up for lack of size with pure tenacity. and so scruffy its cute.

bruce would be an elephant. smart and social, with strong emotional bonds, generally calm and compassionate, but never something you want to be standing in front of when it gets pissed. also really enjoys peanuts?

thor would be a lion. content to chill out most of the time, and more social than most cats, but also totally down to throw down on a moment’s notice. pretty smart but not somebody you ever wanna cross. majestic as anything. 

i would be a bear. likes a lot of food in large quantities, and i would love to sit in a river and let dinner fling itself into my mouth. asleep like half of the time. big and badass but generally pretty chill, and smarter than you might think. also a faster runner than you might expect (that’s not really about me, bears can just run at like 35 mph which is a thought to keep you up at night.) and if theres one thing everyone knows about bears, it is that you do not mess with what they are protecting.
also they are opposed to forest fires?? not sure what that has to do with anything, but i guess i can get behind it

anyway… mats zuccarello donated 12000 norwegian kr to tromsø’s ladies team so they could participate in NM for women (nationals)
they wouldn’t have been able to go if it hadn’t been for him and i just want you all to know that mats zuccarello is an amazing person and a great ambassador for norwegian hockey, that’s all

3

I saw someone call bendy a demonic croissant and I couldn’t let it go, that’s such a great name. here’s a silly comic.

Please don’t tag as kin/me - Please don’t repost to other websites - Please don’t remove caption ✮

‘’Looking in the glass I see I am pretty not a girl anymore I’ve never felt like this before’’

-THE OPERA


Drawing period clothes makes me so happy.

MEDICAL BOOKS

If you’re looking for some medical (non-textbook) books to read in your limited amount of spare time, check out some of my favorites below:

The House of God by Samuel Shem

A classic pre-medical school book. It details residency life in the 1970s. You can talk about this book with almost any medical student or attending. It is practically a medical school requirement. 

Intern: A Doctor’s Initiation by Sandeep Jauhar

A more modern look into medicine residency intern year from the perspective of Cardiologist Dr. Sandeep Jauhar. Comes with the highs and lows you can expect. After having been through 6 months of residency, I would say it is very accurate.

Gifted Hands: The Ben Carson Story by Ben Carson. Just because I find Ben Carson incompetent as a politician does not mean I do not respect him as a doctor. He is a phenomenal pediatric neurosurgeon and this book details his story.

On Doctoring: Stories, Poems, Essays by Richard Reynolds

A book of stories and poems from doctors throughout time and also from famous poets and authors depicting their views of medicine.

Private Practice: In the Early Twentieth-Century Medical Office of Dr. Richard Cabot by Christopher Crenner

An interesting look into a Boston medicine clinic from the early 1900′s. With excerpts from old patient notes which I found very interesting. 

And if you have an interest is something more dark:

Blind Eye by James B. Stewart

The real story of a doctor murderer from the 1990′s who killed multiple patients without getting caught for several years.

Devil in the White City by Erik Larson 

The story of the World’s Fair in Chicago in the late 1800′s. A great look into the history of Chicago and the murderous doctor who roamed its streets.

And lastly:

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams. Just a great book in general. My favorite.

Suggested by other users:

The Making of a Woman Surgeon by Dr. Elizabeth Morgan

Suggested by http://thetay-in-the-757.tumblr.com

This book is my all time favorite, as I am a female aspiring to work in the healthcare system myself. Dr. Morgan chronicles her own journey in the male-dominated arena of medicine in the 1970s and 1980s, as she struggles to maintain an appropriate balance between remaining empathetic towards her patients and yet must toe the line of not becoming too emotionally involved with her patients so that she burns out, as well as maintaining her own femininity in a man’s world.

When Breath Become Air by Dr. Paul Kalanithi

Suggested by http://nandemokandemo.tumblr.com

When Breath Becomes Air is an autobiography written by an esteemed neurosurgeon who discovers he has Stage IV lung cancer in his final stages of residency. It appeals to not only medical students, with his profound impressions of cadaver dissection and his first life and deaths, but also to current medical professionals by questioning philosophical domains of mortality and what a meaningful life is, as well as to non-medical professionals with moving thoughts on family, life, death and meaning. It is not a novel to be missed by any person.

now that i’ve begun working more with energy, i wanted to share my methods of casting circles! when i first started working with energy, it was really hard to find references for casting circles, especially ones not dealing with the traditional Wiccan god/goddess. here are some methods and uses of casting circles!

Why Cast a Circle?

the primary reason i cast circles is to protect me from outside energy influences. most people associate circles to protection from ‘malevolent’ spirits, however, it’s just a great barrier in general!

here are some following scenarios i cast circles:

  • divination- to protect me from energies that might influence my cards or my interpretation o the cards
  • spellwork- pretty self-explanatory. i cast circles to protect from energies i don’t want in my spells, or from potential spirit attraction.
  • meditation- again, for energy use and to also not be disturbed from anything spiritual.

Methods of Casting

1 - Invoking Elements

a very basic way, if not the go-to way, of casting is to place each of the four elements at each of the cardinal directions. Earth at the north, Air in the east, Fire at the south, and Water in the west.

fire

water

earth

  • stones or crystals (this is what i love to use! just be wary that some stones are aligned with other elements. clear quartz is a go-to.)
  • salt
  • dirt (from your backyard or specific, such as hospital or graveyard. make sure to cleanse it.)
  • herbs (especially roots)
  • brown or black colored items

air

alternatively, any of these could be replaced with a tarot card of the corresponding suit! (wands for fire, cups for water, pentacles for earth, and swords for air).

to close the circle, walk clockwise starting in the east (air) and complete a full walk around the circle. do this as many times as you feel needed to envision a complete circle! after your use for it is done, unwind it by walking the same number of times counter-clockwise.

note: if you live in the southern hemisphere, you may want to reverse fire and earth in your directions and walk counter-clockwise to close the circle, and clockwise to end it.

2 - Envisioning

this is a very, very simple way to cast a circle! if you have very little time, simply imagine a ring of light around your workspace. you could align color to purpose as well.

the only downsides to this method include the fact that it may not be as strong as a physical circle for beginners especially, as i have learned many times over as i find energy that i don’t want in the circle. on top of this, to make it very successful, you may have to keep this image in your head throughout your spell or energy work, which may distract or hurt your concentration.

however, like i said before, it’s very easy, discreet, and requires no clean up! with practice, it could be very easy to maintain.

3 - Salt Circle

by simply spreading salt in a circle clockwise (or counter-clockwise depending on your location), you can create a strong barrier. as you walk around, envision your purpose of protection and safety.

if you are working outside, do not use salt. it will kill plant life! instead, consider alternatives such as: egg shells, diluted salt water, crushed herbs, flower petals, etc.

if working inside, consider setting out foil, cloth, or a tarp for easy cleanup. 

4 - Cleansing the Room Itself

if you find that you for some reason cannot cast a circle, or maybe are just starting out, consider cleansing the entire room instead!

some methods include:

  • smoke cleansing (NOT smudging. please do not call this action smudging unless it is part of YOUR culture.)
  • salt or protective mixture
  • dance/song
  • salt/water spray
  • incense and candles

for smoke cleansing, light your bundle and start facing eastward, spreading the smoke and asking for protection from either the corresponding element or any deities/spirits/etc. you worship. move clockwise or counterclockwise.

for salt or protection mixtures, simply place a small pile in each corner of the room or at the cardinal directions.

dance and song can celanse the room when accompanied with smoke especially. 

the salt water spray can be used similar to the protection mixture – spray a little in each corner or at the cardinal directions.

incense and candles can be placed in corners, the directions, or just throughout the room to act as protective energy.

Final Notes

  • make sure to remove your circle after you’re done!! leaving it up isn’t safe and could be draining on your energy or health.
  • try not to leave the circle in the middle of your work, if it can be avoided. ive had to do it before and nothing bad happened, but sometimes it ocould break the circle, or bring unwanted energy or precense in.
  • do your absolute best to have all your materials in the circle before you cast it. bringing items that were not in the circle before could carry energy that you just do not want in your circle. i’ve messed up plenty spells because of it already. if it is really necessary, cleanse the item as thoroughly as you can (quickly if you need to), and enter the circle from the east.

if these methods don’t work right away, don’t worry! these take lots of practice. some easy ways to try casting daily include:

  • cast a circle before you meditate
  • cleanse your room before you do homework for a safe space to work
  • if you have a form of divination, cast a circle before drawing a daily reading (i do this in the morning to see how the day will go or seek advice for the day!).

good luck!

4

Crowley and Lucifer // A delightful surprise // All Along the Watchtower 

anonymous asked:

hey there! thanks for answering all our questions on this blog + how possible would it for someone to crack ribs with a solid kick? there's a character i have in mind that's escaping captivity, but they're also young, so i'm not quite sure how easily they'd be able to hurt the (adult) antagonist in such a manner, especially lacking any fighting experience to begin with?

Well, you can break someone’s ribs with a kick. That’s the entire purpose of the roundhouse, especially the version where you strike with the ball of the foot rather than the top of the foot. (And… aren’t like me when I was seven or eight, when I was new to sparring and totally stubbed my toe in another kid’s side at a tournament after my brain/body got confused between the two. I didn’t break my toe, but I could’ve.)

That story above is important, by the way. If you’ve got a character who doesn’t know how to fight then they’re not even going to get that far. If you don’t know how to kick then that’s a great way to get your leg caught by someone who knows what they’re doing. They catch the foot by the ankle, and then drag you wherever they want. That’s assuming the character can get their leg up and out without falling over. Even if they do manage that, say because they’ve watched a lot of martial arts flicks, they won’t know how to generate power and will be very slow. A, B, and C occur anyway. Your protagonist is going to end up back wherever they were being kept, this time in a much less comfortable position.

Even for an experienced martial artist, kicks require fairly constant bodily upkeep in order to be able to do them cold (much less perform them at all). That’s not a combat scenario, that’s just in general. You’ve got a great chance of pulling all the leg muscles you need to get away, including ones you didn’t realize you had and that’s if you don’t break your toes. Board breaks with the roundhouse kick are the most terrifying of them all because you’ve got to remember to curl your toes just right in order to carry your foot through the board.

Kicks are off the table.

More importantly, this is an exact rendition of the “Feel Good Violence” trope: My Instincts Performed A Wheel Kick.

The protagonist is suddenly and randomly enough good at fighting to not only fight, but win when making their first attempt at a violent altercation. They use techniques which require a fairly high level of dedication and aptitude out of “natural ability” and “instinct”.

Unless you’ve got an ironclad reason for invoking the trope (past lives/ immortality/memory loss/the matrix) it will undercut your narrative credibility in ways the story cannot recover from.

When you’ve cracked your foundation, you’re done.

“The only difference between reality and fiction is that fiction needs to be credible,” - Mark Twain

Narrative integrity is based on the rules or limitations we’ve set for ourselves, those limitations are the ironclad rules by which the narrative functions. They exist on two levels: in behavior and actions of characters within the world, and on a secondary level the setting’s behavior around them. Everything in your story must be working to uphold the fiction. When it doesn’t the audience’s “suspension of disbelief” starts to crack. You are beholden to the rules and limitations set down by your setting. Without them, you have no story.

When you’re setting out to create a character, there are four questions you should ask yourself:

1) What can the character do?

2) What can’t the character do?

3) What is the character willing to do but can’t?

4) What can the character do, but is unwilling to?

Within these four circles you have your character, their ethics/morals, and their limitations. That is the box you’ve created for yourself. It is important to own it and abide by it. When dealing with a protagonist, those limitations are not just the foundations of a character but the entire narrative.

Your character cannot fight your antagonist in a one on one and come away with any victory because you have established they don’t know how to. That is a limitation you set for yourself. That the audience knows and understands, so they will expect this character to act in accordance with it. They may want to walk up to the antagonist and kick them in the ribs so hard those ribs break, but they can’t. That desire could be a driving force behind them learning to fight later. As of now, though, their powerlessness in active violent conflict serves to reinforce the antagonist’s position. Reinforcing the antagonist’s position is for the narrative good.

They should be making choices based on the Venn diagram’s center: when what they can do meets what they are willing to do.

If what they can’t do conflicts with what they’re willing to do and they go with it anyway then the result is a failed escape attempt. A captive’s survival is based on their value. If they’re valuable enough for the antagonist to go through the trouble of capturing them in the first place, then they’re probably not going to be killed. At least, not until their value runs through. They lose and wind up back in captivity under more scrutiny, more security, and with fewer exit options. This reminds us why they were captured in the first place, and reinforces our villain’s position.

A protagonist can fail and retain their legitimacy many more times than an antagonist can. While this is a perfectly legitimate narrative outcome, I don’t think its the one you’re looking for.

This is the second issue with your question:

A narrative’s antagonist is its backbone.

Your antagonist is one of the most important pieces of your story, if not the most. They are the lingering threat, the shadow hovering over the story, and the knife at your protagonist’s throat. They are seventy percent threat, and the last thirty relies on their ability to make good on it.

One of the biggest mistakes an author can make is assuming their antagonist’s position in their narrative and the threat they provide are impervious to harm.

Unlike your protagonist, your antagonist is always in a precarious position. They must constantly re-affirm themselves and the threat they represent through their actions. That threat is all consuming and when challenged, it must either be defeated or confirmed.

If defeated, then the threat is gone.

If confirmed, then the threat level is heightened because now we imagine what they might do next.

An antagonist can re-affirm themselves after a defeat, but they’ve got to double down on their effort and create a new threat rather than relying on their old one. You as the author must work harder to make up for what you lost, and even then you’ll never have the initial fear ever again.

The first rule of the antagonist is: your capital is limited, so spend it wisely.

When you undercut an antagonist in favor of the protagonist before its necessary, you damage the antagonist’s credibility and, subsequently, their position in the story. When you lose your antagonist, you lose most of your narrative tension.

A character who doesn’t know how to do something is applying a limitation to the character. You are applying a restriction to what they can and can’t do. If you’re character doesn’t know how to fight, then fighting will be off the table. More importantly, having your character succeed at a skill set they have no experience in doesn’t make them “awesome” or “cool”, it means instead that the other characters who put time and effort into honing these skills suck.

When those characters are your antagonists… that hurts.

If you’ve got a protagonist with no hacking experience who manages to overcome a supposedly great hacker on their first or second go round with no time spent learning how to hack, then who looks bad? The second hacker. They’re the ones who are supposed to be good at hacking. If the narrative hinges on them being a major antagonist, then the author just shot their narrative in the foot.

Combat skills are the same way. They’re a skill set, not an instinct. They don’t come naturally, and take a great deal of time and effort to hone.

If your goal is to show your dangerous antagonist is a bumbling moron when an untrained teenager gets a lucky shot so miraculous they manage to lay them up for the rest of the story, then that’s a job well done.

If your goal is for the antagonist to maintain their credibility within the narrative? Don’t use them for a punching bag.

Violent confrontation is based just as much on threat of force as it is on the follow through. The threat is usually more frightening than what follows, and your protagonist is already challenging the fear by trying to escape. From a narrative perspective, if they get over their fear enough to challenge their antagonist directly then it’s game over. You spent your all capital either at the beginning or midway through the story, and you’re not getting it back.

Remember, your antagonist has to do just as much work to earn their street cred as your protagonist. Their position is a delicate balance of power management and threat of force. They rely on show over tell. They need to live up to whatever it is you’ve been saying about them. They need to be as dangerous as they’ve been puffed up to be, unless their reputation itself is the real antagonist. Never forget, your antagonist (whoever they are/whatever it is) is the backbone of your story. They are often the driving force of action, the reason why the protagonist is struggling, and the focal point. In some ways, they are more important than your protagonist because without them the protagonist’s got a whole lot of nothing.

When you undercut your antagonist, you also hurt your protagonist’s development. You cheat them of their chance for growth, and deny them their ability to show off whatever it is that they’re actually good at i.e. using their bravery, intelligence, and cleverness to sneak out.

If your protagonist beats down their Goliath at the beginning of (or even the middle) of the story then there’s no reason for them to go to the mountain master and learn to throw rocks.

-Michi

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things that have happened in super paper mario
  • apparently mario is the hero of prophecy said to save all worlds from a universe-ending chaos heart brought about by princess peach and bowser getting married
  • if you keep saying no to the guy who wants to give you the pure heart so you can save the world you will eventually get a game over
  • “ok yeah. cool. great. got it, k?”
  • “GRAH-BOOGLY”
  • just o’chunks in general, really
  • “and so i arrive, like a sudden windstorm at a kindergarten picnic”
  • shut up dimentio
  • c:// error c:// running insult generator c:// result : go away yeti-lip
  • BLECK says count bleck
  • theres a part in chapter two where everything is rhyming. everything. is. rhyming. merlee won’t stop rhyming and mimi does it herself on accident
  • “and here i thought mimi’s ideal world was a gem-filled pool with hunky lifeguards”
  • “ENJOY LABOR”
  • press left on the d-pad for six minutes to get at least 10,000 rubees to get a really unnecessarily long code from a guy to get 1,000,000 rubees, essentially stealing them, to pay off your debt
  • mimi breaks her own neck and spins her head around before giant-ass spider legs come out of her head and she chases you around merlee’s unnecessarily large basement
  • CHERBILS
  • peach is actually a solid character in this game and she owns up to her own actions and helps you (and is a really good and balanced character) in the game
  • “my friends on the digibutter.nerr forums are gonna FREAK when i show them this”
  • apparently the bitlands has an affinity for red
  • “listen, pal, nobody likes having their butterfly kidnapped by a nerd, but you have to listen to me”
  • “but im BOWSER! im prime cut 100% final boss!”
  • this guy just shows up and starts hollering about bowser’s girth
  • I WOULD GLADLY STRANGLE AN AMAZEE DAYZEE IF GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY
  • “SHAKE THAT THORAX”
  • “do not think i did it out of the kindness of my robot heart”
  • right before you fight the boss of chapter three you have to answer a bunch of questions as peach (”my first love was an anime character!”) and then you have to go IN as peach and the boss (a chameleon nerd) gets so nervous that he opens up a program that turns the whole world into a dating sim
  • “so… how much do you make”
  • shut up dimentio
  • if you say no enough times to using the helmet you’ll get a game over
  • squirps
  • just
  • squirps
  • “AMORE AMORE AMORE”
  • theres an outhouse in space for some reason
  • you take this guy’s precious treasure map and give it to some alien fairy in said space outhouse for him to use as toilet paper
  • LUIGI GETS BRAINWASHED????
  • mr. l just kicks squirps away. just kicks him away.
  • “CRAGGA-WAGGA-WOOOOOOO”
  • a very old caveman says “hook us up, brahs”
  • you can make a pixl shout various phrases, all of which i opted to make the guy say curse words
  • “YEH CRAZED LOON”
  • S  H U T  U P  D I M E N T I O
  • “OOOOOWEEEEEEEOOOOOOOO”
  • a world literally ends right before your tender eyes. there is nothing left when you return to its remains.
  • DIMENTIO KILLS LUIGI
  • HE ACTUALLY KILLS HIM
  • LIKE
  • LUIGI ENDS UP IN THE PAPER MARIO EQUIVALENT OF HELL FOR SOME REASON
  • HE ACTUALLY DIES
  • AND THEN DIMENTIO GOES AND KILLS MARIO, PEACH, AND BOWSER TOO
  • WOULDN’T IT BE FUN IF WE COULD GO TO HELL
  • wELL SURPRISE, THE ONLY ONE THAT WENT TO HEAVEN WAS PEACH
  • “some people call it world -1″
  • the nimbis just talk in ye olde english
  • “gameovergameovergameovergameover CONTINUE”
  • borguy the 64th
  • shUt up dimentio
  • the weird emotional underlying story you’re getting after each chapter with some wahoos named blumiere and timpani with some mahjong-ass music playing in the bg
  • “THOU ART TOAST”
  • there is a character that is literally the paper mario equivalent of lucifer
  • SHUTUPDIMENTIO
  • IT TURNS OUT THE MAIN VILLAIN OF THE ENTIRE GAME IS A VERY EMOTIONALLY TORTURED PERSON AND IS TRYING TO COMMIT MASS OMNICIDE BECAUSE HE THOUGHT HIS DAD KILLED HIS LOVER
  • “What Ended My Last Relationship” “DADDY ISSUES”
  • one by one each of your party members and each of count bleck’s main minions get ‘killed off’ before returning in the final fight
  • I AM GOING TO STRANGLE YOU DIMENTIO
  • DISRESPECTING LUIGI
  • DISRESPECTING LUIGI
  • DISRESPECTING LUIGI
  • DISRESPECTING LUIGI
  • DISRESPECTING LUIGI
  • that ending is going to rip out your heart and stomp on it so you’d best bring some tissues
  • NASTASIA DON’T CRY
  • DFJHKFLHFLDJKSHDFKHGJKLDHFGLKHGFDJKLHFGIOGJ
  • a good game overall
Altean Lance

So, I have recently fallen in love with Sad Altean Lance;
King Alfor favors his first born child, Allura, not only due to the fact that she was the first child but also because of how much he seems himself in her. Allura always studies hard, has a speech prepared for every event, and is honestly just a great leader in general.
Then there’s Lance, who really does try, but can’t ever seem to keep focus during his classes, and loves to be around people but doesn’t like the attention just being on him (so speeches were a big no). He would rather be a follower, than a leader, which Alfor doesn’t like AT ALL.
Due to this, Alfor basically completely shuts Lance out, instead choosing to focus his attention on Allura.
King Alfor has new dresses tailored for her, has her favorite foods (foods that Lance hates) made for her every meal, and goes as far as saying she is his favorite child.
Now Lance is used to Alfor spoiling Allura, but he never goes as far as admitting favorites and this new information just shatters Lance’s poor little heart.
So he tries. He tries to pay attention in class, but is always distracted by something. He tries to write a speech, but Allura’s always outdo his own.
Lance hates giving up, he would rather go down swinging, but doesn’t know what to do to make Alfor look at him again, to look past Allura for once and finally treat him like his own son again.
Which is why, at the next event held, a party celebrating the new alliance between Galra and Altean, Lance flees with a lonely Galra named Keith, abandoning his princely duties, his family, everything he had; because he see’s himself in Keith.
It’s only after the party that Alfor notices Lance is gone (Allura noticed earlier but didn’t want to ruin the mood) and sends a servant to retrieve him. When the servant comes back without Lance is when Alfor feels worried.
Guards searched for days, and found nothing.
That’s when Alfor weeps, scared his son is dead, so upset with himself for just pushing Lance to the side; had he been a better Father, his son would still be with them.

———————–

Submitted by @ziaraderosa

This is perfection. Please make a fic. 

I can not express how important Inside Out is.

Because it’s a movie aimed primarily as kids that has awesomely diverse female representation when it comes to personalities, as well as beautiful animation, explains minds and emotions and memories and all that stuff in a way children can easily understand, passes the Bechdel test in like the first ten minutes, and stresses the importance of your own personal mental and emotional health.

This is a movie with a female protagonist (who enjoys both rainbow unicorns and hockey) that tells kids that if they’re feeling out of sorts, if they’re feeling sad or angry or afraid or disgusted, that’s okay. That’s normal. And it’s telling them to speak up, to tell someone, to express what they feel, because bottling up your emotions - putting on a brave face when you really need to cry - only leads to more pain.

Inside Out teaches kids that it’s okay to feel and that is so, so, so important.

anonymous asked:

Hey Thomas! There's a podcast called Welcome to Nightvale that I think you might like. It's really weird, heartfelt, great story line, beautiful music, and just a good time in general.

I listened to it before, wasn’t my cup of tea, but I appreciate the suggestion!