judaized

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Holocaust denial rages on in 2017

  • In a recent article for the Atlantic, Holocaust expert Deborah Lipstadt says there are two types of Holocaust denial: “softcore” and “hardcore." 
  • According to Lipstadt, softcore Holocaust denial is more concerned with minimizing the facts, "arguing that Jews use the Holocaust to draw attention away from criticism of Israel." 
  • It also calls for the "de-Judaization” of the Holocaust.
  • In 2014, the Anti-Defamation League surveyed more than 53,000 people in over 100 countries and found staggering results. 
  • At the time, 54% of respondents had heard of the Holocaust, and 32% of them said that the number of people who died had been exaggerated. 
  • Of the 74% who had never met a Jewish person, 25% harbored anti-Semitic attitudes. A
  •  2015 update of this survey estimated that 24 million Americans still hold anti-Semitic sentiments, and 20% of those surveyed believe that Jews “still talk too much about what happened to them in the Holocaust.”
  • According to the Holocaust Museum website, the movement has gained a boost from the internet “because of the ease and speed with which such misinformation can be disseminated." 
  • Unlike Germany or France, the U.S. does not criminalize the denial of the Holocaust or the propagation of Nazi and anti-Semitic speech, the website reports. Read more

anonymous asked:

Why do so many Jews hate messianic Jews? Or say that their beliefs 'aren't compatible' with Judaism? Isn't Judaism a religion/culture/belief system that has evolved throughout the centuries to adapt (if that's even the right word) to the different questions, views, beliefs or even identities we as humans have? So what makes messianic Jews 'fake Jews' (a term I've literally heard)? Hopefully you don't mind the question im a gentile who follows a lot of Jews and I've just always been curious

Messianic Judaism didn’t emerge organically from Judaism like Chasidism or Reform or Conservative Judaism. It was created by Christians to mimic Judaism in order to “trick” Jews into practicing a Judaized version of Christianity. That alone makes it not a legitimate form of Judaism.

Messianic Judaism appropriates many practices from Rabbinic Judaism which was explicity rejected by Christianity. Jesus never practiced this form of Judaism because the Beit Hamikdash still existed during his lifetime. It doesn’t celebrate what Jesus did during his lifetime, it appropriates what other Jews did after the Romans (who killed Jesus) destroyed our Holy Temple and had to recreate our own form of Judaism in the ashes of Judaea. 

So, essentially, Messianic Judaism is both cultural appropriation and an attempt to convert Jews through deceit. It is not recognized by any extant Jewish movement and its adherents do not practice Judaism, even those few who are ethnically Jewish.

It’s that time again.

Springtime. The Paschal season. Aviv.

The season of rebirth, renewal, and too much bleeping rain.

The time of flowers blooming, bears waking, trees budding, eggs hatching, and Jews frantically cleaning their homes and screaming this crucial message into the void:

No, Christians, you should not have Passover seders.

“But why?” comes the eternal reply. “The Old Testament is part of our tradition too! Jesus celebrated Passover! Why can’t we?”

Read on, and I’ll tell you.

Keep reading

My feeds for all of today and yesterday have been full of imagery of Holocaust victims - particularly those who were turned away on the St. Louis. And considering so many of the sources making those posts, I have to think:

“Yes, those luckless Jews had to go back to Europe to be murdered. But if any of them had instead made it to British Palestine and picked up a rifle, would you still feel sorry for them? Would you even still fault America for rejecting them?”

That goes for Anne Frank too. Bet your ass that if she’d been smuggled into the Haganah and lived, they’d hate her.

A lot of leftist goyim only like dead Jews, who they can compare to themselves, as part of comparing the Holocaust to other problems.

My sympathies go out to the desperate and pitiful refugees from the Middle East today, especially Syria. But it seems a bit sour to honorarily Judaize them, what with how Syria has been an explicitly antisemitic state basically forever and loved the Holocaust ever since they first heard of it. Why can’t their own lives be worth preserving just because their own lives are worth preserving? Why do they have to be Just Like The Jews?
Against Messianic Judaism

           There is a small, but vocal, movement among Christians who wish to “restore” Christianity as a sect of Judaism. They primarily rely on Jewish converts to Christianity to bolster their claims to legitimacy, however, large numbers of people who claim to be Jewish in Messianic communities are not Jewish at all. Messianic Judaism is in fact a misnomer as their central beliefs and authoritative scriptures are Christian, not Jewish. A more accurate, and older, name would be Hebrew Christianity. As I will demonstrate, the Messianic movement is riddled with inconsistencies, contradictions, deceitful or incorrect terminology, and theological confusion. Messianic Judaism has the unique distinction of so thoroughly misunderstanding Christianity and Judaism that it is considered a heresy by both. While my criticisms will not likely sway a committed Christian in this movement to abandon their mistaken, anti-Semitic sect, I do hope that it will help to prevent anyone who may wish to join them from doing so. In this essay, I will bring forth arguments against Messianic Judaism, this will include criticism of Christianity itself. However, I do not wish this to be seen as an attack on Christianity. I respect committed, honest Christians and their right to practice their faith. My criticism of Christianity will only be for the sake of demonstrating why Judaism and Christianity cannot be joined in a syncretic religion and how Messianic Judaism disrespects both Judaism and Christianity.

           Before going further, we must define what we mean by Messianic Judaism. Primarily, it must be kept in mind that this sect is not a sect of Judaism at all. All of its central beliefs, which can be found at mjaa.org, are Christian in nature. Their statement of faith is primarily concerned with the Christian Trinity and salvation from sin through faith in Jesus, who they identify as the Jewish messiah (a claim that will be examined later). They also accept the Christian New Testament as authoritative scripture which will prove problematic to their claims of practicing Judaism in any sense of the term. Another important aspect of their purpose in existing is a desire to not assimilate into the larger church and to “share this way, this truth, and this life with their Jewish brothers and sisters.” They simultaneously wish to remain separate from the goyische churches and convert other Jews to Christianity. Both of these goals will be analyzed below.

           The fundamental problem with Messianic Judaism is their insistence on calling their religion Judaism. Despite their claims to be practicing a “complete” form of Judaism, they negate the entirety of Judaism. As the late Orthodox Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan wrote, “Christianity negates the fundamentals of Jewish faith, and one who accepts it rejects the very essence of Judaism. Even if he continues to keep all of the rituals, it is the same as if he abandoned Judaism completely.” Although Messianic Jews retain some Jewish rituals, their Christian beliefs, and the Christian New Testament itself, subvert and destroy the essentials of Jewish faith and practice.

           The Christian New Testament explicitly claims that the Law (i.e. the Torah) is obsolete and believers in Jesus are free from both the Law and sin (Romans 7:6; Galatians 3: 23-29; Hebrews 8:13). In fact, Paul makes an explicit connection between sin and following the law, claiming, “Sin, seizing an opportunity in the commandment, deceived me and through it put me to death” (Romans 7:11). Considering that all Jewish religious rituals are grounded on the commandments of the Torah or Talmud, the Messianic insistence on holding to any of them places them in direct contradiction with their own scriptures that declare such rituals null and void. A perfect example would be the laws of kashrut, which are directly overturned in the book of Acts by one of the first church councils (Acts 15). Kashrut is an important part of traditional Jewish religious observance based on the Torah and Talmud; yet the Christian scriptures explicitly reject this Jewish practice and the argument made by some in the council to have gentile converts to Christianity “observe the Mosaic law” (Acts 15:5). And the rejection of Jewish law was not limited to gentile converts, but was practiced by Jewish Christians as well, as depicted in Acts 10. Throughout the Christian New Testament, Jewish law is rejected, the Torah is denigrated, and the essentials of the Jewish faith are subverted.

The rejection of Jewish law and practice in the Christian scriptures becomes important in later church history and church councils which explicitly forbade the “Judaizing” of Christianity as heresy (known as the Ebionite heresy). It was argued, based on the teaching of Paul, that “if justification comes through the law, then Christ died for nothing” (Galatians 2:21). The practices of the Jews were further tarred by the antisemitism of the gospels, which portray the Jews as obstinate children of the devil and the killers of Jesus (John 8:44; Matthew 27: 22-25). Jewish practice was even further tarred by the portrayal of the Pharisees in the gospels and their position in Judaism as the rabbis who established the Talmud as the authoritative interpretation of the Torah. The authority of the rabbis was rejected by Jesus himself, most explicitly in Mark 7:13, claiming that the Pharisees/rabbis “nullify the word of God in favor of tradition.” Because Jewish rituals are largely based on the interpretations of Jewish law given in the Talmud, and Jesus himself rejected the authority of the rabbis, the church also rejected Jewish rituals, traditions, practices, and interpretations. Messianic Judaism neglects this anti-Jewish aspect of Christian history, teaching, and scripture for ideological reasons, i.e. the conversion of Jews to Christianity and the desire for a Jewish aesthetic in their worship services.

           Furthermore, the Messianic insistence on keeping themselves apart from the larger goyische church violates the teachings of the Christian New Testament. In Galatians 3:23-29, Paul states that there is “neither Jew nor Greek” and that all Christians are children of God and through Jesus they are all descendants of Abraham. Paul is essentially arguing that goyim have been grafted into the people of Israel through faith in Jesus. Ephesians 4:1-5 calls all Christians to live together in unity as “one body and one spirit […] one Lord, one faith, one baptism, one God and Father of all.” Paul further teaches in 1 Corinthians 12:13 that “in one spirit we were all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Greeks, slaves or free persons.” He gives this exhortation after lambasting the Corinthian church for having divisions and factions (1 Corinthians 11:18-19). The insistence on maintaining Jewish traditions not only doesn’t fit the theology of Christianity, it creates factions and divisions in the community which is also explicitly forbidden by Christian scriptures.

           Moving away from the problems implicit in trying to make Christianity more Jewish, there is the problem of theology in Messianic Judaism. Theologically, they are Christian, not Jewish. In fact, their beliefs about the Trinity and Incarnation are remarkably orthodox for Christianity. They believe that there is one God in three persons: the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. They believe that Jesus is the son of God and God incarnate who died for the forgiveness of sins, and that the Holy Spirit dwells in the church and in the hearts of believers. These beliefs are adhered to by all mainstream Protestant, Catholic, and Eastern Orthodox churches. However, this creates problems for the sect in claiming to be an expression of Judaism because Judaism denies all of these beliefs. Furthermore, the entire religious paradigm of Judaism is different from that of Christianity. Judaism is not primarily concerned with salvation from sin, but in living according to the will of God as expressed through the Torah.

           First and foremost, the divide between Judaism and Christianity has to do with the role of Jesus, not simply if he was the messiah, but whether or not he was a god. Judaism explicitly rejects Jesus as the messiah because of his failure to fulfill the requirements of the role. Judaism also rejects the idea that a human being can be God and on principle will not worship other gods. The Christian deification of Jesus violates both the concept of monotheism and the rejection of a human incarnation of God. Both principles can be found in the Bible. Furthermore, the Torah explicitly warns against false prophets, which by any rational standard Jesus (and the apostles) would fall into, even if we accepted the idea that he (they) performed miracles.

           The Jewish commitment to monotheism can be found throughout the Bible. The first and second commandments state, “I the Lord am your God who brought you out of the land of Egypt, the house of bondage: You shall have no other gods besides Me. You shall not make for yourself a sculptured image […] You shall not bow down to them or serve them” (Exodus 20:2-5). The central statement of Jewish faith can be found in Deuteronomy 6:4-5, “Hear, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone. You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might.” And finally, God declares his utter singularity in Isaiah 45:5, “I am the Lord and there is none else; beside Me there is no god.” These verses reveal the absolute unity of God in Jewish theology. God identifies himself as the savior of the Jews from Egyptian slavery, and declares that the Jews will worship no other gods, in fact that there are no gods beside (with) him. Jewish interpretations of these verses have led them to completely reject the Christian doctrine of the Trinity as having no basis in the Bible. Moses Maimonides, one the greatest and most authoritative Jewish legal scholars in history, included in his 13 principles of faith belief in the absolute unity of God. Divisions like those of the Trinity are rejected.

           Maimonides also included a rejection of divine incarnation as one of his principles of Jewish faith, which he grounded in the Bible. The Jewish faith rejects the idea that God would have a physical body. The prophet Hosea quotes God as saying, “I am God and not a man” (Hosea 11:9). In the Torah, the idea that God could be a human being is explicitly rejected, “God is not a man to be capricious, or mortal to change his mind. Would he speak and not act, promise and not fulfill?” (Numbers 23:19). Moving away from the Bible there is also the logical inconsistency of the idea of an infinite, eternal God truly becoming a finite, contingent human being. The concept of God is inherently mutually exclusive from that of humanity. One cannot truly become the other without totally leaving behind the nature of the former being. I.e. if God were to truly become a human being, he would cease to be God. The Incarnation not only violates the fundamental teaching of Jewish theology, but also flies in the face of logic.

           Moving away from these irreconcilable theological differences between Judaism and Christianity, there is the issue of the messiah. Christians, including Messianic Jews, believe that Jesus was the messiah, while Jews, in keeping with the teachings of halakha and the Bible, reject this claim. The reason for the rejection of the claim that Jesus was the messiah has to do with the standards which Jews have for the messiah. Primarily, the messiah will reestablish the Davidic line of kings, gather the Jewish exiles to Israel, and establish a world rule marked by world peace and mass recognition of the Jewish understanding of God as the correct one (Daniel 7:13-14; Isaiah 2:2-4; Micah 4:1-4; Ezekiel 39:9; Ezekiel 36:24; Isaiah 11:9; Jeremiah 31:31-34; Zechariah 8:23, 14:9,16). There are other, less dramatic requirements which I will not list here. None of these things have happened. Furthermore, Jesus failed to be properly descended from King David. The gospels state that Jesus was born of a virgin and did not have a human father. This in itself bars him from being the messiah if it is true because royal succession is passed through the father, not the mother. Assuming the validity of Jesus genealogy in the gospels, we must also take into account that he was not descended through the proper royal line. Luke shows Jesus as descended from Nathan, not Solomon, but the messiah must be descended from David through Solomon (Luke 3:31; II Samuel 7:12-17; I Chronicles 22:9-10). Because Jesus failed to have the proper pedigree and failed to fulfill the role of the messiah, Jews reject his claim to be the messiah.

           There is one other problem with the Christian understanding of the messiah, i.e. that the messiah must suffer and die for the sins of humanity. This idea is completely foreign to Judaism which explicitly rejects human sacrifice. It is, however, completely at home in pagan understandings of a dying and rising savior god, like Osiris, Horus, or Mithra. The Bible repeatedly and consistently states that human sacrifice is abhorrent to God (Deuteronomy 12:30-31; Jeremiah 19:4-6; Psalm 106:37-38; Ezekiel 16:20). Nor does Judaism, or the Bible, teach that a blood sacrifice must be made for the forgiveness of sin (Leviticus 5:11-13; Jonah 3:10; Jeremiah 7:22-23; 2 Chronicles 7:14; Psalm 51:16-17; etc. etc.). Judaism is consistent in teaching that repentance is what God looks for to forgive sins, not sacrifice. Furthermore, Judaism does not teach that someone can atone for the sins of another, each person must atone for their own sins (Deuteronomy 24:16; Ezekiel 18:1-4, 20-24, 26-27; Jeremiah 31:29-30). For all these reasons the death of Jesus, a human sacrifice, has no place in Jewish theology, nor would the God of Judaism accept such a sacrifice.

           And finally, there is the issue of false prophets. Deuteronomy 13:2-6 states in part, “If there appears a prophet or dream diviner and he gives you a sign or portent, saying, ‘let us follow and worship another god’ […] even if the sign […] comes true, do not heed the words of that prophet […] the Lord is testing you.” Jesus claimed to be the son of God (perhaps even God himself) in John 8, and Paul taught throughout the epistles that “Jesus is Lord.” Considering the Jewish adherence to strict monotheism, these proclamations amount to Jesus, Paul, and any other Jewish Christian falling under the label of a false prophet, someone claiming to speak for God while violating the Torah, specifically the commands to worship God alone and obey his commandments. When a Jewish Christian proselytizes another Jew and exhorts him or her to worship Jesus, they are explicitly violating the dictates of the Torah as laid out above, not “fulfilling” or “completing” their Jewish faith.

           The Torah teaches that the Torah is binding on all Jews for all time (Deuteronomy 29:9-14). There is no escape clause in the Torah. Judaism also views the Torah as a blessing, not a curse. It is through observing the teachings of the Torah that Jews are able to obey and draw close to God and live a good life (Deuteronomy 30:11-20). Therefore, the Messianic/Christian claim that the Torah leads to sin and death and has been discarded or superseded by the “new covenant” established by a false messiah is fundamentally incompatible with Judaism. If the Messianic movement accepts the teachings of the Christian New Testament, then they are fundamentally opposed to the essential teachings of Judaism, and therefore, the religion that they practice is not Judaism at all. It is Christianity deceitfully calling itself Judaism and appropriated Jewish rituals for the sake of converting Jews to Christianity. Christianity and Judaism are not compatible religions to be syncretized. Each has its own internal rationale and belief system. While there may be Jewish Christians (people born Jewish who converted to Christianity), there is no such thing as Christian Judaism. It is a contradiction of terms.

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Saying Jews Are White
  1. You are not about to say all Jews are white, are you? They are not. Historically Jewish groups such as the Sephardim and Mizrahim are not white. According to all movements of Judaism every person a Jew gives birth to is 100% Jewish, regardless of the race of either parent.

  2. You are not about to suggest that Jews outside the United States are white, are you? Using only terms like “white” and “of color” to define racial boundaries is a US-specific phenomenon rooted in the unique way slavery manifested itself in the country. In Europe it was a white supremacist ideology that motivated the genocide of Jews.

  3. You are not about to refer to European Jews as “white Jews”, are you? “White Jews” is a term that European antisemites applied to gentiles who were sympathetic to Jews during the Holocaust. When people apply it to European Jews, they are racializing them and de-Judaizing them. (Note: If you doubt the points made after Question 2 above, ask yourself how anyone would have thought to refer to gentiles as white Jews if they considered Jews white.)

  4. You are not about to suggest that Ashkenazi Jews originated in Europe, are you? To do so would be to regurgitate a pseudo-scientific claim that some have used to deny Jews their heritage while appropriating it for themselves.

  5. You are not about to imply that US-based hate groups such as the Ku Klux Klan think of Jews as white, are you? They definitely do not.

  6. You are not about to deny the history of forced assimilation that has brought about the situation in which many Jews have light skin, are you?

  7. You are not about to try to make a distinction between people who are “religiously” Jewish and people who are “ethnically” Jewish, are you? Such a distinction has no basis in history, in anthropology, or in Jewish law.

  8. You are not about to suggest that to be Jewish is to have an invisible oppression, are you? Because many Jews share genes or share a culture, many Jews have characteristics that can be used to identify them as Jews.

  9. You are not about to minimize the oppression of Jews to make a point about a different oppression, are you? All oppression, including horizontal oppression, is deplorable. The only way to win the Oppression Olympics is not to play.

anonymous asked:

Stan Lee and Jack Kirby are both of Jewish decent.

They’re Jews. What’s with this “Jewish descent” wikipedia crap? They’re both Jews, admitted and acknowledged as such. 

The term “Jewish descent” only really applies when someone with partial Jewish ancestry who has not self-identified as Jewish is talking about their ancestry. This is not the case for either Lee or Kirby. And yet this “Jewish descent” garbage proliferates all over the place online. As if someone being just straight up Jewish is undesirable and they need to be distanced from it. 

Jack Kirby made custom Hannukah cards for crying out loud.


And Stan Lee said the following: "To me you can wrap all of Judaism up in one sentence, and that is, ‘Do not do unto others…’ All I tried to do in my stories was show that there’s some innate goodness in the human condition. And there’s always going to be evil; we should always be fighting evil.“

Yes, they de-Judaized their names because of the prejudice they faced in the eras when they began their important work in the comic industry. That doesn’t make them not Jews or lesser Jews for it. 

anonymous asked:

Why are atheistic Jews never called "deceptive" and their jewishness never questioned? Messianic Jew's are persecuted despite believing in hashem and being pro Israel -despite following the mitzvot and being as Jewish as can they are persecuted by their own people. I'm not a Messianic Jew I'm a Christian. I'm unequivocallly pro Jewish and support and love Israel and Netenyahu but this is one thing I can't stand about Jews. The way the Messianics are treated is un-Jewish.

I don’t know how to begin to unravel the bullshit that is this ask.

1. Atheistic Jews don’t try to convince theistic Jews to practice Christianity while calling it a form of Judaism.

2. Messianic Jews do not practice Judaism. They practice a heavily judaized version of Christianity while claiming that it is NOT incompatible with Judaism, except for the fact that it is most definitely incompatible.

3. Being pro-Israel and pro-Netanyahu is not a required part of Judaism.

4. Admitted goyim really shouldn’t be the ones evaluating what is and isn’t “un-Jewish.”

5. The “persecution” faced by Messianic Jews is a load of hogwash. It’s Messianic Judaism’s existence that persecutes Jews along with the Jews for Jesus and other Christian Missionary sects that target Jews through deceit.

You have no right to the moral high ground here. Good day.

Paul saw very clearly that the difference between the Judaizers and himself was the difference between two entirely distinct types of religion; it was the difference between a religion of merit and a religion of grace. If Christ provides only a part of our salvation, leaving us to provide the rest, then we are still hopeless under the load of sin. For no matter how small the gap which must be bridged before salvation can be attained, the awakened conscience sees clearly that our wretched attempt at goodness is insufficient even to bridge that gap. The guilty soul enters again into the hopeless reckoning with God, to determine whether we have really done our part. And thus we groan again under the old bondage of the law. Such an attempt to piece out the work of Christ by our own merit, Paul saw clearly, is the very essence of unbelief; Christ will do everything or nothing, and the only hope is to throw ourselves unreservedly on His mercy and trust Him for all.
— 

J. G. Machen

This quote is long, but damn is it spot on.

My Jerusalem
Jerusalem looks more and more as if it is under the ownership of the Israelis and the internationals, either living in it or talking about it from the outside. What does it represent for me as a Palestinian Jerusalemite? Why I am excluded not only when it comes to my rights to the city, and my rights in the city, but also excluded from my right of representing it?
Like many Palestinian Jerusalemites, I have a demolition order for my house since 2002. And as with many others, a new road that links between two settlements in East Jerusalem started to be created passing exactly at the entrance of my house in Shuafat.
This is just a minor example of the deprivation of the Palestinian Jerusalemites’ rights in the city. But I also have no right to the city, I am not allowed to make a political claim that East Jerusalem is mine, something that the international community organizations in the city is adapting to, by avoiding to take actions that make Israel angry with them in the city.
Thirdly I have no right to represent myself politically. At the legal level I am obliged to be defined as" A Jordanian Citizen residing Permanently in Israel", as the Israeli authorities define my status, then I am an alien in my city, cannot claim it, and as a “Jordanian” living in Israel as the say, I have to respect the generosity of the Israel of allowing me to live in an “Israeli ” territory that was annexed to Israel in 1967.
Therefore I also have no right to represent myself administratively, also at the community level. In this level my Arab Municipality was dissolved by the Israeli Authorities in 1967, and then I was obliged to deal with an Israeli municipality that does not represent me. Such a municipality imposed on me its community centers that it established inside my communities, and made it the address for providing services to me.
Facing several complex challenges in Jerusalem
These are just examples, and there are many others, while my presence in my city faces several complex challenges, that are: First: Judaization of the land, the place, the space, and the landscape. Second: Israelization of the institutions by obliging me to deal only with Israeli organizations for the services, while closing the Palestinian organizations and delegitimizing any link between those existing and the Palestinian Authority. Third: Ethnic cleansing by using different methods of evacuating me out of my city. Fourth: Isolation of those who will stay in the city after all of this by disconnecting the Palestinian neighborhoods in the city from each other, therefore I will need to pass through a Jewish “neighborhood”, when I need to move from one Palestinian neighborhood to another. In addition to that is the isolation of houses in each Palestinian neighborhood by creating Jewish enclaves inside these neighborhoods such as in the Old City and Silwan. Fifth and last: The closure started in 1993 by checkpoints and permits system, and ended with the creation of a Separation Wall, aiming to disconnect between the Palestinian Jerusalemites
—  By Walid Salem